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Forum topic by Sludgeguy posted 05-05-2018 02:00 AM 1024 views 0 times favorited 27 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Sludgeguy

56 posts in 542 days


05-05-2018 02:00 AM

How long do you guys wait after gluing up a panel before sanding or planing? I understand that the wood swells a tiny bit at the joints due to the moisture in the glue so it’s good to let it dry to prevent depressions in the finished surface. I’ve been waiting a week and it seems to provide good results but I was wondering if I could speed things up.
Thanks


27 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4068 days


#1 posted 05-05-2018 02:11 AM

Well, it does depend to some extent on the type
of glue, humidity and temperature but I’ve found
overnight is adequate.

Mostly the problem people have had with this has
to do with biscuit joints. That’s another reason
not to use them for aligning edge joints, which is
something that Norm Abrams would do I think,
so some folks picked up the habit and had problems
with biscuit-shaped depressions after sanding too
soon.

View sawdustjunkie's profile

sawdustjunkie

405 posts in 2137 days


#2 posted 05-05-2018 02:13 AM

I only wait overnight for a glue up. Then sand or plain to the size I need. Waiting a week is a waste of time for me.

-- Steve: Franklin, WI

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12843 posts in 2800 days


#3 posted 05-05-2018 02:16 AM

Overnight/next day.

Biscuits are no problem for me. I have only ever seen one example of a “biscuit divet” and that was posted a few months ago by jbay, prior to that I thought they were a myth. I suspect it happens when someone puts the biscuit near the surface instead of in the middle where it should be.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Sludgeguy's profile

Sludgeguy

56 posts in 542 days


#4 posted 05-05-2018 02:18 AM

I use 1/4” splines with tite bond. Seems like a couple days in a hot Florida garage should be OK. Thanks for the replies

View johnstoneb's profile

johnstoneb

3115 posts in 2593 days


#5 posted 05-05-2018 02:26 AM

I like to wait overnight before applying any stress to a glue joint. Waiting a week is completely unnecessary

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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mudflap4869

1946 posts in 1879 days


#6 posted 05-05-2018 02:39 AM

4-6 hours if the weather is warm and dry, overnight for any other weather. I RARELY glue when it below 40 degrees.

-- Still trying to master kindling making

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2829 days


#7 posted 05-05-2018 03:36 AM

Overnight, because I have to go to work and have yet to perfect cloning myself to send clone to work and leave me to be in shop all day.

LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4564 posts in 1009 days


#8 posted 05-05-2018 04:55 AM

I think a more critical time is when do you start to clean the squeeze out. Do you sponge it off immediately and risk contaminating the area around it, or do you wait a while and hit it with a chisel plane (my technique), or do you wait and sand it?

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2829 days


#9 posted 05-05-2018 05:01 AM

I use a spoon to remove bulk then chisel out once dry. Problem is I am sometimes messy and that is how I have glued the wrong things together. LOL

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4564 posts in 1009 days


#10 posted 05-05-2018 05:07 AM


I use a spoon to remove bulk then chisel out once dry. Problem is I am sometimes messy and that is how I have glued the wrong things together. LOL

- woodbutcherbynight

A spoon? I think we need to resurrect the “Without Personal Experience” thread.

Seriously though, what’s your spoon technique?

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

5316 posts in 2729 days


#11 posted 05-05-2018 07:33 AM

This should raise some eyebrows but it’s true and I never had a problem. I have run plenty of cabinet door sized glued up panels after 30 minutes clamp time. I don’t work in my shop unless it 70 degrees or more. I have learned not to use to much glue so my squeeze out doesn’t run all over the place. Pull them out of the clamps at 30 minutes, run a chisels down the joints to remove excess glue and take a pass in the planer to bring to finial size.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View JohnDi's profile

JohnDi

72 posts in 1854 days


#12 posted 05-05-2018 09:15 AM

I wait overnight and have never had a problem.

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

2883 posts in 2768 days


#13 posted 05-05-2018 10:53 AM

I use titebond and gorilla glue. I always let them sit over night. Generally I either have other things to work on, or it’s time to quit for the day.

I’ll use a damp rag to clean off the squeeze out on titebond immediately after I get the clamps on tight. I’ve never had problems with the water diluting the glue in the joint since the joint is tight and the water is only on the rag and the surface of the board. If I don’t get it wiped off, then the squeeze out is sanded off when the glue line is sanded smooth and flush. You can tell when titebond is cured as it becomes very hard.

For Gorilla glue (polyurethane) I wait for it to foam out and then scrape off the excess with a piece of scrap. After it dries you can cut it with a knife (inside corners), scrape it, use a chisel, or sand it down. Cured gorilla glue is still a bit spongy due to the entrained air. The top usually gets a crust on it as it cures but it isn’t sticky when it is cured.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1880 posts in 583 days


#14 posted 05-05-2018 06:58 PM

I agree with Rich on waiting for the excess to dry then cut it off.
one note that bears mentioning is epoxy – I always wait double the cure time
for “thickened” epoxy as I have had a few failures when pushing the cure time.
so with this thread, all adhesives should be covered.
as for foaming urethane, if it warrants, I mask off each adjoining surface so the excess does not stick
to the surrounding areas – unless the whole panel is going to be sanded down after.

as for Gorilla Glue (foaming) ~ if you are experiencing a spongy middle after curing, it is not due to the
entrained (entrapped) air – it is from the wood not being wet enough during application.
expanding urethane glue cures with moisture, not air. not enough moisture = uncured adhesive. (IMHO).
[get some scrap wood, wet it good, apply the glue, and you will see the difference]

and ~ what’s with the “spoon” ??

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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cabmaker

1745 posts in 3229 days


#15 posted 05-05-2018 08:28 PM

3-4 hours

showing 1 through 15 of 27 replies

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