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How to make a saw blade brake

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Forum topic by BGST posted 05-08-2018 04:35 AM 950 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BGST

28 posts in 1200 days


05-08-2018 04:35 AM

Topic tags/keywords: saw blade brake spins too long rigid ts3650 question

I recently bought the Rigid TS3650 which is such a great saw. It is so quiet and has so many more options than previous models I’ve owned. Everything about the saw has pleased me but for 2 things.

Ever hear the saying about how a chain is only as good as the weakest link. Well my first issue about this terrific saw is about the fence. When I bought the saw the fence’s handle was broken but I was confident I could have it welded if I couldn’t I’d just buy a new part.

The fence’s quality, aside from the handle, seems like a much more expensive one but they designed the handle way too weak. Its made of a plastic that can’t even be welded when it breaks. Even though Rigid learned the handle was weak, instead of creating a solution they actually discontinued the part!

It is quite a complicated design but I tried making it out of maple anyway.

I was successful in making it but it was also too weak because it had to be too thin to fit. Finally, I made a sandwich of 2 pieces of Lexan with the handle between them. I screwed 6 very small holes through all 3 pieces, then wired them together. Boy, was I surprised that it worked.

Now that I have fixed the fence it is all about how the blade seems to spin forever once its shut down. It literally takes about 30 seconds to stop. Very unsafe in my opinion so I would love to find a way to make a brake. I do not want to use a piece of wood to pressure the side of the blade to slow it down.

So, does anyone have an idea on how to make a brake or what to do to stop the blade sooner?

-- Barry, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada


13 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4067 days


#1 posted 05-08-2018 04:40 AM

Worn arbor bearings can cause a blade to
coast a long time.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#2 posted 05-08-2018 04:54 AM

Worn arbor bearings can cause a blade to
coast a long time.
- Loren

Yup… that would be my guess – needs new bearings (arbor and motor). And a loose belt will make it even worse.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3052 posts in 2444 days


#3 posted 05-13-2018 10:38 PM

Keep a scrap block of hardwood handy at the saw. When you switch off, push the block into the teeth and it will slow down very quickly. Don’t jam it in, and don’t push sideways. Basically, you are making a saw cut with the power off.

If you have cast iron wheels, they will coast a lot longer than aluminum. But that saw probably has AL.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View BGST's profile

BGST

28 posts in 1200 days


#4 posted 05-14-2018 10:04 PM

From all the comments it looks like I have worn bearings so does anyone know how to change them out?
Also when that has been answered will anyone know how to end this query so I don’t keep bothering people when something has been solved?
Thank you to all those who have been so helpful. It is truly terrific to have such helpful woodworking buddies out there.

-- Barry, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

View BGST's profile

BGST

28 posts in 1200 days


#5 posted 05-31-2018 08:34 PM

I’ve called motor repair locations and they all seem to tell me what I thought about worn bearings, and that is when they wear they do not run better but make grinding noises and eventually shut down. They don’t run smoother.
I’ve never seen a motor on a saw run so freely and for so long after it is turned off. Also if it had a brake I would want to ensure it did so slowly so that arbor nut wouldn’t loosen.

Does anyone know of a after market break or a reasonably priced motor that will not run for 30 seconds after shut down.

-- Barry, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

View jonah's profile

jonah

2075 posts in 3717 days


#6 posted 05-31-2018 08:45 PM

You don’t need (nor is there any easy or safe way to install) a motor break.

When a bearing loses its lubrication, it actually spins more freely without load on it. That’s the circumstance behind the blade spinning down so slowly.

This is separate and distinct from the symptoms of a bearing that has worn out, which would produce more noise, a grinding metal crunchiness, or something like that.

Replace the arbor bearings with identical replacements first, then try the saw again.

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#7 posted 05-31-2018 09:18 PM

I’ve called motor repair locations and they all seem to tell me what I thought about worn bearings, and that is when they wear they do not run better but make grinding noises and eventually shut down. They don’t run smoother.

There is no one given way for a bearing to fail. It may give you an indication of impending doom, or it may not. Your bearings are giving you an indication of impending doom. You can swap them out now before any damage is done, or you can take your chances and maybe have to pay a lot more after they do. Your choice.

Cheers,
Brad

PS: Bearings are a maintenance item, and are therefore fairly easy to replace – and usually without any special tools.

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View BGST's profile

BGST

28 posts in 1200 days


#8 posted 06-01-2018 09:17 PM

Thank you to all those who have made helpful suggestions. I really appreciate the knowledge. Does anyone know where to find a good clear video of how best to remove and replace motor bearings without bearing pullers?


You don t need (nor is there any easy or safe way to install) a motor break.

When a bearing loses its lubrication, it actually spins more freely without load on it. That s the circumstance behind the blade spinning down so slowly.

This is separate and distinct from the symptoms of a bearing that has worn out, which would produce more noise, a grinding metal crunchiness, or something like that.

Replace the arbor bearings with identical replacements first, then try the saw again.

- jonah


-- Barry, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

View MrUnix's profile

MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#9 posted 06-01-2018 09:21 PM

Does anyone know where to find a good clear video of how best to remove and replace motor bearings without bearing pullers?
- BGST

Would be motor specific, and there are thousands out there… but it’s dirt simple. 4 nuts/bolts and the end bells pop right off. If you don’t have a puller/splitter, then there are plenty of ways to get the bearings off without one. Easiest way is to hold the bearing between the jaws of a bench vice, with the rotor hanging below, then just tap the end of the shaft. Just make sure to catch the rotor as it pops free.

Also, don’t forget about the arbor bearings… it’s easier and more cost effective to replace them all at the same time.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

1932 posts in 1022 days


#10 posted 06-01-2018 11:13 PM


Keep a scrap block of hardwood handy at the saw. When you switch off, push the block into the teeth and it will slow down very quickly. Don t jam it in, and don t push sideways. Basically, you are making a saw cut with the power off.

If you have cast iron wheels, they will coast a lot longer than aluminum. But that saw probably has AL.

- runswithscissors


IMO not a good idea, but then again, what do I know. :-) Reaching for scrap and pushing it into a spinning blade just strikes me as a way of exponentially playing with fire.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View BGST's profile

BGST

28 posts in 1200 days


#11 posted 06-01-2018 11:25 PM

Thanks to everyone for answers on how to stop the saw blade running so long after shutting it off. However I took of the motor and spun the shaft which only turned a few times before stopping. So I checked the arbor on the saw which runs forever with very little effort.

Could it be those bearings and if you think it is how on earth do you fix that? That looks like a very big job!

-- Barry, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

View BGST's profile

BGST

28 posts in 1200 days


#12 posted 06-02-2018 06:36 PM

Thanks, I agree with it not being the best but for now that is all I have thought of a well.

Keep a scrap block of hardwood handy at the saw. When you switch off, push the block into the teeth and it will slow down very quickly. Don t jam it in, and don t push sideways. Basically, you are making a saw cut with the power off.

If you have cast iron wheels, they will coast a lot longer than aluminum. But that saw probably has AL.

- runswithscissors

IMO not a good idea, but then again, what do I know. :-) Reaching for scrap and pushing it into a spinning blade just strikes me as a way of exponentially playing with fire.

- Andybb


-- Barry, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

View Jeff's profile

Jeff

507 posts in 3613 days


#13 posted 06-02-2018 06:52 PM

It’s clear you have worn bearings and it is best to replace them. But what’s dangerous about the blade spinning for that short a time? Pay attention, if the blade’s spinning don’t put something in its way. Shoving something into the blade to slow it down is dangerous in my opinion.

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