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Cutting board maintenance

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Forum topic by becikeja posted 05-04-2018 11:50 AM 682 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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becikeja

1002 posts in 3230 days


05-04-2018 11:50 AM

Several months back, I took a run at making a couple of cutting boards. They came out great and have been used to full potential. Now it’s obvious they need to be refinished. The original finish was mineral oil then finished with a butcher block wax oil mixture. My question is, do I need to sand these to get all the wax oil mixture off, or do I simply add a new coat of the wax oil mixture, or do I go all the way back and soak with mineral oil and repeat the entire process?

-- Don't outsmart your common sense


11 replies so far

View TimInIndiana's profile

TimInIndiana

145 posts in 557 days


#1 posted 05-04-2018 11:52 AM

I just recondition them with the wax/oil paste. Rub it on thick, let it sit for an hour or so, then polish it off.

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EricTwice

248 posts in 950 days


#2 posted 05-04-2018 11:55 AM

clean them well, and add more of your oil and wax mixture

-- nice recovery, They should pay extra for that mistake, Eric E.

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ChefHDAN

1416 posts in 3266 days


#3 posted 05-04-2018 12:43 PM

If you’re going to use them, don’t get too worried with the finish, its something that has to be regularly maintained. Regularly scrub it with soap & water to clean and sanitize rinse well and then wipe dry. Leave it it an area with good circulation to fully air dry, I put mine on the stove top grates so it can air on both sides. When it begins looking dry and the work areas are clearly visible I pour block oil onto it and just use a bare hand to work the oil evenly over the top and leave it to soak for a few hours. End grain boards take much longer to need sanding than long grain boards. My end grain board lives on the kitchen island and gets used daily, I have sanded it out twice in the last 20 years. My long grain butcher block tables though, maybe every 5 years.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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CRAIGCLICK

117 posts in 490 days


#4 posted 05-04-2018 01:55 PM

The best finish for a butcher block is hog fat…at least it is at the Skylight Inn.

That’s not wear…it’s history, my friend!

-- Somewhere between raising hell and amazing grace.

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mel52

856 posts in 681 days


#5 posted 05-04-2018 02:36 PM

I use a 100% refined bee’s wax 50/50 with mineral oil mix that I heat up and pour in little jars for customers. It seems to oil and ( kind of ) seal at the same time. I do pretty much like ChefHDAN does on the rest of it.

-- MEL, Kansas

View becikeja's profile

becikeja

1002 posts in 3230 days


#6 posted 05-04-2018 11:49 PM

Thanks for the input. They are end grain boards, I keep them clean and store on the kitchen counter vertical leaning against the wall. They look a little dry, so I will simply add the wax/oil mix again.

Not sure where the skylight inn is mentioned above, but anyone that uses it to cut bbq is ok by me.

-- Don't outsmart your common sense

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hairy

2875 posts in 3949 days


#7 posted 05-05-2018 12:43 AM

https://www.popularwoodworking.com/techniques/basics/cutting-boards-the-best-finish

There are lots of opinions.

-- My reality check bounced...

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CRAIGCLICK

117 posts in 490 days


#8 posted 05-05-2018 12:59 AM


Not sure where the skylight inn is mentioned above, but anyone that uses it to cut bbq is ok by me.

- becikeja

The Skyloght Inn is in Ayden, NC. Its the home of Eastern NC Barbecue which is a vinegar based whole hog barbecue. It is the original NC BBQ and considered by many to be the original style of pork BBQ.

The other major NC style of BBQ is Lexington style which is pork butts and is a pepper/winegar/ketchup based.

Both are so good you will leave yoir wike and kids on Christmas day for ‘em.

-- Somewhere between raising hell and amazing grace.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12842 posts in 2797 days


#9 posted 05-05-2018 02:27 AM

The wood is dead and oil is just for looks, so it doesn’t really matter how you do it as long as you like the result.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View AlaskaGuy's profile (online now)

AlaskaGuy

5313 posts in 2726 days


#10 posted 05-06-2018 03:28 AM



The wood is dead and oil is just for looks, so it doesn t really matter how you do it as long as you like the result.

- Woodknack

The goal of board oil is to penetrate the wood and saturate the wood fibers, in order to stop any other liquids (blood, bacteria) and moisture from soaking into the board. As well, a well-oiled cutting board will keep the same shape when the wood fibers are saturated, so it will not expand and shrink compared to a board that is left to completely dry, then exposed to water. This shrinking and expanding effect is the main cause of warped cutting boards.

While board oil penetrates the wood, board cream/wax acts as a physical barrier on the surface of the wood that protects against stains and liquids. The wax also aids in sanitation, as it fills and seals in knife scars and microscopic cracks where bacteria would otherwise gather.

Used in conjunction, cutting board oil and cream provide an effective combination of protective outer layer and sealed wood that is sanitary, easier to clean and won’t warp.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View Mojo1's profile

Mojo1

286 posts in 3107 days


#11 posted 05-10-2018 07:09 PM

I love the way the mineral oil makes the boards look.

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