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Paint sprayer, for home and project use?

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Forum topic by thepurrsian posted 05-10-2018 02:09 PM 980 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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thepurrsian

6 posts in 442 days


05-10-2018 02:09 PM

Topic tags/keywords: paint sprayer finishing paint house painting project painting

Hello all, I considering buying a paint sprayer to paint my new house, the boss (aka wife) has given me the green light. I don’t necessarily need one so I don’t want to spend a fortune but I don’t like cheap tools either. I also figured I can use it to paint simple wood working projects. I’m a little familiar with HVLP, but I want to know what you may use and if it can be dual purpose or two separate tools altogether. I’m sure there a few similar topics but I figured I’d throw this out there. Thanks in advance.


13 replies so far

View Fresch's profile

Fresch

434 posts in 2339 days


#1 posted 05-10-2018 02:11 PM

Go rent sprayer for house,airless, buy sprayer for wood working.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3536 posts in 1806 days


#2 posted 05-10-2018 02:29 PM

Airless is the way to go for painting your house. I tried using an HVLP to stain my fence and it took about twice as much stain as using an airless one. An HVLP is good for fine finishes but for the house, use what the pros use. Either rent or find a lightly used airless sprayer on Craigslist.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1420 posts in 3180 days


#3 posted 05-10-2018 02:45 PM

As for the HVLP gun for home workshop use, You can’t go wrong with the Harbor Freight HVLP gun (https://www.harborfreight.com/20-fl-oz-hvlp-gravity-feed-air-spray-gun-62300.html) for $15. It is extremely well made and does a beautiful job. For more info, you can find user’s opinions on YouTube. All rate it top notch. I have one and it the best gun I have of my five guns of which is a Binks and a DeVilbiss, both syphon-types

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View TechTeacher04's profile

TechTeacher04

411 posts in 1950 days


#4 posted 05-10-2018 03:13 PM

I have a Graco LTS15. Purchased with with my Boss’s OK for a corner bookshelf she wanted and had to paint it to match the trim. I also used it to paint a 16’ tall 16’ wide peach for the Senior High Musical, James and the Giant peach. It is a one trick pony, but it is good at its job. weigh the options as to how much you will use the airless vs a woodworking hvlp set-up. Buy the one you will use more and rent the other.

Avoid the wagner painters. loud and create alot of overspray

View LesB's profile

LesB

2126 posts in 3862 days


#5 posted 05-10-2018 04:43 PM

First I agree with renting an airless spray sprayer if you only intend to paint one house.

If you decide to buy a spray gun check with the manufacturers about a rebuilt pump. It will save you money. Get the piston type pump (quieter and more durable). Also get a good quality spray gun, the cheap ones don’t work as well and won’t last. I think I paid about $150 for my last one. Don’t bother with the cheap handheld gun/pump combinations for doing the whole house but they would work for most shop project spraying.

You did not say what type of siding you have and that can make a difference. For example, T1-11 will need the grooves brushed by hand immediately after spraying (or even rolling) to get the paint well into the grooves. The very best way for all types of siding is to spray and then have someone immediately follow up with a roller to work the paint evenly into the siding. If you have open soffits you will be very pleased at how easy it is to spray them, just wear a hat and filter mask because there will be a little blow back.

Before renting a sprayer get everything prepped in advance and check with the rental company about reserving a sprayer. The application of the paint goes so fast you don’t want to have to keep stopping to get the next section ready. I work out of a 5 gallon bucket because it goes so fast. By prepping I meaning power washed, scraped and sanded and primed where needed, mask off area you want protected from spray including covering plants and walkways next to the house and have any ladders or scaffolding set up and ready. On wood siding I like to use a sheet rock style pivotal head sander and sand the entire surface to remove any rough spots….usually paint blips from the previous painting. I also prepare 3 or 4 pieces of cardboard about 2×3 feet to use as hand held paint shields as I spray around windows and and other areas I don’t want over sprayed…..you can get a pretty straight spray line this way too. Why 3 or 4 pieces; because they will build up a load of paint on the spray edge and need changing. You can get extensions for the spray gun to reach eves and etc that are just out of reach and avoid a lot of ladder work. When everything is ready it is time to pick up the sprayer and start painting. The average house (minus any hand trim work) can be painted in less than a day that way. Be prepared to use about 20% more paint than if using a roller and brush. Exterior house paints have a lot of grit type solids in them so every 10 gallons or so check your filter screens in the spray gun for clogging….or if you notice a slow down in the paint spray.
Finally, be careful with airless spray guns they can seriously injure by spraying paint right through your skin. A proper paint job will last 10 to 15 years with todays high quality paints.

