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a router pantograph /copier question

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Forum topic by ShuheiFujikura posted 06-05-2018 10:05 AM 561 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ShuheiFujikura

22 posts in 1489 days


06-05-2018 10:05 AM

Topic tags/keywords: question carving tool carving router resource tip pantograph copier

I picked up this engraver, made in 1972. The motor is running but those belts are missing.
I have to get V-belts for this.

If I want this machine to work as a copier, where should I put a stylus arm?


-- Shuhei Fujikura, Japan, http://www.shuheifujikura.com/


6 replies so far

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John Smith

1884 posts in 583 days


#1 posted 06-05-2018 11:03 AM

from what I remember about the old New Hermes engravers is that
the factory design limits the machines capabilities to only engraving
flat items – and not in the up and down axis.
depending on what you want to duplicate, you would have to change out
the spindle that holds the cutters and LOT of engineering to make it a dimensional
copier. again – depending on the size of items you wanted to duplicate and in what material.
I think the spindle only holds bits up to 1/8”. the HP of the motor is also a factor.
the stylus arm must control the cutting spindle as one unit to move in unison in a fluid motion
sideways and up and down.

the elbow joint circled in red will be your first obstacle.
when you lift the stylus ~ it does not lift the cutter head the same distance.

there are many videos on YouTube about the Marlin Carving Machine that will give you an idea
of how a duplicator router works.
if you have some woodworking skills, I have seen some duplicating routers with an all wood framework
that performed quite well.
good luck !! if you proceed with this project, please post some photos as you go along.

p.s. ~ I really like your Screen Print outfit !! VERY nicely done !!!

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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ShuheiFujikura

22 posts in 1489 days


#2 posted 06-05-2018 11:27 AM

Hi John, Thanks for the comment.
With the up and down axis, it has a dial to adjust though.

For 3-D movement, I guess I have to make a fore-arm to replace.

-- Shuhei Fujikura, Japan, http://www.shuheifujikura.com/

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ShuheiFujikura

22 posts in 1489 days


#3 posted 06-06-2018 01:11 AM

About the belt, does one of those leather belt for a treadle sewing machine work?

-- Shuhei Fujikura, Japan, http://www.shuheifujikura.com/

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John Smith

1884 posts in 583 days


#4 posted 06-06-2018 01:26 AM

yes – that is what I had in mind if you can find one.
joined with a staple type fastener at the ends.
a quick google search turned up some on the net: 6ft @ $7 from Amazon.

somewhere in Japan, there should be some kind of suitable substitute.
motorized garden equipment has narrow V-Belts that “might” work if you can’t find the round one.
good luck !

,

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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MrUnix

7405 posts in 2619 days


#5 posted 06-06-2018 01:36 AM

That sheave appears to be for a standard V-belt… but if the one on the arm needs to be somewhat flexable depending on arm articulation, a proper sized o-ring would probably work and have enough flex.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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ShuheiFujikura

22 posts in 1489 days


#6 posted 06-06-2018 02:51 AM

These are close-up view of the sheaves.

-- Shuhei Fujikura, Japan, http://www.shuheifujikura.com/

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