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Where should I place my Air Filter?

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Forum topic by LucasWoods posted 06-29-2018 11:43 PM 1274 views 0 times favorited 22 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LucasWoods

448 posts in 1753 days


06-29-2018 11:43 PM

I recently got the WEN 3 Speed Remote control air filtration system Model 3410. I was wondering the best placement for the system. I know it depends on the size and layout of your shop so I attached the below crappy drawing. I am thinking of placing it above the workbench. Which there is enough room between the wall and the fluorescent light for it to fit.

I read that the unit should be only a few inches from the wall and placed close to a corner as to promote circular air flow.

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF


22 replies so far

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2829 days


#1 posted 06-30-2018 01:57 AM

Thing to do here is analyze airflow in your shop. Consider where you make the most dust and of course how you intend to power the unit. When I placed mine I used my vape and blew smoke into the air where I do the most work. Watching the smoke I found where it collected and hung in the air. Then took a small fan to mimic the air filter and repeated and watched where it went after that. Seeing it blew toward the main vent fan on the far wall quite well I installed it. Power was already available in that spot so just ran some wire and made an outlet.

Go ahead and get some filters extra to have on hand, pays off when you need to change one. I blow the outer one out once a month for 3 months then change it. Moderate use only. The inner filter I have only blown out once this year, had very little on it.

Here is mine:

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

6570 posts in 3615 days


#2 posted 06-30-2018 02:12 AM

I hung mine over my two table saws in the middle of the shop…My shop is 2,000 sq.ft., so I figured that was the best spot to place it….It is central to all the machines, and picks up any floating micros floating around…...

-- " At my age, happy hour is a 2 hour nap".....!!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3554 posts in 1808 days


#3 posted 06-30-2018 12:51 PM

I have the same unit and I don’t think it moves enough air by itself especially in to create an airflow pattern so I would probably just hang it where it is most convenient or least in the way. This time of year I always have a fan running which helps keep the air moving and the dust aloft until it gets filtered.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Firewood's profile

Firewood

847 posts in 2054 days


#4 posted 06-30-2018 01:11 PM

Based on the drawing alone, I thin my first choice would be along the wall between the DC and DP. clean air moving toward the DP. that would pull dust away from the TS. Putting it close to the wall creates a more circular airflow. Just my 2ยข.

-- Mike - Waukesha, WI

View onoitsmatt's profile

onoitsmatt

433 posts in 1596 days


#5 posted 06-30-2018 02:01 PM

I had mine above my bench but found that I was always smacking my project into it if they were longish and I wasn’t paying attention.

-- Matt - Phoenix, AZ

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2379 days


#6 posted 06-30-2018 02:03 PM

Thanks for that picture of your shop, Rick. Now most of us are depressed and realize that our lame garage workshop is an indication of our failures in life.

Kidding. Looks amazing!

Good question COS guy! I am near Fox Run, just north of the USAFA myself. I was thinking of adding one of these as well. My DC has the 2-micron canister and in the winter months, a DC would help with the rest of the stuff that floats around. This time of year, the doors are open!

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View Rick  Dennington's profile

Rick Dennington

6570 posts in 3615 days


#7 posted 06-30-2018 02:46 PM

Thanks for the kind words on my shop, Bronco…I appreciate it…!! I really think that placing the air cleaner (some call it an air scrubber) is up to the individual as to where they hang it to get the best results for their shop….No two shops are going to be the same size, or configured the same, so whatever and wherever it works is just a matter of choice…..!!

-- " At my age, happy hour is a 2 hour nap".....!!

View clin's profile

clin

1039 posts in 1416 days


#8 posted 06-30-2018 04:13 PM

No matter what you do, you will not have high enough air speed throughout your shop to prevent much of the dust from settling out of the air before it can circulate back to the filter.

The exhaust air will be a relatively high speed column of air due to the momentum of the air. While on the intake side the air is drawn from a very wide area. So intake air speed just a few feet from the unit will be very low. Bottom the exhaust side can ‘throw’ the air farther across the shop. The intake will suck in air only near the intake. So probably best to locate the unit towards one end of the room blowing out towards the length of the room. I’ve heard locating it about 1/3 the length and blowing towards the other 2/3 of the space to be good.

Exhaust air wil be clean air, so if there is something that should stay clean, it would be better to point it in that direction. In my case, my filter points towards my minisplit AC unit.

Since the intake side will not draw air at high speed for a significant distance, place the intake near the major dust producer. Often this is the table saw. That way the dust doesn’t have far to travel and more will get drawn into the filter before settling out.

I think these types of filters work great at keeping the air clean. But they don’t get all the dust your D.C. misses. Much can still settle on surfaces before it can be filtered. So don’t expect it to keep you shop dust free.

