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Forum topic by dakremer posted 07-04-2018 03:19 PM 591 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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dakremer

2742 posts in 3485 days


07-04-2018 03:19 PM

I took apart a free treadmill and salvaged this motor (and a bunch of other goodies). Treadmills have so many useful parts in them! Anyways…..

My electrical knowledge stops at installing an outlet and/or a light fixture. I know next to nothing about motors. I know enough that DC motor won’t work in an AC outlet :) :)

What are my motor control options for making something out of this specific motor (belt sander, use on a lathe, etc, etc)? Are there cheap/reliable DC motor controllers I can purchase online? Would making something be cheaper/better option?

If anyone has experience with this, I’d love some advice. I just don’t want to buy something that’s not right, and blow up my motor….or my shop….or my hands….

-- Hey you dang woodchucks, quit chucking my wood!!!!


11 replies so far

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12810 posts in 2774 days


#1 posted 07-04-2018 03:33 PM

The treadmill will have a controller. Check out the diagram here
http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/2014/11/how-to-get-variable-speed-on-cheap.html?m=1

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7388 posts in 2592 days


#2 posted 07-04-2018 03:52 PM

Yup… everything you need should be included in the treadmill – maybe [1] :)

What treadmill did you get it from. If you absolutely need to get another controller, look for an MC-60 or MC-80. They can be found on flea-bay and other online sources for relatively cheap. The 120v from your wall outlet will connect to the controller, and it will in turn provide the DC current to the motor.

Cheers,
Brad

[1] Not all treadmills have a ready to use out of the box controller and will require some extra circuitry. Older treadmills generally have a better chance of being usable without the need for anything extra.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View BobAnderton's profile

BobAnderton

294 posts in 3184 days


#3 posted 07-04-2018 04:03 PM

The 1HP Leeson DC motor on my Nova lathe is like 8 inch diameter and 12 inches long. These treadmill DC motors are like yours, 2.25 HP and 3” diameter and like 8” long. Do those HP ratings compare directly and relate to the output power the motor can generate in a comparable way?

Sorry, I’ve edited my reply and goofed up the flow of the thread. Earlier I had asked the below, which Brad answered.

If you use the controller board from the treadmill and not the membrane touchpad it s not obvious how to inject a signal to create the desired voltage output from the controller board

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

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MrUnix

7388 posts in 2592 days


#4 posted 07-04-2018 04:24 PM

If you use the controller board from the treadmill and not the membrane touchpad it s not obvious how to inject a signal to create the desired voltage output from the controller board
- BobAnderton

Most of the ones with those ‘membrane’ pads simply have a separate circuit that takes the input from the keys and converts it to a voltage range (0-12v) suitable for input to the controller – but not all.. for example, the newer treadmills that use an MC2100 require an external speed pulse instead of a control voltage. Older ones with either a slider or rotary knob for speed control were just variable resistors (10K pot). Here is a typical wiring diagram for the MC60 (MC80 is similar):

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Woodknack

12810 posts in 2774 days


#5 posted 07-04-2018 05:22 PM



The 1HP Leeson DC motor on my Nova lathe is like 8 inch diameter and 12 inches long. These treadmill DC motors are like yours, 2.25 HP and 3” diameter and like 8” long. Do those HP ratings compare directly and relate to the output power the motor can generate in a comparable way?
- BobAnderton

Motor HP ratings can be complicated. These DC motors are operating at variable speed and variable voltage, they also usually have a heavy flywheel that increases the effective torque so the HP ratings take that into consideration. They also tend to have 2 ratings, continuous and treadmill duty.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Woodknack

12810 posts in 2774 days


#6 posted 07-04-2018 05:24 PM



[1] Not all treadmills have a ready to use out of the box controller and will require some extra circuitry. Older treadmills generally have a better chance of being usable without the need for anything extra.

- MrUnix


How do those work, single speed treadmill?

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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MrUnix

7388 posts in 2592 days


#7 posted 07-04-2018 05:36 PM

How do those work, single speed treadmill?
- Woodknack

I meant as-is for use on something else other than the treadmill… like for the MC2100 controller which would need a pulse circuit to control the speed (rather than a 10K pot) unless you want to bolt the treadmills bulky control panel onto whatever it is you are powering :)

Then you also have the gotchas like one I ran into on one – a 120v three phase motor that required all sorts of fun figuring out how to control its VFD without keeping the control panel and extra logic board attached :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Woodknack

12810 posts in 2774 days


#8 posted 07-04-2018 06:05 PM

The 3ph job, was that a commercial duty treadmill.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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MrUnix

7388 posts in 2592 days


#9 posted 07-04-2018 06:36 PM

The 3ph job, was that a commercial duty treadmill.
- Woodknack

Yeah… it was a Life Fitness model that weighed a ton and built like a tank. Knew something was up with it when I noticed it had a 20A plug on it instead of a 15A one normally found (one horiz., one vert. blade). Mentioned it a while back in this thread Gus started regarding DC motors (specifically, in this post with a follow-up in this one). I wound up selling it to a guy in the next town over, and a discussion of the VFD and how to control it ensued over at the OWWM site in the everything electrical section (in this thread: What options for a 115V 3-phase motor? )

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

22698 posts in 3499 days


#10 posted 07-04-2018 08:32 PM

I hope you saved the electronic parts of the treadmill. The speed controller is in there. They are great motors for feed motors on drum sanders.

Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View tyvekboy's profile

tyvekboy

1904 posts in 3407 days


#11 posted 07-04-2018 09:40 PM

Here are some links that I’ve collected over time that deal with repurposing treadmill motors:

http://www.instructables.com/id/DIY-Pottery-Wheel-Using-Treadmill-motor/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n03JraRgD2k

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8aXyw2OQCT4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PQHrOiOgiTk

Hope these help get you started. Do a search on YouTube for more helpful info.

-- Tyvekboy -- Marietta, GA ………….. one can never be too organized

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