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Forum topic by paulmon posted 06-28-2018 05:41 AM 873 views 1 time favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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paulmon

68 posts in 558 days


06-28-2018 05:41 AM

I haven’t played with concrete much in the past, but I decided to build some molds in the shop and make some pavers and bricks. Here are some of my first tries.

https://youtu.be/xqi3VLQAH9A


20 replies so far

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MrUnix

7409 posts in 2621 days


#1 posted 06-28-2018 06:01 AM

Try coating the inside of your mold with some used motor oil to help getting them out… and as you found out, having one side removable helps a lot! I’ve made hundreds of bricks to use as pavers and steps, but with some doctored up concrete (google Hypertufa) to make them look more like natural hand carved stone. Also good for making faux rock, lawn grots and planters. Fun stuff but lots of work!

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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paulmon

68 posts in 558 days


#2 posted 06-28-2018 02:17 PM

I can see this could grow into something akin to an addiction!

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John Smith

1889 posts in 585 days


#3 posted 06-28-2018 04:18 PM

Paul – I made a two-part fiberglass mold for my sister-in-law
that wanted the custom flower bed borders.
my brother only made 3 castings then went to the Big Box Store
and bought her a truck full of pavers. {case closed}.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2831 days


#4 posted 06-29-2018 12:52 AM

For a decorative look on the sides you can use embossed wallpaper border. Spray with vegetable oil before pouring in. Let dry a few days then take mold apart. Little corner work and you have a reverse of the original design.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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paulmon

68 posts in 558 days


#5 posted 06-29-2018 12:53 AM

Ha! Yea, I can definitely see that. There’s not a lot of money to be saved by doing it yourself.


Paul – I made a two-part fiberglass mold for my sister-in-law
that wanted the custom flower bed borders.
my brother only made 3 castings then went to the Big Box Store
and bought her a truck full of pavers. {case closed}.

- John Smith


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paulmon

68 posts in 558 days


#6 posted 06-29-2018 01:06 AM

The possibilities are endless!


For a decorative look on the sides you can use embossed wallpaper border. Spray with vegetable oil before pouring in. Let dry a few days then take mold apart. Little corner work and you have a reverse of the original design.

- woodbutcherbynight


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bandit571

23215 posts in 3106 days


#7 posted 06-29-2018 01:20 AM

Ah yes, the smell of Form Oil in the morning…..too many years doing that sort of thing…..

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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corelz125

758 posts in 1399 days


#8 posted 06-29-2018 11:58 PM

Did you get any nice wood grain patterns on the brick?

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squazo

124 posts in 2068 days


#9 posted 06-30-2018 12:34 AM

Look into rapid set products made by cts. They are more expensive and won’t make sense for what your doing but they are fun to play with. Check out concrete plasticizer as well as water reducers. You can get some for free from the fritz pack website (tottaly free not even shipping). You can save a lot of money by making concrete out if cement sand and gravel. It’s about one seventh the cost of bagged concrete, if you buy the sand and gravel by the yard. I dabbled in concrete countertops for a while and now I’m hooked.

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bandit571

23215 posts in 3106 days


#10 posted 06-30-2018 12:37 AM

Line the forms with plastic, make sure it is free of wrinkles…..makes a smooth block.

My Dad had an Uncle…..Uncle John was rather frugal….seems rather than BUY the blocks to build a large garage/shop…he cast all the blocks himself. Normal wood roof. Was done back in the 1940s….still standing today. And still in use.

You might try a palm sander, doesn’t really need paper on it..to vibrate the voids out. Air pockets, that is. Just run it around the outsides of the form. Can even be a cheapo sander from Harbor Freight….

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

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jmkeuning

16 posts in 2730 days


#11 posted 06-30-2018 02:04 AM

I was a a guy’s house buying a piece of slate from a Craigslist ad. I noticed that he had a really cool wall around his yard. It looked like some 10’x10’ repeating panels… It reminded me of walls on some Greek island. I asked him about it and he opened his garage. He had built a gigantic 10’x10’ concrete mold that was standing on a seriously robust stand that had a sort of axle in the middle. I can’t even explain it. The thing was designed so that you lay the mold flat and fill it with concrete, the screw a face on it, and then spin it around on this axle to distribute the concrete into all of the nooks and crannies.

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paulmon

68 posts in 558 days


#12 posted 06-30-2018 02:29 AM



Did you get any nice wood grain patterns on the brick?

- corelz125

Not really. I read where you need to sandblast the wood to remove the softer part of the grain if you want to do that.

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paulmon

68 posts in 558 days


#13 posted 06-30-2018 02:31 AM

I can see right now that there will have to be a sequel to my video.

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builtinbkyn

2939 posts in 1363 days


#14 posted 06-30-2018 04:03 AM



Ah yes, the smell of Form Oil in the morning…..too many years doing that sort of thing…..

- bandit571


Being the low man on the totem pole and the oiler made me go back to school. Well, mucking around in the mud 12’ below grade, was pretty influential too lol

-- Bill, Yo!......in Brooklyn & Steel City :)

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playingwithmywood

444 posts in 2020 days


#15 posted 06-30-2018 05:05 AM


Did you get any nice wood grain patterns on the brick?

- corelz125

Not really. I read where you need to sandblast the wood to remove the softer part of the grain if you want to do that.

- paulmon

Miratec has some good grain in it naturally well naturally manmade even though the big box stores do not normally have it you can get it 12” wide

also LPsmartside has some deep grain panels I am think mainly of the shaker LP siding panels they are much deeper than the Miratec but they look good together

so that might be good for the finished side of your form you would just need to seal them good and use some sort of release but I think they would both hold up good for what you are doing as long as it was not the structural part of the form

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