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Worksharp rattling? Arbor runout?

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Forum topic by NeophyteGrant posted 07-01-2018 10:07 PM 525 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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NeophyteGrant

102 posts in 928 days


07-01-2018 10:07 PM

Hi All:

Worksharp is a popular sharpening tool. I primarily use stones, but wanted something that could flatgrind plane irons quicker than granite/AO paper manually.

Anyway, unboxed the WS and I am hearing some slight rattling and appear to see some run-out. To what extent is this normal?

I’ll take a video and post it. I’ll also email their support, but I ordered through Amazon and can have Amazon send something out tonight for tomorrow if need be, no questions asked, so I thought if I had a reason to do so, I’d jump on that ASAP and just exchange it.

Thx.


11 replies so far

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NeophyteGrant

102 posts in 928 days


#1 posted 07-01-2018 10:54 PM

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HokieKen

9950 posts in 1557 days


#2 posted 07-02-2018 05:14 PM

I can’t speak to the rattling based on the video. I will say, the Worksharp isn’t really a super-quiet machine so it’s probably nothing.

As for the runout, it’s typical. I’m not sure what the root cause is but, I feared mine was bad when I first saw it run. And it does have runout at the edge of the disk. But that doesn’t affect function. I put a dial indicator on the face of 2 different glass discs (no sandpaper on them) and it runs true on the top of the disc where the grinding takes place.

In other words, I don’t think you have a problem ;-) And FWIW, if you’re like me, those stones will get used less and less…

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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NeophyteGrant

102 posts in 928 days


#3 posted 07-02-2018 07:00 PM

Thanks Ken!

I touched base with them this morning and they said the same thing. After putting in some more time on it yesterday, I think you’re right on. There is some lateral run-out, but the only thing that matters is that the top runs flat and it doesn’t bob as it rotates, as you mention.

On a side note, I also have a tip for those who get the wide-blade table accessory, as this has been a major point of consternation: there are what look like four foam inserts in the bracket slots that make it exceedingly difficult to seat the table. Removing these helps immensely. If you use a mallet to assist in seating use a rubber one of lower weight with a furring strip or some piece of wood laid diagonally to distribute the blow.

You can also, as another mentioned, raise the glass wheel with a .5” ID, 1” OD washer to level it.

I found I was able to get it level straightaway after I got rid of those strips.

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NeophyteGrant

102 posts in 928 days


#4 posted 07-02-2018 07:01 PM

...And I see myself liking this more as I go on, too. I have a full complement of Shaptons, but I think this will fill a niche for certain things.

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HokieKen

9950 posts in 1557 days


#5 posted 07-02-2018 07:10 PM

Glad you got it sorted out :-) For the price, it’s the best deal going in power sharpening IMHO. I have the wide blade table add-on too and that’s about the only thing I use. I don’t even use the chisel port anymore. The guide and setting jig that come with it are incredible. It would be worth purchasing just to have the guide to use on my stones!

And I ended up taking my Dremel and grinding away some metal around the mounts so I could get the table set properly. I may add a washer to shim the discs up anyway though because it’s still a huge PITA to get it set right if I have to adjust it.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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corelz125

752 posts in 1395 days


#6 posted 07-02-2018 09:22 PM

Mine does the same thing. At first i thought I had a bad one too and contacted them and they said it was normal. I love the machine it does a great job.

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NeophyteGrant

102 posts in 928 days


#7 posted 07-05-2018 06:51 PM

Guys…quick question. Regarding temper and overheating: How close does one get when grinding on a WS low grit to the point of damaging the temper. I’ve read around a bit and follow the fairly intuitive, “when it gets warm near the edge on the back when I’m working a bevel, lift and wait til it’s not warm”.

Is this satisfactory? Loren et al?

I just want to triple-check before I expand on using this as a method to grind back down secondary bevels when they become too big (my primary WS use thus far).

G

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HokieKen

9950 posts in 1557 days


#8 posted 07-05-2018 06:57 PM



Guys…quick question. Regarding temper and overheating: How close does one get when grinding on a WS low grit to the point of damaging the temper. I ve read around a bit and follow the fairly intuitive, “when it gets warm near the edge on the back when I m working a bevel, lift and wait til it s not warm”.

Is this satisfactory? Loren et al?

I just want to triple-check before I expand on using this as a method to grind back down secondary bevels when they become too big (my primary WS use thus far).

G

- NeophyteGrant

It depends on the type of metal but, if your fingers don’t blister, then you haven’t got the tool too hot ;-) I keep a small dish of cool water next to mine when I’m grinding a new bevel and whenever I can feel the steel getting hot, I just dip it in the water, give it a quick wipe on a rag (or, more often, my shirt) and put it right back on the wheel.

That’s for tool steel. For HSS, you couldn’t hurt it if you tried with the Worksharp. I put a pair of thin gloves on to keep from burning my finger tips and go to town.

If you have an old chisel or plane blade, put it on and see how long it takes to blue the edge of the steel. You’ll probably be surprised how long it takes to overheat the steel. Like I said, the limiting factor is more how much your fingers can stand than it is how much the steel can take.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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HokieKen

9950 posts in 1557 days


#9 posted 07-05-2018 07:00 PM

I should also add… keeping the abrasive clean with the rubber cleaning block will go a long way toward not only keeping the steel from overheating but also making the grinding more efficient. Cleaner abrasives cut faster and cooler in any system, Worksharp included.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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corelz125

752 posts in 1395 days


#10 posted 07-05-2018 08:17 PM

Like Ken said i go as long as I can hold it so it never gets blue. I usually sharpen a few things at once so I will just switch to the next piece and let the other cool.

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HokieKen

9950 posts in 1557 days


#11 posted 07-05-2018 08:24 PM

One of the reasons you can have trouble with overheating on a bench grinder (other than the higher speeds involved) is that you’re getting a hollow grind. So, the section just behind the edge is thinner. With the flat surface of the WS, you’re getting a flat bevel so you have extra material in that section. That helps with heat transfer away from the cutting edge.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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