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Ducting for Super Dust Deputy ---do I need 5" ducting?

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Forum topic by Sark posted 05-27-2018 07:05 PM 4089 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sark

402 posts in 1411 days


05-27-2018 07:05 PM

I bought the 6” model of Super Dust Deputy, only to find out that the input port is really 5” not 6”. The port to the blower is 6”. Boy was I fooled! Should have read the specs, etc… Can’t return it.

Anyway, 5” ducting is not readily available in PVC. And the price quoted for 5” PVC is incredibly high since I guess not much is sold. And for the thin Schedule 20 used for drain pipe, the price is even higher. The highest price I’ve found is $14 per lineal foot!. But none of it is cheap.

I can buy Oneida 5” components in metal, but I much prefer PVC ducting because its ever so much easier to work with. And less expensive (depending). Don’t want to choke the air flow with 4” ducting.

What do you recommend? Use a 5” to 6” adapter and run 6” duct around the shop (my inclination). Any of you using the HVAC ducting available from Home Depot? What have you other SSD users done?


20 replies so far

View BobAnderton's profile

BobAnderton

312 posts in 3841 days


#1 posted 05-27-2018 07:34 PM

I would definitely run 6” duct, even if it restricts down to 5” going into the dust deputy. You are going to lose X inches of static pressure pulling air through your ducting, and you want to minimize how much that is, which means larger ID duct is better, as long as you’re maintaining sufficient airspeed to keep things moving.

You are going to lose a lot of static pressure due to the cyclone, and a lot more pulling through your ductwork. I don’t think the restriction of a 5 inch inlet to the cyclone will be that much of a factor. You’ll pull more air through 6” duct network feeding a 5 inch inlet cyclone than you would with 5” duct network feeding a 5” inlet cyclone. Plus the 6” sewer and drain PVC is cheap and standard.

You can model all the what-if scenarios for your setup options using Bill Pentz's excel static loss calculator , but I think the take-away is run 6” up to the cyclone (and 6” tool ports where possible) to minimize the static loss that occurs upstream of the cyclone.

-- Bob Anderton - Austin, TX - Nova 3000 lathe, Alaskan Mark III mill, Husqavarna Saw

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1699 posts in 3637 days


#2 posted 05-27-2018 07:43 PM

I used a 5” to 4” reducer for the inlet and a 6” hose from the cyclone to the dust collector. Seems to work fine.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

6344 posts in 3864 days


#3 posted 05-27-2018 08:43 PM

Well you didn’t say what your powerplant will be, so I can’t say for sure. If it’s a common 1.5 hp unit with 12 inch impeller, I’d use 5” mains and 4” drops. Use metal, it’s better in every respect. Install it with pop rivots and foil tape.

I special ordered my piping from Home Depot and Penn State. Wherever you get it, go with 26 gauge material or thicker. 26 gauge is working well for me.
Good luck.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View BroncoBrian's profile

BroncoBrian

896 posts in 3009 days


#4 posted 05-27-2018 09:02 PM

...What ^^^ said. ...or, you can use 1/2 inch PVC and poke holes in it. Plays like a flute when you are killing time.

-- A severed foot is the ultimate stocking stuffer.

View htl's profile

htl

5375 posts in 2210 days


#5 posted 05-27-2018 09:18 PM

The manual or their web site on this product doesn’t give any hints as to which way to go?
I’ll bet a search on YouTube would have some how2’s

-- An Index Of My Model making Blogs https://www.lumberjocks.com/htl/blog/130264

View Rayne's profile

Rayne

1319 posts in 2590 days


#6 posted 05-27-2018 09:27 PM



I would definitely run 6” duct, even if it restricts down to 5” going into the dust deputy. You are going to lose X inches of static pressure pulling air through your ducting, and you want to minimize how much that is, which means larger ID duct is better, as long as you re maintaining sufficient airspeed to keep things moving.

You are going to lose a lot of static pressure due to the cyclone, and a lot more pulling through your ductwork. I don t think the restriction of a 5 inch inlet to the cyclone will be that much of a factor. You ll pull more air through 6” duct network feeding a 5 inch inlet cyclone than you would with 5” duct network feeding a 5” inlet cyclone. Plus the 6” sewer and drain PVC is cheap and standard.

You can model all the what-if scenarios for your setup options using Bill Pentz s excel static loss calculator , but I think the take-away is run 6” up to the cyclone (and 6” tool ports where possible) to minimize the static loss that occurs upstream of the cyclone.

- BobAnderton

Oneida said that going up is highly not recommended on the 5” port. Their XL is much larger to handle the 6” port for this reason.

