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Forum topic by Jack Lewis posted 07-10-2018 04:13 PM 761 views 0 times favorited 5 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Jack Lewis

529 posts in 1640 days


07-10-2018 04:13 PM

I am attempting to glue up three identical (as much as possible) segmented rings, split them on bandsaw into two halves each and layer a third ring between each pair. Problem is the drift and inaccuracies are too random to rely on. My question is- Is it a false ecomomy to consider splitting the rings or should I plane the stock closer to planned thickness before making the rings. I am hoping to save glue up time by splitting rings but if I have to make additional ones because of mentioned error I will lose more than what I save. I have taken 13/32” rings, split them in to vaneer thickness okay but there is more tolerance with the thinner results. Any experiences? How did you do it?

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"


5 replies so far

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splintergroup

3064 posts in 1784 days


#1 posted 07-10-2018 05:38 PM

I’m not 100% sure on what you are doing?

I make round frames with segmented sections (usually 8 segments for rings of 10” I.D.). Typically I’ll use maybe 1” thick segments, resaw into thirds on the bandsaw, then flatten them all on the drum sander before gluing them all back together (with a half-segment rotation on each layer for strength).

I’ll then take the assembly to the router table and turn them into true rings.

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TheDane

5708 posts in 4225 days


#2 posted 07-10-2018 07:18 PM

I have never had much luck splitting them on the bandsaw, and I don’t see myself investing in an accu-slice system anytime soon.

I split rings on the lathe.

Let’s say I need two 1/4” rings with a feature ring sandwiched in between them. I build a ring 3/4” thick, flatten both sides on the drum sander, glue it to the stack on the lathe, and let it dry for an hour or so. I part it in the middle, turn to final thickness and flatten with a sanding board. I glue in and flatten the feature ring (or whatever goes in between the two halves of the split ring), then glue in the half I parted off. Since one side is already flat, I just let if dry for a while, then turn it to final thickness and flatten with a sanding board.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Jack Lewis

529 posts in 1640 days


#3 posted 07-11-2018 01:09 PM



I have never had much luck splitting them on the bandsaw, and I don t see myself investing in an accu-slice system anytime soon.

I split rings on the lathe.

Let s say I need two 1/4” rings with a feature ring sandwiched in between them. I build a ring 3/4” thick, flatten both sides on the drum sander, glue it to the stack on the lathe, and let it dry for an hour or so. I part it in the middle, turn to final thickness and flatten with a sanding board. I glue in and flatten the feature ring (or whatever goes in between the two halves of the split ring), then glue in the half I parted off. Since one side is already flat, I just let if dry for a while, then turn it to final thickness and flatten with a sanding board.

- TheDane

Exactly the answer I was expecting and the way I will go. Thanks

-- "PLUMBER'S BUTT! Get over it, everybody has one"

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doubleG469

857 posts in 1006 days


#4 posted 07-12-2018 03:24 PM

split them on the lathe with a parting tool. I’ve seen it done on video and it worked well.

-- I refuse to edit the photo orientation for this website any longer. It’s an issue they should address and correct. Gary, Texas

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Ron Ford

216 posts in 2294 days


#5 posted 07-14-2018 03:50 PM

The Accu-Slice is far from cheap, but it does exactly what you want to do with no blade drift. If you are a segmenter, the added Accu-Wedge accessory is amazing. Like I said, not cheap, but in this case you actually do get what you pay for. Hope this helps.

-- Once in awhile I make something really great. Most days I just make sawdust.

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