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JET JTAS-10-1 Tilting Arbor Saw - Changing blade?

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Forum topic by Marleywoodie posted 05-14-2018 11:38 AM 1653 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Marleywoodie

26 posts in 850 days


05-14-2018 11:38 AM

Hello,

I have a JET JTAS-10-1 Tilting Arbor Saw & need to replace the blade. I bought this machine as part of an asset purchase of small woodworking company. I have a selection of wrenches that I got will all the equipment, but none of them are big enough to fit the nut on the blade. I don’t have the manual, but looking up some similar JET models, it only says to use the “arbor wrench”....No indication on the size of the wrench required. It’s bigger than anything I have @ the moment. Anybody know what size wrench to use? I’m assuming it’s SAE, not metric, but ….

Thanks for any help you can provide.

-- - Not all who wander are lost -


11 replies so far

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Marleywoodie

26 posts in 850 days


#1 posted 05-14-2018 01:21 PM

*Update, turns out I DID actually have the “arbor wrench”, it just didn’t look big enough to me & I hadn’t tried it. Doh! But as long as we are on the subject of this saw, I have a couple of questions…..The reason I’m taking the blade off is I have no idea when the last time it was replaced or sharpened. It’s not a tool I often use, only when I am forced to buy lumber too long to be cut down on my chop saw. My shop is on a the second floor and i didn’t feel like lugging a 500 lb table saw upstairs, LOL. Anyway, I was cutting down some 14’ 2×6 Western Red Cedar, and several of the boards “kicked back” (if that’s the right term) at the end of the cuts. I think part of the problem may have been that they may have been slightly warped/bowed (?) – and/or the blade is not very sharp…. Thoughts or suggestions?

-- - Not all who wander are lost -

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remdds

36 posts in 3045 days


#2 posted 05-14-2018 02:58 PM

Several reasons for kickback. I’m assuming your saw does not have a riving knife since it happened multiple times. As the wood goes through the blade there may be tension in the sawn wood. The kerf is pinching back together and binding at the rear of the blade. Dull blades can be dangerous too. Never hurts to replace or resharpen.

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jonah

2075 posts in 3719 days


#3 posted 05-14-2018 03:11 PM

The fence not being aligned parallel with the blade is almost certainly why you got kickback. Align the fence so that it is parallel with the blade.

I would seriously advise watching some basic table saw safety videos. From your post, it doesn’t seem like you have a lot of experience with the table saw, and it is an incredibly dangerous tool if you don’t know how to use it safely.

You have a razor sharp, exposed blade spinning at ~6000+ rpm right at you, backed by a 3HP motor. It’s trivially easy to put the workpiece in contact with the back of the blade, hurling the piece at you at potentially 100+ MPH. It doesn’t take much imagination to see how that could be dangerous.

Please, please learn to use the tool safely.

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MrRon

5571 posts in 3664 days


#4 posted 05-14-2018 03:23 PM

I have that same model saw and have had it for about 30 years. It is a great saw and should give you many years of good service. Make sure the fence is parallel with the miter gage slot and that the slot is parallel with the blade. It may take a bit to check and realign if necessary. I have the manual if you are interested. Just let me know.

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the_other_ken

38 posts in 3396 days


#5 posted 05-14-2018 03:54 PM

A table saw is not the best tool for cross-cutting a 14’ 2×6. Were you using the mitre gauge to try to hold the wood straight or were you doing it free hand? Either method is an invitation to kick-back.

If you want to continue to cross-cut long boards on a table saw, I would recommend a big sled with some toggle clamps to hold the wood securely. If it pivots slightly, you WILL get kick-back.

If it was me, I would cut them down using a handsaw, skilsaw, or a jig saw, all of which will be much safer. You can then clean up the cut on the chop saw.

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Marleywoodie

26 posts in 850 days


#6 posted 05-14-2018 03:55 PM

MrRon, I found a .pdf of the manual on-line, but thanks for the offer. Remdds, you assume correctly that I don’t have a riving knife. I’ll look into whether I can add one to this saw, it’s certainly a good idea. MrRon, does your’s have one? Also, I assume you are correct about the kerf pinching back, due tp the length of the boards (14’ as I mentioned), I’ve been using a second set of hands to help guide the board and likely we are helping to creating the “pinch” by not exerting the same amount of pressure as the board moves through the blade. Jonah, I first used a table saw nearly 50 years ago, believe me I have a healthy respect for what can happen (plus I am an EMT, so I tend to be cautious). I will admit I don’t use this saw on a regular basis, so your concern is appreciated. Sometimes nuance is hard to gauge in the written word, so I’ll take the high road here and assume you are simply being helpful and not condescending. :-)

-- - Not all who wander are lost -

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Marleywoodie

26 posts in 850 days


#7 posted 05-14-2018 03:59 PM



A table saw is not the best tool for cross-cutting a 14 2×6. Were you using the mitre gauge to try to hold the wood straight or were you doing it free hand? Either method is an invitation to kick-back.

If you want to continue to cross-cut long boards on a table saw, I would recommend a big sled with some toggle clamps to hold the wood securely. If it pivots slightly, you WILL get kick-back.

If it was me, I would cut them down using a handsaw, skilsaw, or a jig saw, all of which will be much safer. You can then clean up the cut on the chop saw.
- theotherken

I had actually considered using my skilsaw, but I wanted to see what you guys thought about this first. That’s maybe my best (and safest) bet, as you say I do clean them up with my chop saw anyway already. Thanks. I was using the mitre gauge, plus a helper, but as you’ll see in my post above, the “help” may have exacerbated this issue!

-- - Not all who wander are lost -

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knotscott

8297 posts in 3796 days


#8 posted 05-14-2018 04:58 PM

Saw Blades – http://lumberjocks.com/knotscott/blog/12395

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

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jonah

2075 posts in 3719 days


#9 posted 05-14-2018 06:30 PM

It’s basically impossible to cut something 14ft long on a tablesaw without a very wide sled of some kind. The miter saw or a circular saw are the best tools for that particular job. Basically, when the work piece is big enough to be awkward to move, bring the tool to the wood, rather than trying to manhandle the wood onto the tool. A circular saw and a $4 speed square will give you a perfectly adequate cut, and you can easily finesse it with a block plane or sandpaper if you have to.

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MrRon

5571 posts in 3664 days


#10 posted 05-14-2018 07:03 PM

Marleywoodie, I do not have a riving knife on my saw. I have never had a problem with the kerf closing up on the blade to cause a kickback. 3 HP is enough to power through a cut even when the kerf closes. It just means the cut will be ragged. My opinion is: when a kerf starts to close, people will tend to let up on the pressure of feeding the wood into the blade. That most certainly will result in a kickback. The only thing that stops a kickback is pressure against the kickback. The pressure you exert feeding the wood, is your anti-kickback feature. The more the pressure, the less the kickback will happen.

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Marleywoodie

26 posts in 850 days


#11 posted 05-14-2018 09:54 PM

It s basically impossible to cut something 14ft long on a tablesaw without a very wide sled of some kind. The miter saw or a circular saw are the best tools for that particular job.
- jonah

I understand what you’re saying, and I was using a pretty small sled in relation to the length of the board. The reason I can’t use my mitre saw it that due to space restrictions in my shop, my table will only take boards up to 12’. It was a compromise I made in setting up the shop. Skilsaw it is.

-- - Not all who wander are lost -

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