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Should I be worried about a few damaged blade teeth?

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Forum topic by Dustin posted 06-05-2018 07:51 PM 2968 views 0 times favorited 21 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Dustin

705 posts in 1343 days


06-05-2018 07:51 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw

As I was changing from my 10” combo blade to my rip blade the other night, I noticed 3-4 teeth with very slight dings/chips in them. I’ve been using the blade without incident, and I did check where the carbide meets the blade (no apparent damage). My question is: Is it safe to continue using with just a few teeth with minor damage, or am I just asking for trouble?

If necessary, I can upload some pictures later.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."


21 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5242 posts in 4563 days


#1 posted 06-05-2018 07:56 PM

Just me, but I DON’T use a damaged blade under any circumstances.

-- [email protected]

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4251 days


#2 posted 06-05-2018 07:56 PM

I do it. They seem to get chipped here and there
just cutting wood.

I suppose a blade could throw a chip. I use a guard
and don’t recall ever finding one.

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8352 posts in 3978 days


#3 posted 06-06-2018 02:03 AM

If it’s a decent blade, have it sharpened. If its a cheap blade, replace it with a better one.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

6034 posts in 3012 days


#4 posted 06-06-2018 02:12 AM



If it s a decent blade, have it sharpened. If its a cheap blade, replace it with a better one.

- knotscott

+1 because Father Murphy tends to show up and a trip to the ER is alot more than a new blade.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View bigblockyeti's profile

bigblockyeti

6180 posts in 2323 days


#5 posted 06-06-2018 02:17 AM

Do you have pictures of the damage? Some blades should be replaced or repaired (if worth it) and some damage isn’t something you might need to worry about.

-- "Lack of effort will result in failure with amazing predictability" - Me

View BurlyBob's profile

BurlyBob

6895 posts in 2868 days


#6 posted 06-06-2018 04:48 AM

+2 for what knotscott said as well as wood butcher.

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

705 posts in 1343 days


#7 posted 06-06-2018 11:44 AM

Well, I said I’d take pictures, then totally forgot :p

The damage to the teeth being where it is (there are two teeth chipped on the side of the carbide, and 2 with significant dings on the top of the teeth), I think it’s likely necessary for those teeth to be replaced rather than sharpened. The blade is the Freud P410t, and has served me pretty well, so I’m looking at 2 options:

Contact a sharpening service and get an estimate to have it sharpened and the damaged teeth replaced (depending upon the cost, I’ll either get it repaired or buy a replacement), or

Buy a true cross-cut blade rather than another combination blade. As it is, I do take the time to swap out blades for ripping operations, so I’m interested to hear feedback on this one.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View enazle's profile

enazle

66 posts in 611 days


#8 posted 06-06-2018 01:19 PM

Man, that’s a name brand blade. Do you remember hitting anything? If no it may be defective.

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

705 posts in 1343 days


#9 posted 06-06-2018 02:14 PM



Man, that s a name brand blade. Do you remember hitting anything? If no it may be defective.

- enazle

Oh yeah. I mean, I’ve had it for almost two years, but I distinctly remember when I turned it on and a nearby drill bit fell off my fence (we just had a thread about keeping stuff off your fence, but I learned my lesson the hard way) and hit the blade.

By the by, I did find a number of sharpening services online, and it looks to run me around half the cost of the blade or less to get the teeth repaired/replaced and the blade sharpened, so I think that’s my plan. Any sharpening services you all recommend highly? Or at least, any that I should particularly avoid?

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6800 posts in 1315 days


#10 posted 06-06-2018 03:04 PM

I take mine to an Amish guy who does an incredible job sharpening them to better then new :<))
should be some in KY :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

705 posts in 1343 days


#11 posted 06-06-2018 03:17 PM


I take mine to an Amish guy who does an incredible job sharpening them to better then new :<))
should be some in KY :<))

- GR8HUNTER

Lol. Yeah, there are plenty. I’m on the outskirts of a major metropolitan area, with a very rural area/farmland only about 10 miles Northeast of me. I see ‘em around all the time. Maybe I should just carry my tools with me everywhere, so I can request an impromptu sharpening? :p

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View Rich's profile

Rich

5133 posts in 1192 days


#12 posted 06-06-2018 03:50 PM

Forrest sharpens blades other than their own. The exceptions are on their web site. I’m sure there are other outstanding companies doing sharpening, but they would be a sure thing.

-- Half of what we read or hear about finishing is right. We just don’t know which half! — Bob Flexner

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

11984 posts in 1741 days


#13 posted 06-06-2018 03:56 PM



Buy a true cross-cut blade rather than another combination blade. As it is, I do take the time to swap out blades for ripping operations, so I m interested to hear feedback on this one.

- Dustin

If you’re swapping blades when you switch between cross-cutting and ripping, I don’t see any reason to stick with a combination blade. I get much better results with dedicated X-cut and rip blades.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

705 posts in 1343 days


#14 posted 06-06-2018 04:13 PM

Buy a true cross-cut blade rather than another combination blade. As it is, I do take the time to swap out blades for ripping operations, so I m interested to hear feedback on this one.

- Dustin

If you re swapping blades when you switch between cross-cutting and ripping, I don t see any reason to stick with a combination blade. I get much better results with dedicated X-cut and rip blades.

- HokieKen

Kenny,

That was my thought, but wanted some input. I know the difference in ripping from the combo blade to rip blade is night and day. Would you say it’s a fairly dramatic improvement in cross cutting? I do already use a sled for these operations to avoid bottom/back tearout.

Either way, I’ll likely have this blade serviced as it’s too good to let go (plus, nice to have a backup).

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View HokieKen's profile

HokieKen

11984 posts in 1741 days


#15 posted 06-06-2018 04:18 PM


Buy a true cross-cut blade rather than another combination blade. As it is, I do take the time to swap out blades for ripping operations, so I m interested to hear feedback on this one.

- Dustin

If you re swapping blades when you switch between cross-cutting and ripping, I don t see any reason to stick with a combination blade. I get much better results with dedicated X-cut and rip blades.

- HokieKen

Kenny,

That was my inclination, but wanted some input. I know the difference in ripping from the combo blade to rip blade is night and day. Would you say it s a fairly dramatic improvement in cross cutting? I do already use a sled for these operations to avoid bottom/back tearout.

- Dustin

In my opinion, yes, the cut quality is much improved. But, my combo blade is a 50T Diablo blade and my X cut is a 60T Freud Industrial thin kerf. So I went up in tooth count and blade quality so it’s not exactly apples-to-apples comparison.

-- Kenny, SW VA, Go Hokies!!!

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