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Forum topic by mahdee posted 07-04-2018 07:36 PM 2573 views 0 times favorited 14 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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mahdee

4291 posts in 2186 days


07-04-2018 07:36 PM

Topic tags/keywords: tip question carving tool

Hi,
I am debating about buying this machine but really don’t know much about what it is capable off. Have send them a e-mail with a bunch of questions about the software, spindle, capacity and so on. They are offering a 17.76% off till midnight tonight. I want to 3-D carve signs, names, boxes. Maybe cut cutting board in shape of various states and countries, people’s name on things and so on. Give me some feedback please. Thank you in advance.

-- earthartandfoods.com


14 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1879 posts in 581 days


#1 posted 07-04-2018 07:42 PM

did you forget to mention what machine you are interested in ??
or ~ are you just asking about a CNC in general?

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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mahdee

4291 posts in 2186 days


#2 posted 07-04-2018 09:11 PM

Sorry about that John and thanks for pointing that out. here it is:

https://www.baileigh.com/desktop-cnc-router-table-dwr-2720

-- earthartandfoods.com

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1879 posts in 581 days


#3 posted 07-04-2018 09:23 PM

the Actual Working Area of 20” x 30” is a bit small.
something a trophy shop would use to engrave award plaques, etc.
BUT ~ don’t be fooled with the size. with experience, you could actually
build a carved sign that is 14 feet long and 6 feet tall with that machine !!!
for an entry level machine, doing the projects you mentioned, that size will be fine.
there are many used ones on the market where the owners gained their experience
and upgraded to larger table models. IMO, buying a used one that already has the
software, tools and cutting bits, would be the best avenue to pursue.
plus – maybe the seller would lend assistance when you need it if he is close by.
maybe the more experienced CNC owners can help with your decision making.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4291 posts in 2186 days


#4 posted 07-04-2018 11:04 PM

Thanks John for your input. I do live in a fairly remote area. I have about 4 neighbors and that encompass about a 5 miles radius. However, I do travel about 40,000.00 miles a year and can be flexible in my travels. Yes, it is a small area to work with but larger areas require larger room and larger projects and larger costs ($12000-$70.000.00) that I don’t want to invest in unless I live in one of those roach motel cities like San Francisco, NY, etc. Anyways, I am waiting to hears from the owners about some of the essential info that will determine whether the cost of this machine is worth considering. There is another company that my local laser guy has suggested from China that can get me a CNC machine that is twice as big and twice as cheap :). But I rather buy American and pay a little bit more at this time.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View JAAune's profile

JAAune

1864 posts in 2735 days


#5 posted 07-05-2018 01:57 AM

There’s not much info there and I’ve no idea what the proprietary software might be. If you don’t like the packaged software, can you buy different CAM software to run it? Also, 98ipm isn’t fast. It’ll take hours to do 3D carvings as large as the table size so that’s something to keep in mind.

It is much lower in price than the reputable Camaster SR-23 Stinger 1 so it’s not surprising that it would have less features.

A better option than a Chinese machine would be getting one made by Carl Bruce at Speedline CNC. You’d get an affordable machine built by a reputable one-man shop that has features normally found on commercial machines (encoders, ball screws, profile rails, etc). Downside is the long lead time since he can only build so many machines at a time. He’s currently building a highly customized machine for me. When I’ve got that setup and running, I’ll be selling a 4’x8’ CNC.

-- See my work at http://remmertstudios.com and http://altaredesign.com

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4291 posts in 2186 days


#6 posted 07-05-2018 02:18 AM

JAAune, Wow… Very interesting concepts. I’ve been reading, learning, thinking, etc…. for 3-5 years now. It has gotten to the point that the more I “know” the less confident I am in choosing the right machine. 4X8 one would be way too big for me but I would love to have one of those in my lower shop; just don’t know what to do with it.. I am certainly bigly open to have someone build me a machine that meets my need. I’ll certainly reach out to Carl Bruce if I can.. The waiting game for me with certain investments has exceeded 25-30 years… So, I can be patient.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View wuddoc's profile

wuddoc

349 posts in 4137 days


#7 posted 07-05-2018 02:39 AM

IWF Atlanta is coming in late August and most manufactures and distributors will have a booth there. You can ask questions not just of the manufacturers sales staff but the company technicians.