Using an HVLP sprayer on the house will take a lot more time and some of them will not handle the heavier exterior house paint. You may have to thin the paint which is not good on house paint. Especially those with a lot of thick solids mentioned above. Also using an the airless sprayer described above for the house is not practical for small projects because of the clean up and extra paint needed to just fill the pump and hose.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

1932 posts in 1022 days


#6 posted 05-10-2018 04:45 PM


Go rent sprayer for house,airless, buy sprayer for wood working.

- Fresch


+1 Without a shred of doubt!

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1879 posts in 581 days


#7 posted 05-10-2018 05:07 PM

and here goes yet ANOTHER hot topic post.

I very strongly suggest you re-think this in its entirety.
you have not said anything about your house, size, location, nearby neighbors, plants, etc etc etc.
a paint sprayer in the hands of a novice on a house is asking for trouble.
the least little breeze will have everything covered with paint mist. the painters as well.
you have to mask off everything you don’t want stray paint mist on.
your house must be power washed thoroughly prior to painting with anything.
personally, I use an 18” commercial roller with a 1” nap and long aluminum extending handles.
my team-mate loves to spray – as long as someone else can do all the grunt work
of taping all the windows, doors, etc and cleaning up afterwards for him.

more info on your skill set and maybe a photo or two of your house will help others
with their feedback. and save your money for a good HVLP that you can dedicate to your projects.

for more information on house painting can be found at: http://www.painttalk.com

jus my very experienced Dos Centavos

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View thepurrsian's profile

thepurrsian

6 posts in 442 days


#8 posted 05-10-2018 07:28 PM

Thanks for all the replies. Normally I do a lot more research before I decide to buy a new tool or jump into a project, the next house needs little work and I was hoping to be able to knock out the painting before all the furniture we moved, in my mind spraying would be easier. (I hate painting) I figured spraying would be quick, which I’m sure it is, but as many of have mentioned I am novice when it comes to spraying, alas I will break out the rollers and brushes. I love home renovations and all that but painting can suck it. But I can’t justify paying someone to do it when I’m capable. Thanks for talking me out of wasting money, and possibly creating more work for myself.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1879 posts in 581 days


#9 posted 05-10-2018 08:42 PM

wait – you didn’t say if you are painting the inside or outside of your house ??
in my mind, I was thinking of the outside only. but, people have been known to
spray the interiors of a house in a new construction or quick flippers.
even for the inside, for big rooms, the 18” roller makes the job go rather quickly.
especially in rooms of the same color.
then, just grab any runs with a 3” brush (or 9” roller) and use the 2” cutters to finish up the trim.
good luck !!! have fun ~ work safe.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#10 posted 05-10-2018 08:54 PM

Spraying is quick… prepping the house for it isn’t. I’ve always just used a a roller to avoid the hassle. Get one of those metal mesh things that hangs into a 5 gallon bucket and an extension for the roller. For general smaller project work around the house, I second the recommendation above for the HF purple HVLP gun. Wait for them to go on sale for $9.99.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View nickbatz's profile

nickbatz

245 posts in 499 days


#11 posted 05-14-2018 02:45 AM

Hey a question:

I used 5 or 6 cans of Rustoleum spray on the last desk I made. It works well, but the price adds up.

Would that Harbor Freight thing be as good/save money/not spray all over the place (the cans are pretty well contained – I didn’t have to worry about flying paint when I did it in my back yard).

And if it is worth buying, what kind of paint is equivalent to Rustoleum 2X satin?

TIA

View Planeman40's profile

Planeman40

1420 posts in 3180 days


#12 posted 05-14-2018 01:18 PM

Yes, That Harbor Freight “thing” (spray gun) would work well. You can adjust the size and spray pattern (from round to fan and the size of the fan) as well as the amount of paint to be sprayed. The cost comes in getting a suitable air compressor. I have a large 220 volt air compressor, but for more portable use, I found a great small but good 110V air compressor at a pawn shop. Try finding a good but used portable compressor at a pawn shop. And remember, they bargain for price.

-- Always remember: It is a mathematical certainty that half the people in this country are below average in intelligence!

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#13 posted 05-14-2018 06:16 PM

I used 5 or 6 cans of Rustoleum spray on the last desk I made. It works well, but the price adds up.
- nickbatz

It is a lot more cost effective to spray using the gun rather than rattle cans… as you noticed, the cost for rattle cans add up pretty quickly. For what you painted, you could have got a quart of Rustoleum paint and maybe used half of it. Not sure what kind of prices you have around you, but here, that would be less than the cost of two cans of spray paint. I’ve shot Rustoleum with the purple HVLP gun quite a few times, and it works great for that purpose. Only unusual aspect is that they recommend thinning with acetone rather than the more typical mineral spirits.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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