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Forum topic by Rink posted 07-01-2018 06:57 PM 2324 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Rink

122 posts in 456 days


07-01-2018 06:57 PM

I came home yesterday with a lathe. The fellow I bought it from told me that his dad bought it for him in 1944, he used it for about 5 years and never used it again. It’s a 1944 Delta 1460 in fantastic shape. It came with a freestanding cast iron stand which I assume is to turn bowls on the end. It came with a 1/2 HP motor, a Jacob’s chuck, the connectors(?) to be able to mount bowls and legs onto the lathe, and some grinding wheels. If and when he finds his turning tools, I’ll get those also.

So… I’ve only been instructed and used a lathe once and I know what I don’t know and, I’m sure, don’t know what I don’t know. So I have some intro questions:

If I have to buy some woodturning tools, and don’t want crap but don’t want to start out by spending a lot, would the $50 Harbor Freight tools be a good beginning set?

The motor and pulleys don’t match up. In other words, when I set the pulley to the slowest speed and the fastest speed the pulley is too loose one way and too tight the other. Not sure what to do about that. Would it be worth it to start over with a new motor (or use the existing motor) and convert to electric variable speed? What’s the best (and easiest!) way to do that?

Learning – I’m thinking that I should watch all the how-to YouTube videos I can find. Any suggestions?


17 replies so far

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Rink

122 posts in 456 days


#1 posted 07-01-2018 07:08 PM

I thought of another question. The thread on the outboard side (where he had the grinding wheel) is slightly different than the inboard side. The face plate for bowls fits on the inside, but not the outside. Is the outside thread for grinding wheels only? Do I need an adapter of some sort?

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Woodknack

12842 posts in 2799 days


#2 posted 07-01-2018 07:33 PM

The outboard side has a work arbor attached and under that should be a 1” spindle with left hand threads. Delta made universal faceplates that worked on both left and right hand threads.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Woodknack

12842 posts in 2799 days


#3 posted 07-01-2018 07:42 PM

I would, and did, convert to variable speed. I used a treadmill motor but there are other ways. On my blog, link in sig, there is a list of woodturning YouTube channels and a poorly written article on using a treadmill motor for variable speed.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Wildwood

2672 posts in 2553 days


#4 posted 07-01-2018 08:34 PM

From what you said about owner providing tools when he finds them. Probably carbon steel which not bad but majority of us use M2 high speed tool these days.

Better to buy tools linked from store or PSI web site versus online. Message board gurus recommend these two HF spindle tool sets:

https://www.harborfreight.com/professional-high-speed-steel-wood-turning-set-8-pc-61794.html

https://www.harborfreight.com/Professional-High-Speed-Steel-Wood-Lathe-Chisel-Set-8-Pc-69723.html

But not this set:
https://www.harborfreight.com/wood-lathe-turning-tool-kit-8-pc-62674.html

Don’t buy miniature tools; better to buy individual full size tools as you need them.

https://www.pennstateind.com/store/woodturning-tools.html

Sounds like need a new belt or adust pulleys hard to say not looking at what you have in front of you. Some models came with a counter shaft.

As close as can come to your lathe, might check out vintagemachinery.org for different pub.

http://www.vintagemachinery.org/pubs/1141/3234.pdf

Other Delta pubs!
http://www.vintagemachinery.org/mfgindex/detail.aspx?id=1141&tab=3

Not sure what is going on with outboard spindle looking at the picture. Normally see different threads than what’s on inboard spindle so not sure what have on there. Would not worry about outboard turning starting out. You can turn bowls inboard whether use faceplate or get a chuck.

-- Bill

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Wildwood

2672 posts in 2553 days


#5 posted 07-01-2018 08:42 PM

Just starting out don’t need to break the bank buying turning tools. Those inexpense tool vendors Harbor Freight (spindle sets) and PSI tools will get you turning and learning to sharpen your tools. You don’t want to turn bowls with spindle tools definitely want a bowl gouge or two for that.

You can get a free catalogs and compare prices of individual tools, but to many vendors to list selling turning tools and other accessories.

http://www.packardwoodworks.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=CTGY&Category_Code=tools

https://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/

-- Bill

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Rink

122 posts in 456 days


#6 posted 07-07-2018 03:49 AM

Thanks for the input, guys. I’ve been doing some researching and agonizing.

I’m thinking that whatever I do to get the pulley system going may be penny-wise, pound foolish. I was trying to be cheap, but I’m coming to the conclusion that spending more and having a good result is the way to go. I’m now thinking of getting a 1hp 3 phase motor and a VFD. Better power, no manual pulley changes, and easy speed changes. I’m still slightly queasy about replacing the current pulley (taking off and reinstalling the headstock), wiring the motor and VFD, and getting the right pulley wheel size for the motor so that the lathe speeds are in the correct range. Well, it’s all a learning process, isn’t it?

I’ll probably go with one of the PSI chisel sets, since there are both spindle and bowl tools included.

And talk about your money pits! I’ve also come to realize the importance of tool sharpening and that it’s probably necessary to get a Wolverine jig or something like it.

I had thought I was buying a lathe and tools cheap and I was going to just start turning.

What I thought:
Working lathe and tools $200

The reality:
Lathe $200
1hp motor and VFD $250
Chisels $90
Sharpening jig $150
$700 total (but there will be more, won’t there?)

