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Delta T3 fence install help

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Forum topic by LucasWoods posted 04-29-2018 12:41 AM 437 views 0 times favorited 8 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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LucasWoods

448 posts in 1726 days


04-29-2018 12:41 AM

I have a Grizzly G1023 table saw and got a much needed fence for it. I need some help or suggestions on how to drill new holes and lay them out right.

I am thinking that the new holes will be drilled at the same level as the old ones in the rails. I haven’t ever laid out drill holes before and don’t know the best way to make sure the front and back rails all line up right.

I have a drill press, HSS bits and countersink bits.

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF


8 replies so far

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LucasWoods

448 posts in 1726 days


#1 posted 04-29-2018 02:14 PM

Bump

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

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jonah

2075 posts in 3692 days


#2 posted 04-30-2018 11:15 AM

Clamp the rails securely to the table and extensions, then drill directly through the existing holes in the rails through the cast iron. Cast iron is a lot easier to drill than steel. You’ll want a quality, sharp drill bit suitable for metal drilling. You could use a bit of cutting fluid, but it’s not strictly required.

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Gentile

336 posts in 2212 days


#3 posted 04-30-2018 03:50 PM

Years ago I put a Steel City fence on my Unisaw. Fortunately, I only had to drill one hole and thread it. It went well. Cast iron is easy to drill and tap. I like what Jonah suggested…

-- "I cut it twice and it's still too short"

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LucasWoods

448 posts in 1726 days


#4 posted 05-01-2018 04:38 AM

Do I need to tap it? It seems all the bolts that came with the rails are long enough to pertrude through the top and then be secured with a washer and nut. Same thing with the wings.

And yes that does seem much much easier. I have not drilled through metal much and thought the thinner rails would be easier.

Did you all just use a hand drill and a HSS drill bit?

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

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jonah

2075 posts in 3692 days


#5 posted 05-01-2018 01:51 PM

Provided there is clearance on the back side of the table/wings to get a washer and nut on there, then you won’t need to tap the holes, no.

A corded drill and a quality HSS or cobalt drill bit is the ticket. In a pinch, a cordless drill will work, but they don’t tend to have the speed or torque of corded ones.

Individual cobalt bits aren’t too expensive (figure $5-8 or so) and should last a good long time. If you’re at a store buying a drill bit, it wouldn’t hurt to get a bit of cutting fluid – it’ll make your drill bits stay sharper longer by keeping them cool.

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TheFridge

10858 posts in 1879 days


#6 posted 05-01-2018 02:17 PM

All the the fences I’ve seen had countersunk hardware so the fence didn’t hit it while sliding.

You can bolt it and use nuts.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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dday

172 posts in 1823 days


#7 posted 05-01-2018 04:36 PM

I used a corded drill and HSS bit to drill holes in my rail to add an extension wing to my TS.
Cordless just couldn’t do it.. the corded drill was like butter…

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LucasWoods

448 posts in 1726 days


#8 posted 05-01-2018 05:46 PM

I do have a corded drill that is from the 50’s probably. It is all metal. I will have to plug it in and see if it works.

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

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