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Table saw stand with casters?

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Forum topic by VintageFlatulence posted 07-09-2018 10:20 PM 2942 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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VintageFlatulence

12 posts in 1118 days


07-09-2018 10:20 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question

I guess this is a safety issue so I’ll start here.

I have a Craftsman 113 table saw on the metal stand. I have been wanting to make a new stand with casters, but as I research I see that a number of folks prefer wheels that raise and lower the saw so that it sits directly on the floor while in use. But I also see a lot of attractive designs of bases with casters under them.

So I guess this question is posed to those who use casters on custom built bases.

Do you notice any shifting of the saw when using it? Is it enough to cause concern for safety and/or accuracy of the cut?

I’d certainly appreciate your input.


20 replies so far

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BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2567 days


#1 posted 07-09-2018 10:30 PM

Definitely would not use casters. They always move, even the best locking casters.

I only have a router table with casters (bench dog locking wheels) and it works ok because it is light and the workflow is very different. I would not attempt that with my table saw.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

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HokieKen

12008 posts in 1747 days


#2 posted 07-10-2018 12:41 PM

I have my tablesaw on a stand I built and it has 3” double-locking casters. Been using it for 2+ years and never had any issue. These are the casters I used.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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Planeman40

1473 posts in 3369 days


#3 posted 07-10-2018 01:08 PM

I put my 800 pound Hammer K3 sliding table saw on non-locking casters and it stays put while using. In fact, it takes some real shoving to make it move. I did this to make this big saw repositionable in my relatively small shop to allow for long boards which in my basement shop are rare. In fact, most of my machines are on non-locking casters and don’t move when using. My theory if if you are moving one of these machines with pressure, you are doing something very wrong. However, I generally only make smaller things, not big cabinets or very large projects.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

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bondogaposis

5605 posts in 2959 days


#4 posted 07-10-2018 01:15 PM

I had a 113 on casters for 30 year and almost never locked the casters, it made it easy to shove out of the way when I needed to in my tight shop. I never had any trouble feeding lumber through the blade and having the saw move. It was one of those things I worried about when building the stand that turned out to be a non-issue.

-- Bondo Gaposis

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Ripper70

1371 posts in 1517 days


#5 posted 07-10-2018 01:22 PM

I have my Delta TS on locking casters and have not ever had a problem with the unit shifting. The saw has cast iron wings and a 60” extension and the station I built has plenty of weight. The whole unit sits on a torsion box and having the added mass helps keep the whole thing from moving when the wheels are locked down.

If you’re considering a simple mobile base or just adding caters to the metal stand, that might not be very stable. If you can, consider something like this:

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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Steve

1702 posts in 1191 days


#6 posted 07-10-2018 01:50 PM

I have my Craftsman 113 on casters and it won’t move when cutting wood. In fact, it can be frustrating when you forget to unlock one wheel and you wonder why the cart won’t move when trying to put it back in place.

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clin

1076 posts in 1604 days


#7 posted 07-10-2018 04:13 PM



I have my tablesaw on a stand I built and it has 3” double-locking casters. Been using it for 2+ years and never had any issue. These are the casters I used.

- HokieKen

+1

Double locking is the key, wheels don’t rotate OR swivel. Used on my planer stand and I think would be secure enough for a table saw. Also, using casters is so easy, you might as well try it.

I’ll admit I use a stand on my TS that raises and lowers the whole saw with a foot pump. And I’d do that again because by lifting the whole saw it lifts the extension table attached to the side. FYI, it’s the SawStop ICS mobile base at ~$300+. So not cheap. Worth it to me, but I still think casters can get the job done, if a bit less convenient to use.

-- Clin

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Megalos

2 posts in 606 days


#8 posted 07-10-2018 05:56 PM

Could you just whip up some kind of wheel chocks for the casters?

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MrRon

5812 posts in 3852 days


#9 posted 07-10-2018 07:05 PM

Some casters move easily and others don’t move that easily. Usually small dia wheel casters on a swivel don’t move that easily, especially when the machine is heavy. Large dia casters similar to shopping cart casters move too easily for a saw. Ideally, the saw should be firmly positioned so it can’t move no way. Depending on the type of caster wheel material used it may move easily or not. Whatever caster you use, I would make sure it has both wheel and swivel brakes and they only are needed on 2 of the wheels. Brakes are difficult to apply on 4 casters, as the brake usually swivels under the base and become inaccessible to your foot. I would put 2 swivel or non-swivel casters at the rear of the saw base and 2 swivel casters with dual brakes on the front

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2567 days


#10 posted 07-10-2018 08:34 PM

Ignore me and use casters! LOL.

I am surprised there are so many using them. I know locking casters are much better now, but I don’t like the swivel when you move the tool even when locked. I like the bases with two wheels and two adjustable feet. Better for leveling on uneven floors.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View clin's profile

clin

1076 posts in 1604 days


#11 posted 07-10-2018 09:50 PM



Ignore me and use casters! LOL.

I am surprised there are so many using them. I know locking casters are much better now, but I don t like the swivel when you move the tool even when locked. I like the bases with two wheels and two adjustable feet. Better for leveling on uneven floors.

- BroncoBrian

Double locking casters also lock the swivel. But I agree, if the wheel locks, but still swivel, then things can still move around a bit.

-- Clin

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HackFabrication

159 posts in 320 days


#12 posted 08-08-2019 12:22 PM

I’ve got a Shop Fox mobile base under my C’man TS:

It’s been ‘modified’ (using another Shop Fox base), to six swivel casters with the lockdown feet. That and/or with the outfeed table extended: It doesn’t move. But raising the lockdowns (and dropping the outfeed table) it will move freely out of the way.

-- "In the end, it's all Hack..."

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Robert

3602 posts in 2089 days


#13 posted 08-08-2019 01:42 PM

Good quality casters will not move when locked. Don’t use the once with the swivel arm. I would get the step on/step off type where the wheel and the swivel both lock.

I’ve used the locking swivel casters HD carries on assembly tables and they are excellent.

Here's a link.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

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pottz

7702 posts in 1592 days


#14 posted 08-08-2019 02:33 PM

every tool and bench in my shop is on casters,most of the time i dont even lock them and have not had an issue in the last 25 years,i wouldn’t worry about it.i highly recommend polyurethane casters,ive tried em all and their the best.

-- sawdust the bigger the pile the bigger my smile-larry,so cal.

View controlfreak's profile

controlfreak

411 posts in 209 days


#15 posted 08-08-2019 02:35 PM

I just bought 5” locking casters to use on a Craftsman TS base that I found on the side of the road. I plan on attaching plywood to the bottom and top of the base. The bottom will act as a storage shelf and the bolt on vs threaded casters are cheaper. On the top I will attach my new DW735. I got the large 5” so I can roll it down my small shop ramp for long boards or just to free up floor space. My jointer has four locking casters however I only have needed to lock the two facing me to keep it stationary. Even if I had a larger shop I would still prefer casters. It makes changing positions easy and cleanup a breeze. I like the lever lock better than the rocker style because it is easy to visually check the status.

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