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Miter saw blade....Cmt, Freud or something else

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Forum topic by Don Newton posted 05-07-2018 12:42 AM 1347 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Don Newton

716 posts in 4037 days


05-07-2018 12:42 AM

Looking to upgrade the blade on my DeWalt miter saw. Was considering CMT or Freud. Any suggestions?

-- Don, Pittsburgh


10 replies so far

View msinc's profile

msinc

567 posts in 922 days


#1 posted 05-07-2018 06:07 AM

I don’t know of any “bad” blades….they are all good and will make nice clean cuts, especially when new. What I have found is that it is a good idea to keep the old blade for use on the rough stuff and buy a new one for when you really need to be accurate. I know it is a pain to change blades, but it pays off in the long run. I have two “old” used blades that I put on my saw if I am just cutting wood that really don’t matter…e.g. rough cut lumber I want to square one end on before I stack it to dry. I keep a nice blade for clean accurate miters and such when I am trying to be real accurate and want a nice smooth cut. I have found that the DeWalt blades are just about as good as any if you take good care of them. That said, Amana Tool makes one of the best. I will say one more thing…..when I am making a picture frame I cut the final miters with a miter trimmer.

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5585 posts in 2912 days


#2 posted 05-07-2018 10:46 AM

I think the type of blade (tooth count, hook angle, etc) is more important than the exact brand. All that has to be considered along with what kind of work you expect to do with the saw. Mine is for construction use only and I have an aggressive cutting CMT blade on it. But if I was doing picture frames or crown molding, I get something that cut much more smoothly, maybe a negative hook blade.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Andybb's profile

Andybb

1932 posts in 1022 days


#3 posted 05-07-2018 04:43 PM

I keep an 80 tooth on my miter saw. Brand doesn’t seem to matter. Last one was on there for 6 years. Only changed it cuz it seemed like it was time. Put a CMT on that I got from Amazon. I keep the old blade around for when I need an 80 tooth for the table saw. When you think about it they really don’t see that much use as they usually only run for 10-15 seconds at a time.

-- Andy - Seattle USA

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11625 posts in 3847 days


#4 posted 05-07-2018 05:03 PM

I use 60 and an 80 tooth Tenryu Miter Pro. Very satisfied.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View mel52's profile

mel52

865 posts in 683 days


#5 posted 05-07-2018 06:38 PM

On my Dewalt table saw I use the Dewalt ripping ( so far ) blade that came with it. I bought a few Diablo blades in different tooth counts for everything else. Their thin kerf doesn’t seem to take as much power to cut. Just my opinion.

-- MEL, Kansas

View Sludgeguy's profile

Sludgeguy

56 posts in 541 days


#6 posted 05-07-2018 07:04 PM

Forrest are very nice but they are pricey.

View josephf's profile

josephf

216 posts in 2515 days


#7 posted 05-07-2018 07:43 PM

you really need to say how and what your using it for .my forest blade cuts trim with zero chipping ,perfect edge .but will not cut that prefinished flooring for very long .I think frued is over priced for the quality .My experince with frued thin kerf is they do not take much to deflect ,dull faster then others . Tenryu makes great blades, Amana has great blades .And Cmt has plenty to choose from . Are CMT general less in price then Amana and Tenru ??? I do or did have a CMT for trim .resharpened it a few times . Wait had two ,one was better in my nonslider then the other .
So main thing is get the blade that fits what you cutting . I have “cheap” blades also .But that dewalt blade that came with my new saw is seriously lacking in the “Nice cutting ” department .i will use up on some treated wood or used/recycled wood .

View Richard's profile

Richard

11274 posts in 3451 days


#8 posted 05-07-2018 07:46 PM



I think the type of blade (tooth count, hook angle, etc) is more important than the exact brand. All that has to be considered along with what kind of work you expect to do with the saw. Mine is for construction use only and I have an aggressive cutting CMT blade on it. But if I was doing picture frames or crown molding, I get something that cut much more smoothly, maybe a negative hook blade.

- Fred Hargis

I agree with Fred. The “Use” It’s intended for is the most important Aspect.

Rick

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

View knotscott's profile

knotscott

8297 posts in 3794 days


#9 posted 05-07-2018 08:49 PM

CMT Industrial and Freud Industrial are both solid choices. I’d add Infinity, Ridge Carbide, Tenryu, Forrest, and Amana Tool to the list. As mentioned, getting the right blade for the task is as important as the brand….depending on the task – typically 60T to 80T, Hi-ATB or ATB grind for least tearout, a triple chip grind (TCG) for tough brittle materials and longest edge life, or even a combination ATB/R for versatility and good edge life.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View darthford's profile

darthford

612 posts in 2343 days


#10 posted 05-09-2018 01:31 PM

I run a Ridge Carbide 12” RS1000 Ultra Blade, 80 Tooth on my Bosch GCM12SD

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