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saran wrap to prevent drying

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Forum topic by Karda posted 06-07-2018 05:36 PM 1202 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Karda

1586 posts in 976 days


06-07-2018 05:36 PM

Hi, I started putting saran wrap on my rough turned bowels to prevent drying, but is will saran do that. I figured if it prevents food from spoiling it mus prevent air passage it must be ok. Am I wrong here thanks Mike


20 replies so far

View JADobson's profile

JADobson

1443 posts in 2533 days


#1 posted 06-07-2018 06:48 PM

Don’t you want them to dry? Isn’t that the point of rough turning them? I’ve only done a couple but found that putting them in a paper bag with the shavings worked just fine.

-- No craft is very far from the line beyond which is magic. -- Lord Dunsany — Instagram @grailwoodworks

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jerkylips

495 posts in 2993 days


#2 posted 06-07-2018 07:12 PM

OK, if no one else is going to say it then I am.

Rough turned bowels? Sounds like you need to see a doctor..!

View BobAnderton's profile

BobAnderton

294 posts in 3213 days


#3 posted 06-07-2018 07:33 PM

I think saran wrap will hold too much moisture on the surface and pose a risk of mildew and mold staining. I’ve heard of people using plastic garbage bags to put rough turned bowls in and they had to end up tossing the entire moldy mess. But, you know, maybe there is a technique to it and how/where you put the saran wrap that will make it work.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

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Rayne

1209 posts in 1962 days


#4 posted 06-07-2018 07:41 PM

I recently saw the Wood Whisperer do this and he didn’t have any issues so far. It wasn’t a rough cut bowl, but it was fresh cut parts that had to be put aside for a little while to prevent drying out and warping the parts.

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Rayne

1209 posts in 1962 days


#5 posted 06-07-2018 07:42 PM



OK, if no one else is going to say it then I am.

Rough turned bowels? Sounds like you need to see a doctor..!

- jerkylips

I can’t imagine what that smelled like walking within the vicinity of this incident, nor do I want to know. lol.

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Karda

1586 posts in 976 days


#6 posted 06-07-2018 07:47 PM

you noticed, I did that to see how long before somebody said something or it could be old mans disease ot r alttle bit of both. any way yes I want them to dry that is why I only wrap end grain as you would with wax or glue.The only time I use a plastic bag is when I leave a piece on the lathe overnight’. I dothis when I cut the round blank and with rough turned bowls as well. Thanks Mike

View OSU55's profile

OSU55

2363 posts in 2412 days


#7 posted 06-07-2018 08:00 PM

Never tried it but I think the idea is to wrap the outside and leave the foot and a hole, probably the size of the foot, over the top of the bowl, open to allow some moisture escape. I started with the heavy grocery bag/ kraft paper with chips thrown in method and it worked so well I didnt bother trying other methods. I have lost a couple (out of 100 or so) that warped, twisted, and cracked so bad I couldnt save them, but it was due to the way I cut the blank.

Whatever method you choose, use weight change to determine when its dry enough to finish turn. Package it however, weigh the whole pkg, write it down (I use painters tape to close the bag or wrapping paper and write on it), then check the wt whenever you want and record the #. When the wt stops changing over a week or so, its good to go. The drying time can vary from 2-3 weeks to 3-4 months depending on how thick and wet to begin with, where stored, and weather. I store mine in the house on wire shelves so that temp and humidity is much more constant. The wt method takes the guessing out of the process. An electronic kitchen scale rated to 10 lbs or so is cheap and works very well.

