LumberJocks

New to me bandsaw

  • Advertise with us

« back to Power Tools, Hardware and Accessories forum

Forum topic by mIps posted 07-05-2018 02:14 AM 647 views 0 times favorited 12 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View mIps's profile

mIps

200 posts in 2473 days


07-05-2018 02:14 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question bandsaw

Just got my first bandsaw. it’s a little older (1993) and needs some TLC. the problem is, I’ve seen so much on setting up/ tuning up that I’m not really sure where to start other than general cleaning.
As far as I can tell, the rubber (or whatever) tires around the wheels seems to be okay, the belt seems to be in decent condition, the table seems to be flat (needs a new insert). In short, generally it seems to be in good condition.
What can I do that I haven’t done to give this thing the best chance to do a decent job?
What is “proper tension”?
it has at least 3 pulleys on the motor, (small, med, large) which one should I Use?
Any other info is appreciated!

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.


12 replies so far

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

874 posts in 3740 days


#1 posted 07-05-2018 02:45 AM

It would help to know the exact saw.

For wood cutting you want the fastest speed to largest motor pulley to smallest wheel pulley. That is assuming the wheel still has its triple pulley on it…

Hopefully, it is not a metal only saw with very slow speeds.

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2828 days


#2 posted 07-05-2018 02:49 AM

Get a good blade for it.

What make and model is it? = will be helpful in giving more advice. :)

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View mIps's profile

mIps

200 posts in 2473 days


#3 posted 07-06-2018 04:00 AM

It is Foremost Machinery model BAWB001A, dated 1993. It has a 4 pulley assembly on the motor and a second one near the bottom wheel. Bottom and top pulleys are attached by a belt. the top pulley then goes to the pulley that is attached to the wheel itself with a second, smaller belt. Top guides have blocks on the sides and a bearing on the back. (thrust bearing) I know they need adjusting. Bottom is the same and likely needs adjusted as well. The blade seems like it is in decent shape but I have not tried to cut anything yet.

this one is very similar to what I have:
https://uedata.amazon.com/FM-Quality-Foremost-Tools-14-Inch/dp/B016AXENZS

the main difference is mine has the motor down inside the stand rather than on the top of the stand as shown.

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#4 posted 07-06-2018 04:14 AM

Obligatory band saw tune up video:

Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass

Watch it, do it, start making sawdust.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: A 1993 model is practically new :)

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

874 posts in 3740 days


#5 posted 07-06-2018 04:26 AM

That’s a pretty typical “no-name” Chiwanese (most likely Taiwan in that era) copy of a Delta 14” cast saw. Most were roughly Harbor Freight (Central Machinery) quality.

My concern with the double reduction gearing is that it is a metal only saw without a high enough speed for useful wood cutting, most of the inexpensive 14” metal/wood saws only have a single reduction pulley setup and don’t really go slow enough for harder ferrous metals. Before spending time and money on the saw I would try to track down the specs to see what the fastest blade speed is OR do the calculations on the lowest reduction pulley arrangement to determine the fastest blade speed in FPM.

Most of those saws have the typical 1/2” x 1/2” square guide blocks and a typical “skateboard” thrust bearing. The blocks are available from Grizzly/Jet et al that had or have saws that used block guides and from multiple third parties in various materials plus you can make them from hard oily wood or oil soaked hardwood like maple. The bearings are dirt cheap from tons of sources including eBay. Most every part is available and the most likely to bend/crack/break is the upper wheel hinge, caused by overzealous tensioning. Note this part nor the guide blocks are interchangeable with a Delta but are with almost all the imports.

View bigJohninvegas's profile

bigJohninvegas

632 posts in 1881 days


#6 posted 07-06-2018 06:17 AM



Obligatory band saw tune up video:

Band Saw Clinic with Alex Snodgrass

Watch it, do it, start making sawdust.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: A 1993 model is practically new :)

- MrUnix

+1 For Brads advise. I tuned up my 17” Grizzly after watching this video.
Your saw looks just like the Harbor Freight woodworking saw that I started with.
Kinda wish I had kept it around.
Tune it up, and go for it.