Again, any advice appreciated. I’m just feeling my way along here.

David

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MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#7 posted 07-07-2018 04:06 AM

Why don’t you just get the right sized stepped pulley for the motor? A three phase motor + VFD is nice, but you still should use stepped pulleys so you can maintain the motor at as close to max speed as possible – otherwise, it won’t move enough air to keep cool, which reduces its life significantly. If it were mine, I’d try to get it back to as close to original as possible.

Probably even easier (and cheaper) would be to use the pulley you have now and just make the motor mount adjustable to account for the differences in diameters, such as on a hinge with a tension spring.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: There are a couple of stepped pulleys shown in your picture… are you sure you don’t have two matching pulleys? What are the step diameters of the ones you have?

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Rink

122 posts in 456 days


#8 posted 07-07-2018 05:02 AM

Brad, I do have the pulley wheel that matches the wheel in the headstock. The problem is that the matching wheel only fits motors with 1/2” shafts that are 3” long. Motors these days that are 1/2 hp and above all seem to have at least a 5/8” shaft.

I thought about having a larger hole bored into the wheel, but I don’t know if that’s possible or even where to go to find out. I emailed two machine shops to ask and they didn’t even respond. Probably don’t want to be bothered.

David

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Wildwood

2672 posts in 2553 days


#9 posted 07-07-2018 10:19 AM

Not sure can stay with dollar figure posted buying new 1 HP motor, VFD & controller, but could be wrong too. Of course might want to look into tread mill conversion if want to stay 110V versus 220V.

I am with Brad lot simpler to stay what you have now given the age of that lathe. That ½ HP motor is plenty of power for that lathe.

My old Jet 1642 came with complete 110V, EVS set up and only problem ever had is replacing the on/off switch. So not much help with lathe conversion!

Good luck with it!

-- Bill

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Steve

1356 posts in 1001 days


#10 posted 07-07-2018 12:19 PM

Only using a lathe once, I would recommend getting it running and try some turning with one of those HF tool sets first before you start buying all sorts of upgrades and other add ons.

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Rink

122 posts in 456 days


#11 posted 07-07-2018 01:39 PM

If I could get the wheel with 1/2” hole bored to 5/8”, I could get going with what I have.

What if I put the wheel in my drill press, do my best to line it up perfectly, and use a 5/8” drill bit? Do I have a decent chance of success? What metal are those old pulleys made out of anyway? Will a regular hss bit work?

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TheDane

5654 posts in 4082 days


#12 posted 07-07-2018 02:28 PM

What if I put the wheel in my drill press, do my best to line it up perfectly, and use a 5/8” drill bit? Do I have a decent chance of success?

Just my humble opinion, but it would be dumb luck if you got it close enough to work. Better to either find a machinist or buy another pulley.

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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Woodknack

12842 posts in 2799 days


#13 posted 07-07-2018 05:20 PM

You have nothing to lose, use a 1/2” drill bit to center the pully, change bits and drill it out. Clamp that sucker good so it can’t move, because even a little movement and it’s ruined. I wouldn’t want to be more than about $400-450 in the lathe to get it running. But if you like it and keep it then the amount of money is less important.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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Rink

122 posts in 456 days


#14 posted 07-25-2018 07:30 PM

Here’s my update and continuing saga:

I resolved the 5/8” shaft to 1/2” pulley problem with one of these: https://www.ebay.com/itm/SHAFT-Step-Down-Coupling-5-8-X-1-2-2-Long-Shaft-1-Pc/112775640451?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649

I hooked everything up and used a tachometer to test the speeds I got with the 4 pulley changes:
The motor itself, rated as 1725rpm, runs at 1800 rpm.
The pulley speeds are 965, 1450, 2200 and 3300.
These speeds are too fast for bowl turning, which brings on the next problem – how to get slower speeds.

The lathe came with extra pulley wheels, but no way to mount them. But I have an old grinder that someone gave me a long time ago that has a motor, a pulley and what’s pictured here.

My plan is to use a new 5/8” shaft (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0025PXNRK) and set up like this, with the motor mounted above and upside down (the pulleys are not actually mounted, which is why they are crooked). Hopefully I can then actually start turning!

I did follow advice given here of joining the local woodturning group, which is NJ Woodturners for me. I took a lesson from Bob, who is also a lumberjock. Great teacher and generous with his time and knowledge. I got to turn my first bowl! I have ideas and wood and can’t wait to get started.

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MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#15 posted 07-25-2018 07:56 PM

The use of an intermediate jackshaft with stepped pulleys is fairly common and will get you a much wider range of speeds. Here is the setup from a 1950 Delta catalog:

I’ve seen them the other way around as well, with the jack-shaft up under the lathe, and the motor mounted down on the shelf below. Either will work just fine.

As for motor speed – 4 pole electric motors @60hz have a no-load speed of 1800 rpm, but are typically labeled as 1725 (or 1750) rpm. A 2 pole motor no-load speed is 3600 rpm, but typically labeled as 3450. So once you put a load on the motor, it will slow down a bit. You can do bowls with the setup you have – 900 rpm is not too outrageous as long as you start off relatively in balance. My little Delta has roughly the same speed range and I’ve done a bunch of bowls without any problems on it. Getting past the initial rounding is the only rough time :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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