View Abter's profile

Abter

75 posts in 1050 days


#8 posted 06-07-2018 08:51 PM

I have no insight into using saran, but I have wondered why “turning blocks” sold by retailers to the woodturning market are 100% coated in wax. I understand why it helps to put wax, paint-with-wax, or simply leftover exterior paint on the endgrain of green wood to reduce cracks by slow the endgrain from drying faster than the rest of the green wood.. But a full wax (or saran) coating??? I guess full wax or saran would keep the endgrain from drying too fast…by making EVERYTHING dry slowly (if at all). I hope wiser folks here at LJ can help.
Signed
Still confused after all these years

-- "Many men fish all their lives without ever realizing that it is not the fish they are after." {often mis-quoted as by H.D. Thoreau}

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Karda

1586 posts in 976 days


#9 posted 06-07-2018 09:18 PM

Hi, Abter, wood retailers fully wax there wood for storage and shipping, they dry less fully covered. The customer can treat the wood as they please. It is ok to fully coat with wax because wax breaths some, enough to prevent mildew in most cases. Saran or plastic does not breathe and does promote the growth of mildew etc. I was concerned that saran would be inadequate to the job but i answered my own question it will work but only on end grain

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1584 posts in 2152 days


#10 posted 06-07-2018 11:02 PM



Hi, Abter, wood retailers fully wax there wood for storage and shipping, they dry less fully covered. The customer can treat the wood as they please. It is ok to fully coat with wax because wax breaths some, enough to prevent mildew in most cases. Saran or plastic does not breathe and does promote the growth of mildew etc. I was concerned that saran would be inadequate to the job but i answered my own question it will work but only on end grain

- Karda

Wow Mike, I am impressed. You are now at the point of giving advise to others. And then you had that insight in your last sentence I highlighted. I think all the questions you were asking in the last 2 years has finally soaked in. Good for you. Please don’t take that as criticism. You are progressing as you should.

I asked where you lived a couple weeks ago as I was in western Massachusetts and had originally planned on a stop by, but was having vehicle issues, so didn’t even dare to try to make the visit. Next time…......... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7409 posts in 2621 days


#11 posted 06-07-2018 11:12 PM

I asked where you lived a couple weeks ago as I was in western Massachusetts and had originally planned on a stop by, but was having vehicle issues, so didn t even dare to try to make the visit. Next time…......... Jerry (in Tucson)
- Nubsnstubs

Dang Jerry – what did you do, an around the country jaunt from coast to coast?? ;-)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Karda's profile

Karda

1586 posts in 976 days


#12 posted 06-07-2018 11:13 PM

Hi, Jerry its good to hear from, I miss your comments, sometimes i smart a little but it is always what I need to hear. I try to help when I can but many times i don’t like to give advice because I am not that sure of my self. Yes I am making progress, enough to get me in more trouble. like the bowl I rough turned then found it off center. I livde in Elmira Heights New York just north of Elmira Thanks Mike

View LeeMills's profile

LeeMills

672 posts in 1724 days


#13 posted 06-07-2018 11:38 PM

Saran wrap should work but may be more difficult to work with and more expensive. IIRC it was RoboHippy who suggested stretch wrap. A 1000 ft roll 6” wide was about $12 at the office supply. You do not cover the inside just the rim and outside. The theory is the bowl shrinks in and does not crack. Seems to work well for me. A short section over the tenon or recess area and up the sides some protects that area which is difficult to wrap. A normal 10” bowl may take 6-9’ to wrap so it is fairly inexpensive.

-- We cannot solve our problems with the same thinking we used when we created them. Albert Einstein

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

507 posts in 3617 days


#14 posted 06-07-2018 11:38 PM

I suspect sellers coat the whole piece of wood because it is easier to dip the whole thing in a vat of hot wax than it is to paint just the end grain.

View Nubsnstubs's profile

Nubsnstubs

1584 posts in 2152 days


#15 posted 06-08-2018 12:05 AM


I asked where you lived a couple weeks ago as I was in western Massachusetts and had originally planned on a stop by, but was having vehicle issues, so didn t even dare to try to make the visit. Next time…......... Jerry (in Tucson)
- Nubsnstubs

Dang Jerry – what did you do, an around the country jaunt from coast to coast?? ;-)

Cheers,
Brad

- MrUnix

Just about, Brad. Almost 8000 miles. Next week I’m heading to Orange, California to complete my “jaunt from coast to coast’ trek across my country. Won’t do another like this one again as the toll was just too high. One month away from home is too much, especially driving it. I did get a lot of wood, plus a bunch of rock/flint for flintknapping.

I wished we could have met…....... Jerry (in Tucson)

-- Jerry (in Tucson) www.woodturnerstools.com

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