-- John

View ohtimberwolf's profile

ohtimberwolf

933 posts in 2771 days


#7 posted 07-06-2018 12:26 PM

mIps: Be sure to at least watch this video. It will amaze you. larry

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4k-r5utmU2Q

-- Just a barn cat, now gone to cat heaven.

View mIps's profile

mIps

200 posts in 2473 days


#8 posted 07-06-2018 01:23 PM



My concern with the double reduction gearing is that it is a metal only saw without a high enough speed for useful wood cutting, most of the inexpensive 14” metal/wood saws only have a single reduction pulley setup and don t really go slow enough for harder ferrous metals. Before spending time and money on the saw I would try to track down the specs to see what the fastest blade speed is OR do the calculations on the lowest reduction pulley arrangement to determine the fastest blade speed in FPM.

I understand the concern. all i’ve been able to find so far is the info I gave. I know that the person I got it from was using it for woodworking and I know that does not mean a lot. Oon the motor, the largest pulley is roughly 4 1/2” and the smallest is roughly 3” ant he belt is on the small. On the upper, the pulleys are about the same size (its tough to get a measuring tool in there) and the belt in on the largest. For the secondary, the belt is from the small to a roughly 6” on the wheel. Motor looks like 1720 rpm, 3/4 HP so, if calc is right, top pulley would be around 1150 rpm and wheel pulley would be about 530 RPM. The pulleys may be reversible, I haven’t tried yet.

-- Be honest, honorable, kind, work hard, and generally be awesome.

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

220 posts in 416 days


#9 posted 07-06-2018 02:55 PM

+2 for the bandsaw video Brad suggested. I watched it and improved my saw’s performance exponentially. The most important take away from the video is to center the blade’s gullet on the top tire for straighter tracking. Also, go onto Carter’s web site and get new guide rollers. Way better than Cool Blocks.
Enjoy the new saw.
Best,
Tim

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

874 posts in 3740 days


#10 posted 07-06-2018 08:15 PM


My concern with the double reduction gearing is that it is a metal only saw without a high enough speed for useful wood cutting, most of the inexpensive 14” metal/wood saws only have a single reduction pulley setup and don t really go slow enough for harder ferrous metals. Before spending time and money on the saw I would try to track down the specs to see what the fastest blade speed is OR do the calculations on the lowest reduction pulley arrangement to determine the fastest blade speed in FPM.

I understand the concern. all i ve been able to find so far is the info I gave. I know that the person I got it from was using it for woodworking and I know that does not mean a lot.
Oon the motor, the largest pulley is roughly 4 1/2” and the smallest is roughly 3” ant he belt is on the small. On the upper, the pulleys are about the same size (its tough to get a measuring tool in there) and the belt in on the largest. For the secondary, the belt is from the small to a roughly 6” on the wheel.
Motor looks like 1720 rpm, 3/4 HP so, if calc is right, top pulley would be around 1150 rpm and wheel pulley would be about 530 RPM. The pulleys may be reversible, I haven t tried yet.

- mIps

It appears you have about 2000 fpm band speed which is about right for a 14” wood saw.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#11 posted 07-06-2018 08:22 PM

Sounds like it’s the same as the HF 4-speed bandsaw… claimed speeds are 568, 1080, 1582, 2529 FPM

Fastest is suitable for wood. Most people prefer to use the saw for one or the other (wood or metal) but not both. Metal chips and oil do not play well with sawdust and visa-versa, and trying to clean sufficiently between operations can be quite a chore.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View AHuxley's profile

AHuxley

874 posts in 3740 days


#12 posted 07-06-2018 08:26 PM


Also, go onto Carter s web site and get new guide rollers. Way better than Cool Blocks.

A common misconception (and it helps drive sales) but there is nothing a small bearing guide set like the Carter guides for 14” saws does that a properly dressed and setup solid block guide doesn’t do as well or better. Blocks will have a bigger surface contact area as well as having the guiding surface closer to the work. The amazing results heard from people who switch block to small bearing guides is a result of the combination of confirmation bias and the fact they just did a full tuneup and adjustment on the guides. Look at the best woodcutting bandsaws ever made and you will see solid block guides and large perpendicular thrust bearings with hardened edges.

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com