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Shallow angles on thin pieces

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Forum topic by tonychanman posted 06-27-2018 04:38 AM 448 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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tonychanman

14 posts in 1135 days


06-27-2018 04:38 AM

Hi all, I am going to be tackling a project in the near future for some awkwardly shaped pieces. I’ve thought about how to cut them from all different angles (pun intended) but am a bit puzzled as to the best approach.

The pieces are 11”x11” at 2” thick made out of MDF.

The bottom 3/4” is a square block which then tapers inwards into a geometric shape. I need to make many many of these to make up a wall panel.

The shape is too tall to put through the table saw, my blade only goes 3.5” high and the long bevel is more than 7”.

I don’t have a bandsaw, but am willing to get one if needed because I have to make so many pieces as well as it would be a useful addition to my shop.

Here’s the shape in question:

I’m thinking I may need to build a jig that’s on an angle and shave away the excess material with a router sled.

Any advise is appreciated.


16 replies so far

View Hammerthumb's profile

Hammerthumb

2943 posts in 2369 days


#1 posted 06-27-2018 05:08 AM

I have no advise for fabrication, but have used wall tile with this geometric format. I can’t remember the manufacturer, but you should be able to fix nd it doing some google searches. Having a premade, prefinished cast piece would be a lot easier.

-- Paul, Duvall, WA

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tonychanman

14 posts in 1135 days


#2 posted 06-27-2018 07:29 AM

I have tried that but haven’t been able to find anyone to supply this type of shape. It’s also somewhat time sensitive so I can’t wait for months to have them made from scratch somewhere else to match my customers’ dimensions.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1834 posts in 556 days


#3 posted 06-27-2018 11:40 AM

Tony – when you say you have many to make – how many do you actually need ?
and – is this a one time deal or do you anticipate doing more in the future ?
since you are using MDF, assuming they will be painted ??

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View putty's profile

putty

1272 posts in 2000 days


#4 posted 06-27-2018 12:14 PM

could you cut 3 sides on the table saw,
then make an angled sled to use in the planer for the larger angle

-- Putty

View Robert's profile

Robert

3403 posts in 1874 days


#5 posted 06-27-2018 01:35 PM

Well my first thought was also a router sled.

But I think my answer is going to be “time to buy a bandsaw”.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View Bill_Steele's profile

Bill_Steele

515 posts in 2125 days


#6 posted 06-27-2018 02:09 PM

I don’t have a clear picture about what I would build—but I’m thinking a jig or several used with the bandsaw to remove the majority or waste. The jig could be something with interchangeable parts to achieve different angles. then either the same jig or something different used in the thickness planer or drum sander or with a belt sander to smooth out the bandsaw cuts. Do you have a belt sander with a sanding frame?

A router sled would probably work as well—but I think each tile would take longer to make and may still need to be smoothed out (e.g. overlapping lines from removing waste) after routing.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1834 posts in 556 days


#7 posted 06-27-2018 02:29 PM

I designed and mass produced some sign post caps similar to your design.
I made a master pattern and found a company that would
make a rubber mold and used High Density Urethane (HDU) expanding
foam with a very hard surface and factory primed ready for paint.
each and every item will be an exact copy – so the original must be perfect.
yes, there is a time frame involved. but once the mold is made, the turn-around
time for the copies is less than 10 days.
when I was using the caps, my minimum order was 25 each to make it financially affordable.
if this is an option for your project, you would have to contact the company yourself
to discuss the financials and processing times.
it would sure beat hours and hours and hours messing with MDF dust all over the place.
but – if you are going to seal and clear coat the items, the HDU will not work as it is not
a wood item and will be primed white when you get it – ready for the paint of your choice.

your item:

my post caps:

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

220 posts in 391 days


#8 posted 06-27-2018 02:43 PM

Tony,
Do you have a jointer? A 6” jointer would do this very quickly.(8” would be even better.) You would need to rig a simple clamping sled then use the opposite steeper angle on the fence to direct the shallow angle across the knives.

A bandsaw would probably do more harm than good because the tracking would need to be perfect and most bandsaws aren’t.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

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tonychanman

14 posts in 1135 days


#9 posted 06-27-2018 06:54 PM

Yes I have a jointer, a smlal 6”. I also have a planer but I have heard that MDF can ruin the blades on a planer.

I thought a bandsaw would be the best option, to laminate 2 pieces of 1” thick MDF together into a solid block, then build a jig to hold the pieces in place and run it through the band saw on an angle. Using ultralight MDF shouldn’t cause much blade wander I would hope.

I would be making about 150 of these pieces in total.

View tonychanman's profile

tonychanman

14 posts in 1135 days


#10 posted 06-27-2018 06:56 PM

Thanks John, I’ll look into that option. They will need to be painted and smooth, but will not be getting clear coat.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1834 posts in 556 days


#11 posted 06-27-2018 07:08 PM

the HDU comes in pretty high density that is much, much lighter and easier
to work with than MDF. extremely friendly with all woodworking tools.
you can get it in 2” thick 4×8’ sheets which would not require the glue up.
I can arrange some free samples sent to you if you would like to explore that option
of making your own.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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tonychanman

14 posts in 1135 days


#12 posted 06-27-2018 08:38 PM

That would be great! Samples would be awesome. I’m located in Canada though, hopefully that doesn’t make much of a difference.

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John Smith

1834 posts in 556 days


#13 posted 06-27-2018 08:56 PM

Canada ???? ummmmmmm yeah, anything shipped to Canada makes a difference.
especially if I send you some samples of something that you can’t buy in your area.
Please shed some light on what town you are in and zip code and I will try to figure out a “Plan B”.
I just can not imagine cutting 150 of anything out of MDF !! really messy material to work with.

If you can also explain a little more about the accent wall you are building, will help with
some more accurate feedback. . . . if this wall will be out of reach of the general public, etc.
residential or commercial building, permanent or temporary build.

another option would be to make a rubber mold and mass produce the tiles out of Plaster of Paris.

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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tonychanman

14 posts in 1135 days


#14 posted 06-27-2018 08:58 PM

Right, I realize the price will be different which is why I’m looking to get these fabricated myself. I’m just hoping that the price difference isn’t enormous.

I’m located near Vancouver, postal code V3K 6X9.

Yeah I really hate working with MDF.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2241 posts in 3032 days


#15 posted 06-27-2018 09:02 PM

+1


could you cut 3 sides on the table saw,
then make an angled sled to use in the planer for the larger angle

- putty


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