LumberJocks

Delta DC 380 Planer, Pinion gear

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Trade & Swap forum

Forum topic by Don_P posted 05-11-2018 12:19 PM 1718 views 4 times favorited 9 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View Don_P's profile

Don_P

6 posts in 434 days


05-11-2018 12:19 PM

Hi Folks, This is my first post here. I posted this on another forum and one of the guys mentioned y’all might be interested. I have an “experienced” 15” DC 380 planer that stripped the feed pinion gear, on all the parts sites you’ll see it as part #124, a spiral keyed gear that goes from the cutterhead outboard end into the feed gearbox to drive the feedworks. The part is obsolete and unavailable. I’ve been talking to a machine shop and the price break begins at a run of 25 pcs. The cost would be $45/ pc, add a bit for shipping and such, call it $50. I can probably spread around 5 of them around in my neighborhood and am trying to see if there is enough interest to have them do a run. If you have one of these machines in otherwise good shape, this is a highly stressed part, it might be worth having one on the shelf. This is the high speed, small diameter, low tooth count gear that takes all the whacks. Anyway if you are interested please let me know and if there are enough of us interested I’ll give them a go ahead.

I think email forwards here but you can also reach me at;
[email protected]


9 replies so far

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1494 posts in 1913 days


#1 posted 05-11-2018 03:43 PM

FYI – I just finished a major rebuild on a DC-380 and know chasing parts can be challenging. I did not need to replace a pinion gear, but will share what I learned to help others:

#1: Delta built the DC-380 model in several countries; USA, Taiwan, Argentina, and most recently in China. While there are subtle variations between each generation, many parts are interchangeable. Need to use Delta model (22-XXX) number, not marketing name (DC-380) to differentiate between generations and mfg locations.

#2: There are many clones of the Delta 15” planers. Appears many clones used parts built by same mfg that Delta used in Taiwan and China for their parts.

Examples:
The Grizzly G0453 is clone of Delta. The Grizzly G1021 planer has moving table, but shares some of same cutter head parts. Grizzly has most parts available for both planers. These may fit old Delta?

Jet sells the JWP15H that is also a Delta clone. Jet has moving table version like Grizzly. Older Powermatic 15” (clone) planers used the same mfg as Jet. Jet and PowerMatic replacement parts are available from respective OEM. Another source is “machacc” on eBay.
https://www.ebay.com/itm/Jet-Powermatic-15-and-20-planer-gear-and-Jet-16-planer/172287802831

If it were me needing a new pinion gear, I would buy some clone parts and hope I find one compatible. Then post the information here to help others?

#3 – Read on one of forums discussing Shellix conversion for 15” planers that there are only 2 different versions of that pinion gear inside Delta and clone 15” planers? Supposedly only difference being dimensions of key that mates to gear to end of shaft. Can not remember where I saw it, but one person posted that Byrd folks have had to deal damaged pinion gear issues as part of conversion process and knew of a source for replacements for both pinion gear types. Suggest you contact Bryd to verify if WWW rumor that these discontinued parts are available is true?

Regardless of what becomes of your post here, I congratulate your efforts to resurrect a discontinued gear part for Delta 15” planers. Offering to invest $1000+ for run of replacement gears to help yourself and others is very kind.

Best Luck.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View Don_P's profile

Don_P

6 posts in 434 days


#2 posted 05-11-2018 09:50 PM

Cap’n, thank you for such an informative and nice post. I have an email off to Byrd, that is genius.

Just heard back from Byrd:

Don,
If you go to ereplacementparts.com and type in the part number 6284848, it will show a picture of the pinion gear. We have sold thousand of SHELIX for the Delta 15” planer and have had one customer say that there gear was machined opposite from the one in the picture on ereplacement parts. If your gear looks like the one in the picture you will be ok but if it is machines opposite of the picture then you will probably have to have a gear made custom.
Hope this helps and if you have any questions just let us know.
Sara

I just ordered one, I’ll update when it gets in.

Needless to say you’re treetop tall in my shop tonight!

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5585 posts in 2912 days


#3 posted 05-12-2018 10:44 AM

Now how cool is that? Glad you may have a solution in hand, looking forward to the update (as a 380 owner).

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Peteybadboy's profile

Peteybadboy

797 posts in 2368 days


#4 posted 05-12-2018 11:20 AM

Good forum, I have a DC 380 as well. I did upgrade to the Byrd as well.

