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Forum topic by Clarkswoodworking posted 06-25-2018 03:45 PM 764 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Clarkswoodworking

289 posts in 552 days


06-25-2018 03:45 PM

Local ad
$100 for all
Just wondering if anything worth restoring in this group
I cannot tell one from the other
Thanks
Scott


16 replies so far

View JCamp's profile

JCamp

986 posts in 969 days


#1 posted 06-25-2018 03:55 PM

Id say they are all worth the $10 a piece even if just for parts. Some others will likely chime in that can tell you what they are base on the pics but I cant tell

-- Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do it with all thy might

View kkaucher's profile

kkaucher

23 posts in 738 days


#2 posted 06-25-2018 04:01 PM

I’d have to agree with JCamp – $10 each is a fair price – you’d lose nothing and you may find a treasure gleaming in the stack. Will the seller not provide any more detail? That may be worth the effort.

I doubt that it would be much work to restore them. Nothing looks too horribly rusted, not much in the way of physical damage. No funny colors that one might expect on a cheapie plane. I’d go for it just for giggles!

-- A bad day woodworking is better than a good day working. ~Author unknown

View Rich's profile

Rich

4555 posts in 1008 days


#3 posted 06-25-2018 04:06 PM

Looks like junk to me. Missing knob, chipped totes, and what looks to be potentially deep pitting. The transitional plane could be cool with new wood, assuming it cleaned up nicely.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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DBDesigns

220 posts in 416 days


#4 posted 06-25-2018 04:27 PM

If this was on EBAY I would avoid it because the shipping would cost too much to make the price worth while. Also, the photos don’t show the bottoms and sides of the planes very well. Cracks and chips at the mouth basically render the planes unusable.

The wooden jack plane looks like junk. It appears to be badly checked and cracked along the grain of the wood.

There does appear to be a decent number 9 and some decent smoothing planes in the bunch but it doesn’t look like any prizes are in there. Don’t be afraid of rust. It’s easy to remove with vinegar and it hides a lot of good cast iron.

I would say that if you can look at the lot before you pay, it might be worth pursuing. Also, there are a lot of Stanley plane parts available on EBAY for a reasonable price.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View JayT's profile

JayT

6226 posts in 2630 days


#5 posted 06-25-2018 04:28 PM

There’s definitely the value there if you want to do the restorations. I see some that are easily identifiable as Stanley Bailey’s and most are complete.

Learn on the one with the chrome lever cap (least valuable of the lot as I see it) and then progress up to the others. The missing knob is easily replaced by buying or turning one.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View BlasterStumps's profile

BlasterStumps

1325 posts in 858 days


#6 posted 06-25-2018 04:36 PM

What you can’t see matter most and that is if the mouth corners or the heel are broken/cracked.
Top pic: big plane on left looks like it could be a Union. Smaller plane next to it might be a Stanley. Little block plane might be cool. Has a knuckle joint lever cap. Might be an 18. $100 would be a bit of a stretch for me on those. Transitional planes, well…
Mike

-- "I build for function first, looks second. Most times I never get around to looks." - Mike, western Colorado

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

220 posts in 416 days


#7 posted 06-25-2018 04:39 PM

One more thing. If you do choose to restore these or any other quality antique planes, avoid using a wire wheel to remove surface rust and dirt. The natural grain of the iron will disappear and be replaced by a finish that will rust faster. Also, everyone will be able to tell that it was restored with a wire wheel and that makes it less desirable.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5452 posts in 2770 days


#8 posted 06-25-2018 04:39 PM

I’d say it is worth it. Surely you could re-coup the $100 by fixing a few up and reselling them.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

10858 posts in 1905 days


#9 posted 06-25-2018 04:44 PM

All it takes is 2 in good shape. Wire wheels are awesome.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

220 posts in 416 days


#10 posted 06-25-2018 06:05 PM

Yo Fridge,
Wire wheels have their place. PBR is awesome!

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

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DBDesigns

220 posts in 416 days


#11 posted 06-25-2018 06:12 PM

TheFridge,
See y’all in Death Valley this fall for the way too infrequent Dawgs vs. Tigers extravaganza. Last time we played y’all in Athens I gained about 5 lbs just form the LSU fans sharing their tailgate fair. What a party!

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View Rich's profile

Rich

4555 posts in 1008 days


#12 posted 06-25-2018 06:22 PM


Yo Fridge,
Wire wheels have their place. PBR is awesome!

- DBDesigns

Having taken an entire semester of Material Science in engineering school, I’m finding your wire wheel argument questionable. Do you have anything to support the statement that the natural grain of the “iron” will be removed, and that that will lead to it rusting faster?

My lab work in class indicated that the only thing that will change the grain structure of steel is heat.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View DBDesigns's profile

DBDesigns

220 posts in 416 days


#13 posted 06-25-2018 06:42 PM

Here’s what I’m talking about. No mechanical method will alter the molecular structure of the iron without heat. You are right about that. When the planes were sold new, they had “Grain Marks” that are in a parallel direction with the sole. If the plane body is sanded along a flat surface with sand paper taped there, like a jonter top or a tablesaw, you will get a beautiful reproduction of how it came from the original maker. The finer the grit the better. A wire wheel allows it to rust more because the microscopic dents the wheel puts in the surface add more unprotected surface area. Also, the sole of the plane depends on it’s flatness to perform properly and a wire wheel does not contribute to a flat surface.

BTW, I hated my materials science class. All that crystalline structure mumbo jumbo just gave me a headache.

-- I remember when Grateful wasn't Dead

View ElroyD's profile

ElroyD

134 posts in 1007 days


#14 posted 06-25-2018 06:43 PM

I’d restore them just for the practice of restoring them. If you find afterwards that they are worth selling, you could always do so.

-- Elroy

View Don W's profile

Don W

19248 posts in 2986 days


#15 posted 06-27-2018 11:46 PM

Are they in your shop yet?

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

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