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HSK tooling for our new CNC router

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Forum topic by Mainiac Matt posted 05-01-2018 05:31 PM 898 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Mainiac Matt

9178 posts in 2745 days


05-01-2018 05:31 PM

Thought I’d share what one of the tools for the new router looks like…

>3/4” dia., 3” LOC solid carbide high helix cutter by Onsrud
>ER40 collet
>HSK 63F style tool holder (German made)

This setup cost us ~$300

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam


8 replies so far

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DS

3184 posts in 2836 days


#1 posted 05-02-2018 02:51 PM

HSK is good strong tooling. It seems to be the way things are going.
ISO-30 is, by far, the most popular, but, it seems to be going away bit by bit.

The only downside to HSK, currently, is the cost.
The same setup in ISO-30 might be half the money, but, HSK is far superior.

Congrats on the new machine, btw.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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Mainiac Matt

9178 posts in 2745 days


#2 posted 05-02-2018 03:15 PM

Our new machine is a steel framed MultiCam 5000 with and 85” x 120” table and a 12 position rotary tool changer on the gantry. It’s a freekin’ beast, weighing in at 8,500 lbs.

Our other machine is an aluminum framed CNT Motion Systems 900 series with a 60” x 120” table. This machine uses the ISO 30 tool holders and has two 4 position tool bars on the back of the table. If the tool bars get whacked out of alignment, and then covertly pushed back into “near” alignment by an operator who doesn’t want anyone to know he whacked the machine, the long taper on the “snow cones” will get dinged by the spindle mouth on every tool change and eventually the chrome plating will chafe off.

I asked the MultiCam tech. what the advantage of the HSK tool holder was and he said that they are much more securely held into the taper on the spindle by means of the flange. Where the ISO 30 tools simply have a gripper that pulls the knob on top upward to seat the taper.

Both work for our purposes, but having the carousal on the gantry makes for much faster tool changes and the HSK tooling seems to be quite a bit more robust.

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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Mainiac Matt

9178 posts in 2745 days


#3 posted 05-02-2018 03:34 PM

another consideration is that the HSK tooling uses ER 40 collets, so you can go up to a 1” shank.

The ISO 30 tooling uses ER 32 collets, so your max size is 3/4”

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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DS

3184 posts in 2836 days


#4 posted 05-02-2018 08:15 PM

I know that a 3/4” Bit is a HOG!
A real fast way to fill the dust collector bags.

I can’t even imagine a 1” bit and the damage that could do.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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Tony_S

976 posts in 3499 days


#5 posted 05-03-2018 11:54 PM



I know that a 3/4” Bit is a HOG!
A real fast way to fill the dust collector bags.

I can t even imagine a 1” bit and the damage that could do.

- DS

Or the damage this bad boy could do ;)

5”x3” compression. Probably weighs about 10lbs.
My operator was actually hiding behind a sheet of 1” plywood the first time we ran this head. He thought we were all going to die.
7 years later, and a lot of miles….

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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Mainiac Matt

9178 posts in 2745 days


#6 posted 05-04-2018 01:13 PM

That’s one serious cutter. I didn’t even know they made index-able insert compression bits. looks like a jointer head mounted on a shaft.

When we purchased our first (used) CNC router some 18 years ago, the boss very quickly forgot everything the seller showed him about how to operate it and tasked me with figuring it out. In the process, I broke a few bits and sent them sailing across the shop at high velocity, prompting the shop supervisor to relocated his assembly benches. But that was nothing like the potential destruction of the behemoth your showing.

-- Matt -- I yam what I yam and that's all what I yam

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Tony_S

976 posts in 3499 days


#7 posted 05-04-2018 10:51 PM

It’s honestly not much different than a jointer head on a shaft. Other than the compression aspect, and a higher sheer angle, it’s pretty much the same thing. Italian made if I remember correctly….and it was pretty spendy. Well worth the cost though.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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DS

3184 posts in 2836 days


#8 posted 05-07-2018 01:23 PM

Daaaaaang! That is a serious cutting head.

What is your typical application for this?

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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