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What operations do you use your hand planes for?

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Forum topic by weekendwoodguy posted 06-26-2018 05:07 PM 1251 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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weekendwoodguy

16 posts in 609 days


06-26-2018 05:07 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question milling hand plane

I have 2 mediocre hand planes and I don’t use them much. I’m sure there’s lots of operations that could be helped out by the use of a hand plane like using them with shooting boards or chamfering edges etc.

I’m curious what are the things that most often send you reaching for a hand plane?


13 replies so far

View LittleShaver's profile

LittleShaver

599 posts in 1181 days


#1 posted 06-26-2018 06:04 PM

Jointing edges
Chamfering
Shooting ends
Router Plane for tenons, lap joints, cleaning grooves
Thicknessing and smoothing

-- Sawdust Maker

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10859 posts in 2048 days


#2 posted 06-26-2018 10:00 PM

Ditto with the exception of jointing edges.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

921 posts in 1538 days


#3 posted 06-26-2018 10:51 PM

all depends on which planes you have

View jayseedub's profile

jayseedub

139 posts in 2527 days


#4 posted 06-26-2018 11:04 PM

Mostly for jointing edges and chamfering.

I have a low-angle block plane, a No. 4 equivalent, and two home-made wooden planes (Jack and Jointer lengths).

Wish I had a low-angle Jack and a shooting board for it.

View DIYWoodGuy's profile

DIYWoodGuy

9 posts in 531 days


#5 posted 06-26-2018 11:16 PM

Joining edges. Shooting endgrain on a shooting board. Chamfering edges. Face joining prior to planing of over 6”.

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

24110 posts in 3245 days


#6 posted 06-26-2018 11:38 PM

Jointing edges
thicknessing after a resaw
clean up dovetail joints after a glue up.
Flattening a glued up panel
Beveling an edge
Making a raised panel
smoothing a surface to be ready for a finish.

Some planes will do rebates, dados, tongue & groove joints, and moldings
Block planes to shoot an end of a board, and knock the sharp edges off the edges of boards.

When I do get rough-sawn lumber, a cambered jack will work it down to where it is closer to S4S stock…

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View weekendwoodguy's profile

weekendwoodguy

16 posts in 609 days


#7 posted 06-27-2018 12:59 AM

For flattening a glued up panel would you use a smoothing plane? Would the dimensions of the wood determine your choice of plane? I’m assuming that you panels would already be pretty flat before glue up.

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

1014 posts in 1112 days


#8 posted 06-27-2018 01:23 AM

Even if I didn’t use them I’d still keep some around to look at :)

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

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weekendwoodguy

16 posts in 609 days


#9 posted 06-27-2018 01:27 AM



all depends on which planes you have

- corelz125

I should have said in my original post I have a Stanley Handyman and a no name block plane. They were both my dad’s and I got them free so no complaints here although I know people really don’t like the Handyman line. I sharpened them up on my whetstones but other than chamfering I haven’t done much with them.

View JohnChung's profile

JohnChung

420 posts in 2636 days


#10 posted 06-27-2018 03:21 AM



For flattening a glued up panel would you use a smoothing plane? Would the dimensions of the wood determine your choice of plane? I’m assuming that you panels would already be pretty flat before glue up.

- weekendwoodguy

I will not try so as the sole will get damaged. For smoothers it is very important to have pristine sole.
But it depends on your space and budget. If you have a #4 only then there is no choice. It becomes your
jack plane.

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2450 posts in 2551 days


#11 posted 06-27-2018 12:38 PM



I m curious what are the things that most often send you reaching for a hand plane?

- weekendwoodguy


Replace sandpaper – all surfaces get smoothed with a plane
Flatten panel glue ups – they are never perfectly flat
Joint edges – I dont own a powered jointer, dont need it
Misc – clean up rabbets, ease or chamfer edges, prep turning blanks, etc

I dont use them to dimension lumber – I use a pwr planer

View Sludgeguy's profile

Sludgeguy

57 posts in 684 days


#12 posted 06-27-2018 02:00 PM

As OSU55 said, panel glues are never perfectly flat and the hand plane is usually the tool of choice for flattening.
I use them all the time for this. Typically, a No. 5 and a No. 7.

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 1337 days


#13 posted 06-27-2018 02:07 PM

What? Glue lines will not damage a handplane.

For flattening a glued up panel would you use a smoothing plane? Would the dimensions of the wood determine your choice of plane? I’m assuming that you panels would already be pretty flat before glue up.

- weekendwoodguy

I will not try so as the sole will get damaged. For smoothers it is very important to have pristine sole.
But it depends on your space and budget. If you have a #4 only then there is no choice. It becomes your
jack plane.

- JohnChung


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