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Rayne

1319 posts in 2590 days


#7 posted 05-27-2018 09:31 PM

Look around your local HVAC supplier, even wholesalers. They tend to carry 5” snaplock 26ga ducts for super cheap. I found one near me and they had every connection except the wye. I’m talking like $6-$7 for 5’ run each, under $5 for reducers, adjustable elbows, etc. I can’t be the only one who has found one that sells to the public. My entire setup in a full 20×20 garage was under $100, except on the wyes, but Amazon sells those for relatively cheap now.

View Sark's profile

Sark

402 posts in 1411 days


#8 posted 05-27-2018 09:36 PM

I have 4 hp system for the blower. Actually 2 Grizzly 2 hp units connected in parallel. Got them cheap, and I’ll post a picture when I get it all up and running.

In my old shop, we used ClearVu cyclone with 5HP motor and 6” ducts. Worked great, except amazingly loud. Pentz recommended using PVC so that’s what we did. PintoDelux, you said that metal is better in every respect, wondering if you would mind sharing why you think so. Right now, I’m looking for a cost effective way of putting it all together. It doesn’t have to be plastic. its just what I’m most familiar with.

View pintodeluxe's profile

pintodeluxe

6344 posts in 3864 days


#9 posted 05-28-2018 12:54 AM

Hey Sark,
Plastic piping generates static. It is true of PVC and flex hose alike. It will discharge an annoying static shock as you use your tools.

Everyone says that metal ductwork is more expensive, but when I priced everything out, metal was actually slightly cheaper. The trick is to get what you can from a big box (special order) or HVAC supplier. Only use Oneida for the specialty fittings.

You are not limited to 4” or 6” when you use metal.

PVC install my be easier, but metal isn’t hard either.

Good luck with your decision.

-- Willie, Washington "If You Choose Not To Decide, You Still Have Made a Choice" - Rush

View Mike_D_S's profile

Mike_D_S

697 posts in 3265 days


#10 posted 05-28-2018 04:33 AM

Rayne’s suggestion is a good one. The local guy I got some ducting from even could get the Wye’s with the correct crimping pattern for suction as well for just a few extra dollars.

Mike

-- No honey, that's not new, I've had that forever......

View JonCrafting's profile

JonCrafting

17 posts in 242 days


#11 posted 03-02-2021 09:45 PM

Sorry for reviving this older thread, but my question is the same as the OP, and so perhaps this is the best place to start.

I too purchased a 5” SDD and am trying to plan out my DC ducting. Per advice mentioned earlier in this thread I have tried looking at my local HVAC supplier for cheap 5” x 5’ snap lock ducting, but so far it has alluded me. Perhaps the pandemic killed the the supply?.

The question as noted in the thread title is do I really need 5”, or can I actually just use 6” main duct work, and reduced it to 5” at the SDD? I am a newbie woodworker and this would be my first fixed ductwork system. I am concerned that using 6” for the main ducting, even though the inlet into the SDD is only 5” would cause the chips to slow down in the 6” duct and not flow through it well or fast enough? I seriously considered the 6” SDD XL, but honestly the separator itself is way too big for my small shop and the added $100 cost didn’t help either.

My blower is a 2hp G0548, and I will likely be exhausting directly outside without a filter.

TIA

-Jon

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2347 posts in 3844 days


#12 posted 03-02-2021 11:31 PM

I have a 2 hp with 26 guage 5” snap lol. You can get the duct from home depot and others, but maybe not in the store. I order the fittings. I am very happy with my system, I would not jump to 6”. Steel is not hard to work with. It is in most heating and cooling systems.

View Foghorn's profile

Foghorn

1143 posts in 437 days


#13 posted 03-02-2021 11:39 PM

5” PVC pipe is available but is expensive due to it’s limited use. These guys sell 5” PVC but it’s not cheap and only seems to come in 5’ lengths. Someone, somewhere must have it in single randoms (10’) and cheaper. https://www.pvcfittingsonline.com/5-schedule-40-pvc-pipe-4004-050ab-5ft.html

-- Darrel

View ibewjon's profile

ibewjon

2347 posts in 3844 days


#14 posted 03-03-2021 01:07 AM

5” schedule 40 electrical conduit is available by the truckload. I have installed thousands of feet of it. Bell ends on every piece. But even standard radius conduit 90’s are very long radius. Great for dust collection, but you would need a larger shop. And still the static. 5” steel snap lok duct is the answer.

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

4325 posts in 2545 days


#15 posted 03-03-2021 01:23 AM

+1 enlarging the duct size will reduce the air velocity, which increases opportunity for dust to stop moving and block duct. Duct should always get smaller as they lead away from blower, not get bigger.

PS – 5 inch ducting is my nemesis.

Best Luck!

-- If it wasn't for bad luck, I wouldn't have no luck at all, - Albert King - Born Under a Bad Sign released 1967

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