LumberJocks

Help me to identity this 15" Planer.

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by Saaz posted 07-06-2018 02:17 PM 1768 views 0 times favorited 18 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Saaz's profile

Saaz

7 posts in 382 days


07-06-2018 02:17 PM

Topic tags/keywords: planer

I purchased this planer this afternoon and I’m wondering if someone can help me identity who made it. I believe it’s a DC-380 clone, but thats all I know about it. All the badging is missing and I cannot find a model number on it anywhere.


18 replies so far

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6231 posts in 1135 days


#1 posted 07-06-2018 03:43 PM

I am wondering if its HOT ….NO model nor serial number is very odd :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View PPK's profile

PPK

1441 posts in 1232 days


#2 posted 07-06-2018 04:06 PM

The color of it makes it look like an old General. Hmm. I’m thinking about it, there are a lot of planers that look like this. The grizzly is pretty similar. It may not be that old after all.

Looks like a nice planer though! If its not sloppy and it runs good, should be a good user!

-- Pete

View PPK's profile

PPK

1441 posts in 1232 days


#3 posted 07-06-2018 04:11 PM

I bet its a Grizzly. Grizzly 15” Planer Model G1051 See this posting. THere was just a sticker on the front, that probably came off long ago…

http://www.kandbauction.com/lot/81687-108688-9616/grizzly-15--planer-model-g1051---220-volt/

-- Pete

View BattleBorn's profile

BattleBorn

1 post in 382 days


#4 posted 07-06-2018 04:21 PM

It looks very similar to the Grizzly G1021

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7408 posts in 2621 days


#5 posted 07-06-2018 04:31 PM

Some kind of clone of the Delta 22-780/DC-380 and similar models… almost identical clones were made by Grizzly, Jet, General International, Woodtek, etc…

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

206 posts in 381 days


#6 posted 07-06-2018 09:04 PM

It’s a early grizzly G1021. They differ from the original Delta in that the bed, rather than the head moves

View Saaz's profile

Saaz

7 posts in 382 days


#7 posted 07-06-2018 09:16 PM

Thanks everyone. I appreciate your help to identify it. I don’t believe it has been used in a while is there anything that you would recommend that I should do to it before I start using it?

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7408 posts in 2621 days


#8 posted 07-06-2018 09:18 PM

It s a early grizzly G1021. They differ from the original Delta in that the bed, rather than the head moves
- Jared_S

Good catch – and that design is significantly better than the moving head design IMO.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Jared_S's profile

Jared_S

206 posts in 381 days


#9 posted 07-06-2018 09:45 PM



It s a early grizzly G1021. They differ from the original Delta in that the bed, rather than the head moves
- Jared_S

Good catch – and that design is significantly better than the moving head design IMO.

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Yeah, and it’s the same design currently in use on all the current 4 post planers from grizzly, jet, powermatic.. the one odd thing on the old 1021 (and other clones) is the single speed gearbox with selector lever. It’s the same internally as the 2 spd, but missing the extra two gears. Also contrary to grizzlys information the early (1983 in this case) 1021 can be retrofit with a helical head with the swaping of two additional gears.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1507 posts in 1916 days


#10 posted 07-08-2018 01:46 PM


I don t believe it has been used in a while is there anything that you would recommend that I should do to it before I start using it?
- Saaz

Commercial used planers get put into storage when they are not working right.
Suggest you check it over thoroughly to avoid damage if something is not working:

1) Change the gear box oil. If you find metal fragments, might need to tear down gear box and inspect.

2) Check belt condition and tension. Belts are cheap and if not used for years, cheap insurance to avoid major issues if they shred/slip and fail.

3) Add oil to in-feed & out-feed brass bearing blocks thru the adjustment screw holes.

4) Remove the cover over the feed roller chains, clean and oil the chains. Inspect for any broken teeth.

5) Check surface condition of the in-feed and out feed rollers. If rusty, wire brush them clean or rust will deposit on wood and can nick blades. Additionally some of 15” Grizzly planers use serrated steel out-feed rollers; which can leave marks on wood. Grizzly sells a rubber out feed roller to fix complaints of steel roller marking wood on light cuts. Rubber rollers also degrade over time, replace them if chunks are missing or debris is embedded in rollers.

6) Check all key height settings: Blade to bed parallelism, entrance/exit roller height difference, in-bed roller height, chip breaker height.
There are various small screws (many with lock nuts) used in those adjustments and they are 1st to loosen up under vibration or heavy use. These height settings can also be changed from default easily, and some folks change them to optimize for cutting only soft wood, or only dense exotic woods.

Instructions for all of these routine maintenance items is located in the Grizzly planer manuals.

————————————————————
Not trying to confuse this identification, but
Was investigating Grizzly 1021 15” planer model after seeing posts in this thread and noticed that Grizzly site is resurrecting the old G1021 as new G1021Z available in October.

It has a price $20 more than current G0454 BEFORE new China excise tax. There is no mention of new excise tax on G1021Z, which hopefully means it may be coming from Taiwan as a way to help keep prices lower and avoid new tax. Getting parts for new/old 1021 models may get more confusing….

Best luck with new tool.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View Saaz's profile

Saaz

7 posts in 382 days


#11 posted 07-10-2018 02:13 AM

Ok, Thanks CaptainKlutz. The information you provide was exactly what I was looking for. I do appreciate it.

