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Forum topic by Lemmiwinks posted 06-15-2018 09:38 AM 591 views 0 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Lemmiwinks

4 posts in 403 days


06-15-2018 09:38 AM

Image for reference: https://imgur.com/a/aP9apLf

Hello, i need some help figuring out if i can do this. I’m sort of messing with my cabinets in my kitchen and want to know if its possible to sort of plane off about a 1/4” off this panel so that its even and not raised. I basically want to have a flat cabinet instead of the raised bits. Is this possible to do myself? Is it possible to take this somewhere and have it done?

I had thought of just flipping the panels around because the inside part is flat, but then they cabinet doors look odd when opened. Im currently stripping the stain off the cabinets and re-staining.

Any help is appreciated cheers.


9 replies so far

View jmos's profile

jmos

916 posts in 2792 days


#1 posted 06-15-2018 12:00 PM

It looks like you can get the panel out of the door (how did you do that?). If so, you should be able to plane them down so that the raised portion is flat. It would be most easily done if you have access to a thickness planer that is wide enough to plane the panel. I’m sure you could take them someplace to have it done as well; most cabinet shops would be able to do it if they are not too wide (over ~20” or so).

If you don’t have a planer that wide, you could use hand planes, a belt sander, an handheld electric planer, or a router and sled to take them down, but all would be a lot more work.

In many cases, if you were building a flat panel door from scratch, you would actually make a raised panel and put the raised portion on the inside (same as flipping the panel, as you discussed.) This makes the panel thicker and stronger. I’d be cautious as to how much thickness you have left after you plane them flush; if the panels are only 1/4” thick, they may be too thin to work well. From the picture, it looks fairly thick, but it’s hard to tell.

-- John

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PPK

1441 posts in 1232 days


#2 posted 06-15-2018 01:51 PM

I agree with jmos. It looks like its a solid wood panel, so you can plane it. Is the panel truly out of the door though? If it is out of the door, it may be easier to just put in a new flat panel!

-- Pete

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Lemmiwinks

4 posts in 403 days


#3 posted 06-15-2018 04:11 PM

yes, the panel is out of the door frame, its held in there by little clips. The wood is solid Red Oak and its about 3/4” thick including the raised bit i want to take off. All in all i have about 30 panels, the smallest width 6” biggest width 14”. Is this something a cabinet shop would do on the cheap side, or am i better off building a router surfacing jig and routing them down myself? I thought about getting new panels but it looked to expensive, and i didn’t want to throw out good wood.

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Rich

4579 posts in 1012 days


#4 posted 06-15-2018 04:26 PM

Another +1 for jmos (John). Look at Shaker paneled doors and you’ll often see a flat front and raised in the back. It might look odd to you at first, but it’s pretty traditional and, like John said, adds to their soundness.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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Lemmiwinks

4 posts in 403 days


#5 posted 06-15-2018 05:14 PM

Alright, here is what the door looks like originally, don’t mind the color, I’m in the processes of stripping. https://imgur.com/NJCsYLo

Here is what i want it to look like https://imgur.com/qPMkVQ5 (if i could change the trim cheaply i would, id rather have a flat piece of trim rather than the curvy design.)

And finally what the door looks like with the panel flipped so the raised bit is on the inside. https://imgur.com/hWjCLEY

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Rich

4579 posts in 1012 days


#6 posted 06-15-2018 05:45 PM

Got it. Those panels are set in deep. That’s not what I was picturing, although I should have figured it out when you said they were held in by clips. Forget my last post; it was way off.

Since you’re stripping and refinishing, if it were me, I’d go buy some sheets of 1/4” oak veneer plywood. It won’t break the bank and will give you that look you’re seeking.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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jmos

916 posts in 2792 days


#7 posted 06-15-2018 09:26 PM

I’ve never seen a panel held in a door that way (not that it means all that much.) Almost makes me wonder if there was glass in there at some point.

Anyway, I think Rich’s idea is good, use a decent oak veneer plywood (looks like red oak to me.). If the recess allows I’d go thicker than 1/4” if they are lower cabinet door, in case someone leans against them hard, but I’m usually overly cautious.

-- John

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Lemmiwinks

4 posts in 403 days


#8 posted 06-15-2018 11:24 PM

Thanks for all the ideas i really appreciate it. My friend has a router (i think its a 2 1/2 HP variable speed one) going the cheapest route, can i plane off 1/4” in one pass using a jig or would i have to take it slow and do 2-3 passes?

I got a lot of time and don’t mind the labor side of it. I’d hate to through out solid wood for plywood veneer. Without the raised portion of the panel the board will still be a hair under 1/2”.

Lastly, just out of curiosity what do you think someone would charge (like a cabinet maker) to plane 30 panels, none longer than 23” and wider than 14”? under 200$?

Thanks again for your time and knowledge.

View AxkMan's profile

AxkMan

65 posts in 549 days


#9 posted 06-16-2018 01:00 AM

You can plane it flat, either hand plane or electrical. You can even try a band saw if you are good with those. Then you finally sand the whole surface down smooth to get a flat surface.

What you are trying to duplicate in the 2nd picture is not one solid piece like your 1st one. It is two layers of trim, around and on top, of the center piece. To get something like that a router might help a lot. Otherwise you completely duplicate the 2nd.

After the planing, cut out the edges to the raised trim width you want. You won’t be able to get miter joints, but you can use biscuits or just plane glue the edges together. Next you route a small dado on the two to push the center panel down as much as you want. Just adjust the depth of the router bit.

Just keep your dimensions in mind. In all if you choose that route your overall panel will shrink about 1/4” top and side in total.

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