I do think they work best for the very fine dust that settles out more slowly. This is also the most harmful dust to breathe so that’s a good thing. I have a particle counter and my room filter can bring the count down to near zero after working and keep it low while working. Though I still wear a respirator while working with a machine, since some dust is being spewed right into my face. I do not have a D.C. Just a shop vac.

I also tend to run the filter anytime I’m n the shop, not just when using machines. Just moving around the shop kicks up dust that has settled and puts it into the air.

-- Clin

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

875 posts in 2379 days


#9 posted 06-30-2018 04:51 PM

Curious.

Would it make sense to move the air filter near the dust collector? If the DC unit is blowing air and letting the finest dust out into the room, why not pick it up with the second level of filtering there. Maybe even enclosing the DC some to get more of the air into the filter.

DC on most of my tools is excellent. The Incra Clean Sweep handles the router table well, the saw and jointer may through some chips depending on the cut, but not much, and I use a Festool sanding setup which also does great.

Seems to me the most dangerous dust source in the room is the giant blower that cannot stop small particles.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7789 posts in 3334 days


#10 posted 06-30-2018 05:12 PM

I started to locate mine with the 1/3—2/3 location along the long wall but ended up locating it at the 1/2 way point along the long wall (about where the arrow points in my drawing). My shop is 24’x30’ = 720sq.ft.

I basically located the air filtration opposite my TS, DC, and and jointer. This made the best sense in my case and it does a fine job where it is located.

Good luck with your project, and be careful while on ladders. Me & ladders don’t get along too well… ;-)


Here is my thread on my air filter project.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View 000's profile

000

2859 posts in 1319 days


#11 posted 06-30-2018 11:11 PM

1st, I have no scientific knowledge to back this up.

I’m thinking keeping it away from the major dust makers.
That will only clog up the filters faster.
The fine particles are what you want to collect, the heavy particles will settle on there own.

I think the fine dust will float around more towards the back of the shop,
where there is not as much air circulation, compared to by the garage door or outside man door.
Depends on how you work, with them open or not.

I picked over the bench,
figuring this is where the small fine sanding may be done and the dust can float up and be picked up right away.

Take with a grain of salt, because I have no idea what would actually be best!

View ocean's profile

ocean

164 posts in 1253 days


#12 posted 07-01-2018 12:46 AM

I agree that the total air flow into the air filter is on the low end and therefore I pointed mine at the number one dust maker in my shop – the tablesaw. One week of moderate to heavy use will require me to clean or replace the outer filter. It certainly helps in the total dust control as I do not have a large dust collector but it’s greatest advantage is that it prevents clogging up the A/C filter.

-- Bob, FL Keys

View LucasWoods's profile

LucasWoods

448 posts in 1753 days


#13 posted 07-01-2018 01:46 AM

So I think I am going to place the filter above the workbench which is close to the table saw and have the clean air exhausting towards the garage door (long wall of the shop) and then I have a box fan where should I place it? In the bottoms left of the shop, bottom right? And place it so it helps to circulate the air better and keeps dust particles in the air so the air filter cleans as much as possible.

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2829 days


#14 posted 07-01-2018 01:56 AM



1st, I have no scientific knowledge to back this up.

I m thinking keeping it away from the major dust makers.
That will only clog up the filters faster.
The fine particles are what you want to collect, the heavy particles will settle on there own.

I think the fine dust will float around more towards the back of the shop,
where there is not as much air circulation, compared to by the garage door or outside man door.
Depends on how you work, with them open or not.

I picked over the bench,
figuring this is where the small fine sanding may be done and the dust can float up and be picked up right away.

Take with a grain of salt, because I have no idea what would actually be best!

- jbay

Expanding on this idea try this. Make a stand for the unit. Move it around the shop and do your work and see what works well. Like jbay I am no expert but trial and error I am good at. LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

6223 posts in 2624 days


#15 posted 07-01-2018 09:12 AM

The filter ideally should be between the source of the dust and your lungs to provide the most efficient benefit to the operator.
Trapping the fine particles before the operator breaths them in is what is required, now so as this is obviously impractical to implement, just wear a dust mask.

If it is located above and away from the operator little benefit to the operator will result, and the ongoing maintenance task of cleaning the filters to allow effective air flow will be required, along with the consideration of the additional noise factor.

Ongoing maintenance: Warning if you maintain it you wil be subjected to very high concentrated amounts of very fine dust, the very dust that you are trying to prevent inhaling, far in excess of the work area exposure so definately suit up and mask up when doing so.

If the filter is just for attempting to provide cleaner air I guess the above air flow comments by other LJs would be a good consideration.

On a positive note they do work, and they work very well, if turned on, and constantly maintained.

If it was I, I would be placing it on ebay. ( otherwise portable would be the best use and for the servicability aspects.)

My disclaimer: All from somebody who doesnt have a workshop

-- Regards Rob

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