View Saaz's profile

Saaz

7 posts in 382 days


#12 posted 12-30-2018 03:53 PM

The original knifes that came with this planer were damaged so, I replaced them with a new set the guy gave me when i purchased it, but I’m having trouble getting them in alignment with each other. One of the knifes sets up higher than the other two. I assumed the springs were worn out so, I ordered some replacement springs for it, but they are too big and will not slide in the holes in the cutter head. Grizzly sent me some replacement springs that were smaller than the first set I purchased, but still will not work. Does anyone have any suggestions on how I can fix this issue? I bought a pack of springs from Home Depot, but none of them worked. I also try a spring out of a Bic lighter as some suggested in a post on the internet, but that didn’t work either.
It may be something I’m doing wrong, but I have tried settings them multiple times and I get the same resolves. I’m also using a knife setting jig I purchased from Grizzly that’s for g1021.

View therealSteveN's profile

therealSteveN

3116 posts in 996 days


#13 posted 12-30-2018 09:18 PM

$$$$$$$ is always the answer, but I would look into the post made by Jared_S above. A Helical head will cost a few bux, but once in, you’ll be forever glad you did it.

These 4 post planers are hard to wreck, If the motor is good, you’ll have a 20 year machine minimum, likely much longer than that with some routine maintenance. Gear Oil is a BIGGIE here, change it, and do same every year or 2 depending on use. A happy gearbox is the secret to these things having a long life.

-- Think safe, be safe

View Saaz's profile

Saaz

7 posts in 382 days


#14 posted 12-30-2018 10:12 PM

I hear you and I’m about ready to swap out the cutter head. I followed CaptainKlutz advise and changed the gear oil first. Perhaps Jared_S would be kind and provide me the part numbers he used in his conversion. I’m unsure about the additional gearing parts that are required for this. I going to do some research on my own to see if I can determine which parts I need for this, but any information he could provide would be appreciated. One thing I didn’t think of was there could be issues with what I thought was a new set of knifes. I when back and starting putting some of the old the knifes back in the machine this afternoon and I was it get them pretty close to one another, but still not perfect. The one knife from the new set that was sticking up higher than the other seems to be smaller on one end. I am wondering if the set was not new after all and has been milled or sharpened incorrectly. I was hoping to get it up and running without spending any more money on it and I just bought a jointer. I’m not sure I can get this purchase past the wife. :)

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1507 posts in 1916 days


#15 posted 12-30-2018 11:07 PM

Setting knives takes some finesse, and can be tough if things are moving and you don’t see it. The PROCESS for doing it is just as important as having a knife setting jig.

One common issue is knife movement as you tighten the gib screws. Make sure the head where gib screws are located is clean, and oiled to reduce friction as you tighten them. Also clean any junk or rust from screws. Be careful about amount and weight of any oil used on blade/head. Heavy oil will create extra stiction between flat surfaces and prevent easy movement.

It seems to work best if the gib screws are snug, but still loose enough to allow slight blade movements. I usually tighten the outer 2 screws until the blade movement is ‘stiff’, with blade just above intended position. Then gently push down on jig and tighten one screw. Do same for other end. Even with springs under blade, if screw is too loose, you can push blade too low while pushing down on jig. Next tighten center gib to lock position before tightening the rest. If you use Rotocator (DIY is cheaper – 123 block, HF dial indicator, and long bolt), you can rotate planer head and check blade to table height after tightening only end screws to see if things are parallel. Once ends are locked down, the rest is sort of easy. Although you can push down center too hard with jig and create a couple of thousandths dip in middle of blade, so be gentle.

One solution to help with setting knives is to use planer pal. They use magnets to help hold blades in place. The magnets do not make them infallible, and also require some patience and practice to use successfully. Friend owns a set and they do help setting blade height when you have jack screws under the blades. But with spring only, IMHO not worth spending extra $100 for this set up jig.

Another setting jig that some folks like is a universal magnetic planer/jointer jig. Amazon and Fleabay have many for sale. Challenge with these jigs is you need to know how far the blade is supposed to extend from head. It is easy if you use the tool to measure before removal. But fail to measure before removing existing blades and you spend extra time worrying about proper and best blade height. :( I had a set about 20 years ago in on old shop, and then sold everything. When I acquired another used 15” planer, decided I could make the standard jig work.

One last tip about setting blades: You are working wood that moves a lot based on humidity and temperature, not setting up a precision milling machine. Having a couple thousandths difference between one end of blade and another is no big deal. Relatively speaking, a sheet of 20lb printer paper is ~0.002 inches thick. IME – until the end to end height difference exceeds ~0.005-0.007 inches (2-3 sheets of paper), you won’t even notice that planed wood surface is not perfectly parallel. Even then the subtle error will only be seen when edge gluing panels, or cutting precision dove tail joints in thin panels.

PS – Latest post comments on blade variation makes me worry. Suggest you go and buy a new set of blades. Have had best blade life from the inexpensive T1-HSS grades .vs cheaper D2/M2 grades. Seems they are being replaced by V2 at most suppliers. Try Oella Saw and Tool or Holbren for quality knives at fair price. (Holbren needs discount codes to get best price)

Best Luck.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

showing 1 through 15 of 18 replies

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com