“IWF is the largest showcase of machinery, materials, supplies, and services in the Western Hemisphere for woodworking and related industries”.

There will be education sessions that may help you.

http://www.iwfatlanta.com/

-- Wuddoc

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1879 posts in 581 days


#8 posted 07-05-2018 01:23 PM

Wud – that is great info !!
I attended one in Orlando, FL several years ago and it is beyond words
to encourage woodworkers of any skill level or interest to attend if they possibly can.
even the weekend hobbyist can gain considerable knowledge in these venues.
[and you may even run across some of the TV woodworking show personalities].

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4291 posts in 2186 days


#9 posted 07-05-2018 02:05 PM

That place looks like a woodworker’s disneyland.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View SteveMI's profile

SteveMI

1137 posts in 3713 days


#10 posted 07-05-2018 02:28 PM


It is much lower in price than the reputable Camaster SR-23 Stinger 1 so it s not surprising that it would have less features. – JAAune

Camaster is a commercial use CNC company and highly regarded. It amazes me they make the SR-23 with the behemoth machines they make. My home shop has a 60 ipm CNC and I avoid 3D carving on it due to the time it takes. The Stinger cuts at 350+ ipm and rapid moves at 600+ ipm, this will make that type of work profitable.

Stinger also can be ordered with optional Atomated Tool Changer.

Can you tell the Stinger is on my wish list.

Steve.

View Frank's profile

Frank

15 posts in 857 days


#11 posted 07-24-2018 12:42 AM

Honestly, that machine looks awfully overpriced. A 200w motor? that’s barely stronger than a Dremel, and 1/3 the power of your standard trim router! Terribly underpowered!

Also, it’s lead screw driven, no ball screw specified so at most you’d get acme screws. Steppers are apparently Nema17, barely enough to move the machine, and that 98ipm isn’t the actual cutting speed you’ll get at any reasonable cutting depth, as that’s the maximum travel speed.

Parts for that machine, excluding the frame, cost at most $500. That doesn’t make sense at all, maybe they made a mistake and meant the spindle is 2000w. Even then, that’s just a couple hundred more.

Things I like:
- Cute frame would look well in an office
- Mechanical parts are hidden (this is actually useful and uncommon in a machine with those specs)
- Aluminum bed

These could add a good $500 more to the value of the machine. Still too little to balance that price:specs ratio.

My recommendation would be to look into CNCRouterParts kits, or even one of the Laguna smaller machines would do better around this price range. Even a chinese (aliexpress) 1212 cnc machine would be far superior.

Am I seeing this wrong? I really can’t see the value in that particular machine.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4291 posts in 2186 days


#12 posted 07-24-2018 01:05 PM

Steve: I really like the Stinger but the price is a stinker.
Frank, thanks for the feedback. I still don’t have a reply from them I may need to contact them via their website instead of here.
I hit a deer on the way to work and probably have to cough up a few G’s to get it fix. CNC will have to wait for now.

-- earthartandfoods.com

View bonesbr549's profile

bonesbr549

1583 posts in 3486 days


#13 posted 07-24-2018 05:59 PM

check out www.cncrouterparts.com. I have the 4×8 and love it. Support is great. The learning curve is steep, but not bad. I’d also recommend the cnc cookbook for calculating feeds n speeds. Biggest part of the learning.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

View mahdee's profile

mahdee

4291 posts in 2186 days


#14 posted 07-24-2018 06:02 PM

Bonesbr549,
Thanks. I did check them out. Looks like the size I was interested in would cost me about 10g’s. I can buy a Shopbot for that.

-- earthartandfoods.com

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