-- Petey

View Don_P's profile

Don_P

6 posts in 434 days


#5 posted 05-21-2018 12:34 AM

Strike one, the part number above doesn’t fit, if someone has a 15” powermatic holler and its yours.

It appears the Jet is reverse spiral and obsolete as well.

I just ordered the Grizzly, will let y’all know…

View Don_P's profile

Don_P

6 posts in 434 days


#6 posted 05-27-2018 10:28 PM

It looks like the Grizzly pinion gear fit. I just did a short test fire and it seems fine. Thanks everyone for your help!
P0453535 GEAR 14T

The Powermatic gear I tried first was a little larger, left hand spiral and 16 tooth. The Grizzly is right hand and 14 tooth. The Powermatic was about $18+ shipping IIRC, the Grizzly was $4.75 + 9.99 shipping, no way I could order something that was half the price of shipping, I felt lucky and ordered two for the same shipping :D. The machining and steel looks less than stellar on all of these including the oem, I’ll holler back if it fails soon.

While I was reassembling I took a couple of pics of the last problem I had with the planer. Notice how loose the right hand feed chain is, there is no tensioner on it where there is one on the rear chain. Those are all replacement sprockets and chains not stretched or worn out. This caused the chain to hop teeth on the original sprockets and tore the teeth up. (the pinion gear I replaced this time lives behind those sprockets in that center gearbox just about behind the tensioner, check your oil in that I was very low.)
[img]timbertoolbox.com/cp/drivechain1.jpg [/img]

I drilled through the chain cover, lower right, in a place that would take up some of the slack and improve the wrap on the sprockets then slid a wooden thread spool over a small bolt and nutted that on. Not a tensioner, just taking up some of the slack. That seems to work, it’s had I guess 10-20mbf through it since that and hasn’t hopped again.
[img]timbertoolbox.com/cp/drivechain2.jpg [/img]

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1494 posts in 1913 days


#7 posted 05-28-2018 03:43 PM

Glad you found a compatible part.

Regarding chain tension:
One typical roller chain failure mechanism is stretching. The stamped metal side plates on links actually stretch under heavy use, and chain might need replaced? It is very hard to see, but can be measured. Rule of thumb in roller chain applications is the if you replace the sprocket due wear/breakage, then you need to replace chain as well. Believe replacement roller chains for DC-380 are still available from Delta?

Also Roller chain is relatively easy to adjust length via removing/adding links. Usually all you need is ‘chain breaker’ tool. Depending on pivot pin size, common <$10 tool used on bicycle chain will work to remove/install pins.
Most roller chain sizes also have available a 1/2 size link called an offset link.

FWIW –
The feed roller drive chain on my DC-380 (22-675) is suspiciously loose similar to your mention, but it works? While investigating the tension peculiarity, did notice that some of the newer clone 15” & 20” models using same gear box design, added a second tension wheel? Your solution appears to be another interesting option.

Thanks for sharing the pinion solution.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View Don_P's profile

Don_P

6 posts in 434 days


#8 posted 05-28-2018 06:55 PM

I actually replaced the sprockets as well as both chains. The original chains were the same length as the new ones so even though the chain had taken almost all the teeth off the sprocket it doesn’t seem to have stretched visibly. I was suprised at how slack the replaced chain was, that was the reason for my improvised roller. This planer usually lives behind my sawmill and sees severe duty rough dimensioning then has travelled to multiple jobsites and run miles of trim and panelling. The reason I bought the top moving planer was to set it up with roller tables front and rear and pass everything from boards up to 6x timbers through it. That worked fairly well but I had to be careful of bow, an upward bowed timber riding the rollers would lift the planer and slam it into the rollers. I now use a planer head on a swingblade mill to joint and dimension timbers which does a better job and spares this little workhorse. All in all I’ve been very happy with this machine

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3052 posts in 2444 days


#9 posted 05-29-2018 04:20 AM

I bought a 13” Rockwell/Invicta (made in Brazil) for a really good price off CL. The chain had broken, and piled up inside the chain cover, breaking the casting into several parts.

No Delta chain was available, and my local hardware store did not have metric chain. So off I went to Grizzly (I live a few miles from the Bellingham facility), and the sales clerk helped me confirm that my chain was metric. The new Grizzly chain fit perfectly after adjustment for length, and the chain cover wasn’t hard to fab out of 1/8” plate steel. But after I was done with that job, I realized why so many parts like that are cast iron: way less labor intensive to simply cast hundreds of identical parts.

That was an excellent planer. I was just about to pull the trigger on a Byrd helical head, when I changed my mind and went another direction, however.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com