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Well... That's not walnut

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Forum topic by TheGreatJon posted 06-15-2018 03:29 AM 960 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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TheGreatJon

348 posts in 1650 days


06-15-2018 03:29 AM

I picked up a few logs that were on the side of a hiking trail. Judging by the piles of sawdust next to them, they had pretty recently been cut by the forest service. The grain had a deep brown color that was obviously walnut.

Then I went to mill it and my chainsaw was spitting out vibrant yellow chips. Anyone know what this is? Photo doesn’t do the color justice. It is Crayola yellow. Osage? Does Osage turn brown in the sun?

-- This is not the signature line you are looking for.


13 replies so far

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2321 posts in 2214 days


#1 posted 06-15-2018 05:04 AM

Yes it does.

-- Aj

View ddockstader's profile

ddockstader

165 posts in 3678 days


#2 posted 06-15-2018 01:11 PM

Could also be mulberry. Mulberry, when split, is a vibrant yellow. It turns brown with age and sun exposure.

View lew's profile

lew

12801 posts in 4172 days


#3 posted 06-15-2018 01:47 PM

Maybe Butternut

-- Lew- Time traveler. Purveyor of the Universe's finest custom rolling pins.

View Jeremymcon's profile

Jeremymcon

352 posts in 1096 days


#4 posted 06-15-2018 02:03 PM

Could be mulberry. You’d probably know if it was Osage, because it’d be really really hard to split. Mulberry is bright yellow, and turns dark orange/brown in sunlight. Also Osage has a yellow pigment that will actually dissolve in water if you leave some chips in the water. The heartwood of both mulberry and Osage are very resistant to rot. Mulberry is pretty light weight when dried, where Osage is more dense.

Though looking at it, I’m not sure it looks like mulberry… The mulberry I used had very white sap wood, the heartwood was bright yellow.

View joey502's profile

joey502

546 posts in 1934 days


#5 posted 06-15-2018 02:33 PM

I think it is mulberry.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9918 posts in 1555 days


#6 posted 06-15-2018 08:47 PM

Got any with bark still on? I recently had some Mulberry that turned out to be Hackberry :-)

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1452 posts in 1640 days


#7 posted 06-15-2018 11:57 PM

Any pics of the bark? It does look like mulberry to me though.

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AZWoody

1452 posts in 1640 days


#8 posted 06-15-2018 11:59 PM

Any pics of the bark? It does look like mulberry to me though.

View TheGreatJon's profile

TheGreatJon

348 posts in 1650 days


#9 posted 06-16-2018 12:16 AM

The longer piece in front is cherry. The short pieces that it is leaning on are from this group of mystery wood.

-- This is not the signature line you are looking for.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9918 posts in 1555 days


#10 posted 06-16-2018 02:12 AM

Bark could be either Mulberry or Walnut but not Osage Orange I don’t think. Between the bark and the color of the split wood, I’m going with Mulberry.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3517 posts in 1804 days


#11 posted 06-16-2018 03:13 AM

Bark looks like mulberry to me but the best way to tell is look at the end grain with a magnifying glass and compare it to the mulberry and osage orange pictures on wood-database.com. You may need to use a sharp pocket knife or chisel to get a smooth clean cut to get a good look at the end grain.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

9918 posts in 1555 days


#12 posted 06-16-2018 09:53 AM

Oh, and be careful when you mill that Cherry. There’s a drawknife sticking out of it! ;-))

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View WDHLT15's profile

WDHLT15

1816 posts in 2892 days


#13 posted 06-17-2018 12:28 PM

The pores in osage are occluded with tyloses. Basically plugged. The pores in mulberry are open, not plugged. Look at a clean slice (use a razor knife to make a clean slice on the end grain) of the end grain to examine the pores.

Does look like mulberry to me, too.

-- Danny Located in Perry, GA. Forester. Wood-Mizer LT40HD35 Sawmill. Nyle L53 Dehumidification Kiln. hamsleyhardwood.com

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