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Forum topic by kyngfish posted 06-11-2018 02:00 PM 312 views 0 times favorited 2 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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kyngfish

35 posts in 512 days


06-11-2018 02:00 PM

Hi all, I did my first project painting with a HVLP conversion spray gun this weekend. After reading around, and considering my budget and existing tools, I bought the Husky HVLP and everything turned out fairly well, a bit of a learning curve.

All in all, I was painting a few chairs for my wife, and the finish to my eye, looks pretty good. Considering the chairs are wood, I didn’t expect a perfectly smooth finish, though I did lay down 2 coats of primer and smoothed out some areas. Any major flaws were 100% user error. My wife loves the finish, though I can see 100 tiny errors I made and I know what would make it better next time.

I had a few questions:

- I have a Porter Cable C5101 21 Gal that has 150 max PSI, 5.3 CFM 90 and 7.1 CFM 40. It has a regulator built in, so I didn’t get the regulator at the gun, but I noticed that when I set it at the 40 PSI, PSI would drop to 20 while I was pressing the trigger. I set the gun up to 60 PSI and it would drop to 40 during spray, this seemed to work, but checking if this is normal or if the regulator at the gun would help this? Do I just need to leave it at 40, despite the drop?

- After a few projects, I’m considering upgrading to the Devilbiss guns, I’m considering the FLG 670 – but the CFM they are requiring is around 10 @ 35 PSI. I want to get the Devilbiss to be able to do some body panels on a car, is upgrading my compressor a must? Are there other guns at that 200ish price point I should consider?


2 replies so far

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splintergroup

2730 posts in 1645 days


#1 posted 06-11-2018 05:50 PM

The pressure at the gun will drop when you press the trigger, just basic physics of the plumbing. You want your regulator to show the correct pressure while the trigger is pressed and air is flowing. Best option is one of the small regulators that attach at the gun. This way you can keep a higher pressure in the air line.

Some of the Devilbiss models come with a standard air cap and a “HVLP” style cap. I recently attained a Devilbiss SRI spot gun for spraying lacquers and it works wonderfully. In a pinch it could do fender sized objects.

I did a lot of car painting with a full sized gun and a 20 gallon/2HP compressor (don’t recall the airflow specs). It worked but was marginal and I often had to wait for it to catch up.

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kyngfish

35 posts in 512 days


#2 posted 06-11-2018 06:43 PM


I did a lot of car painting with a full sized gun and a 20 gallon/2HP compressor (don t recall the airflow specs). It worked but was marginal and I often had to wait for it to catch up.

- splintergroup

Thanks for the feedback! If I want to do an entire car I think I’d move up on the compressor, what I’m looking for is something that can lay down a nice finish on things like… mirrors, or lower valances, things that get a lot of wear and tear, while at the same time, finish up small pieces of furniture if it can.

I guess it wouldn’t be smart to buy the Devilbiss knowing my compressor only puts out 7.1 CFM at 40 when it wants 10 at 35. I want to invest in a gun right now, not a new compressor, so if I could find a gun to do that, and still work with what I have, great, but if the reality is that even if I wanted to do small parts with a good finish I need to upgrade, that’s fine.

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