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Finishing pine guitar amp cabinet

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Forum topic by Cfarris87 posted 06-28-2018 07:35 PM 698 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Cfarris87

2 posts in 386 days


06-28-2018 07:35 PM

So I’ve been refinishing my old pine guitar cabinet. The tolex covering was separating and peeling off. Over the years a bit of moisture had gotten behind it and softened the wood a bit and turned a dark brown color. Not sure what to actually call it, but I was able to sand a lot of it down but there’s a few spots mainly on the edges that seem to be affected all the way through. I used prestain, cut the grain down, and the stain looks great. Just a little discoloration. The problem comes from the finish. I tried some polycrylic and love the natural look of the finish but on those spots it’s got a very cloudy finish. I’ve sanded with 400 between coats and have covered with at least 8 coats now and it’s still there. I don’t think adding anymore coats is going to help. Has anyone experienced this or have any advice on how to proceed at this point? Or could adding a different finish over the polycrylic cover it up? Sorry for the long post, not much of a wood worker here. Just trying to finish up a fun little project. Thanks!


6 replies so far

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clin

1039 posts in 1415 days


#1 posted 06-29-2018 12:23 AM

I’m not a finishing expert. I’m sure one will be along shortly. But I suspect it is moisture. Especially since you said moisture got in there. I suspect you’ll need to remove the finish and allow the wood to dry out for a significant length of time. Weeks or maybe months assuming it was wet a long time and the moisture has fully penetrated. Less of course if the moisture is only near the surface.

How long after you removed the tolex before you applied the finish?

Now, as a guitar guy. I’ve got to say you’re doing it all wrong. Get tweed on that amp!

Just kidding of course. But nothing looks better than a lacquered tweed cabinet.

And welcome to LJ’s.

-- Clin

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Cfarris87

2 posts in 386 days


#2 posted 06-29-2018 12:37 AM

You know, that hadn’t crossed my mind, but I’m sure that’s it. Which sucks cause I need to get it back in action! It’s hard to disagree with laqured tweed! It’s a 74 Super so I didn’t want to tweed it. Wanted something a little different but close to original. The ebony sail looks fantastic on it. Guess I’ll have to sand it down and put her back together while it dries out. Thanks for the insight!

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JCamp

986 posts in 969 days


#3 posted 06-29-2018 01:24 AM

I’d say it’s moisture as well. With wood that size you might be able to get it in the same room with a dehumidifier or put a fan on it and assist in it drying out. Not sure how long but I’d think mayb a week of doing either or both of those would really help it. If you’d do something like that on thin wood you’d run the risk of it drying to fast and cracking but on that pine I’d think you could swing it

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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Kazooman

1325 posts in 2371 days


#4 posted 06-29-2018 02:03 AM

I own several of those old amps. I agree that yours is made out of old pine. They all were and the wood is not pretty. It never was and was never intended to have a natural finish. What I can’t really see is trying to turn that old pine into something it was never meant to be. If you want a sweet looking natural wood cabinet I think you will need to start fresh with some sweet looking wood. Otherwise, I suggest reapplying the Tolex. It will look great!

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clin

1039 posts in 1415 days


#5 posted 06-29-2018 02:46 AM



You know, that hadn t crossed my mind, but I m sure that s it. Which sucks cause I need to get it back in action! It s hard to disagree with laqured tweed! It s a 74 Super so I didn t want to tweed it. Wanted something a little different but close to original. The ebony sail looks fantastic on it. Guess I ll have to sand it down and put her back together while it dries out. Thanks for the insight!

- Cfarris87

I like the idea of sanding it down, and then just put it back together and use it until you are sure it’s dry. It’s certainly not that hard to pull the guts back out again later.

-- Clin

View ruger's profile

ruger

112 posts in 514 days


#6 posted 06-30-2018 01:18 AM

I had a 66 fender bandmaster i purchased with paper route money from washington music center in DC. few months later it was burnt to the ground during the riots in D.C. that inventory would be price less today.

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