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Really uneven shop floor

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Forum topic by BobinSachse posted 04-28-2018 07:01 PM 1060 views 0 times favorited 20 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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BobinSachse

45 posts in 1869 days


04-28-2018 07:01 PM

My shop is a 25’ wide by 30’ deep Metal building with a HORRIIBLY uneven concrete floor.
It was poured in about 6 or 7 stages and there are still 2×4s between sections, gaps from where boards used to be, etc….

There is a 12’ wide garage door 2’ in from the right front corner. I plan on a man door on the left side opening to the 15’ x 30’ covered area outside the shop. Boat and yard equipment reside there now.

I took some basic measurements a while back and got an idea of how “out” this floor really is. I measured as closed to the corners as I could, 2’ down and 2’ to the side from all 4 corners.
Let’s call the right rear corner 0
Left rear corner drops about 2” across the 25’ width.
The right front corner is also about a 2” drop from the right rear corner across 30”.
Here’s where it gets bad.
The left front corner drops about 6-1/2” from the left rear corner…..

Rolling shop tools, table saw, band saw, drill press is quite cumbersome. to say the least.

I’ve thought about removing the concrete completely, but that is Way more heavy work than I want to do and the cost would be quite high. we live in a 100 year flood plain, so the dirt moves a LOT.

Over pouring concrete would make the back of the shop really thin and the front much thicker and movement might cause real problems down the road.

My next idea would be to use treated 2x material to create a grid of shims to lay 3/4” plywood or OSB decking on.

A basic 24” x 24” grid. The runners would be the 30’ length, 24” on center and custom cut to allow for the fall of the floor. Then cut cripples on 24” centers between them and maybe pocket screw them in. These would not be secured to the concrete to allow for ground movement.
3/4” decking, either Plywood or OSB and then sealed with epoxy.

Because it is NOT a wood shop only, I need to accommodate for storage of other stuff.

I could potentially clear the WHOLE shop out and complete it all at once, or do 1/2 and 1/2. that way heavy stuff moves shorter distances…..

Ideas, opinion, advise?

-- Bob Y.


20 replies so far

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bbasiaga

1243 posts in 2414 days


#1 posted 04-28-2018 07:12 PM

I was thinking building a wood floor over the top was going to be the best bet. Same idea you had.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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BFamous

316 posts in 539 days


#2 posted 04-28-2018 08:04 PM

I would think a wood floor would be easiest. Start by using a laser level to mark the desired level all the way around the room and work your way down.

I’d probably recommend staying 16” on center since you are only using 3/4” material. You don’t want the floor to sag in between joists & cripples when you’re wheeling around heavy wood working equipment.

-- Brian Famous :: Charlotte, NC :: http://www.FamousArtisan.com

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johnstoneb

3115 posts in 2591 days


#3 posted 04-28-2018 08:36 PM

we live in a 100 year flood plain, so the dirt moves a LOT.
That statement says everything. The only way to keep floor from moving is remove everything concrete wise and stabilize the dirt by digging it out, bringing in large rock, then smaller rock and finally gravel and sand, then pour a new concrete floor. Any thing less and the new floor will just move like the old.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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BurlyBob

6266 posts in 2684 days


#4 posted 04-29-2018 12:15 AM

What Bruce Said!!!

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mudflap4869

1945 posts in 1878 days


#5 posted 04-29-2018 01:49 AM

+10 on what Bruce said. Do it right or redo it every few years until you do.

-- Still trying to master kindling making

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bilyo

735 posts in 1521 days


#6 posted 04-29-2018 02:16 AM

Are you sure you want to risk a lot of expensive equipment in a 100 year flood plain? It’s possible you could get two 100 year floods back to back next year. I agree that redoing the floor and subgrade is the proper way. But, rather than spending your money on that, I would spend the money on getting it to higher ground or getting it up on piers. Sometimes it doesn’t take much to get it up to a 500 year flood level.

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therealSteveN

3092 posts in 993 days


#7 posted 04-29-2018 02:44 AM

Figure out the space you need for a shop. For the storage, and cartruck/tractor parking figure what you need there. At 25×30 you are pushing the envelope for big in either area.

You don’t want to build a wood floor just inside the overhead door or you will crush it with the lighter floor you are thinking of. For the car park you want it on cement/concrete. If you don’t plan to park anything inside you still need storage for wood, and non woodworking tools, and work space. All of that can go on the concrete.

On the woodworking make it all the way to the back, that way if needed you can section off the shop, and heat or cool it as you wish. For the woodenfloor you have been given the blueprint. Laser level to find dead flat, and shim wood to the point. I think you need to go 2×6, 8, or something more than 2×4. This would be a good place for a hand held planer to quickly plane down the joists. Then floor it with a good T&G 3/4” flooring, and never need to look back. That will wear, and support heavier tools plus your back will thank you every day you are out there.

Can’t afford to do it right, work on the concrete until you save up to do it correctly.

-- Think safe, be safe

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Kelster58

755 posts in 959 days


#8 posted 04-29-2018 09:39 AM

There are ways to lift the concrete slabs. In our area we have contractors that will drill a 2” hole in the slab and pump like a clay mixture under very high pressure to lift the slab and stabilize it. I hear it works very well and is way less than new concrete. Here is a link to one of our our local contractors. Bet there is someone in your area doing this.

http://resources.nefoundationandconcrete.com/concrete-leveling?gclid=Cj0KCQjw2pXXBRD5ARIsAIYoEbc5_Kodg0F90RaTuiaN8xoymOxqm4ciHnSgZrBPLAjUjt8of9Zb648aAmy7EALw_wcB

-- K. Stone “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.” ― Benjamin Franklin

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johnstoneb

3115 posts in 2591 days


#9 posted 04-29-2018 12:22 PM

100 year flood plane is somewhat of a misnomer. It actually should be called is a 1% flood. You actually have a 1% chance every year of a flood of that magnitude.

-- Bruce, Boise, ID

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Snipes

410 posts in 2663 days


#10 posted 04-29-2018 02:44 PM

This is only around 9 yards of concrete, skid loader could have that removed in 3-4 hours. Get a better base and pour concrete again. Around my area they do not want you to fill in with big rock as dirt continues to settle around them and thus your floor settles. You could maybe pull out them 2×4’s and pour over the top of whole works also, but this may mess with your garage doors etc.

-- if it is to be it is up to me

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fuigb

559 posts in 3376 days


#11 posted 04-29-2018 03:13 PM

@ OP

what’s the back story on this building: how did the floor end up so torqued?

-- - Crud. Go tell your mother that I need a Band-aid.

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jonah

2075 posts in 3717 days


#12 posted 04-30-2018 11:20 AM



100 year flood plane is somewhat of a misnomer. It actually should be called is a 1% flood. You actually have a 1% chance every year of a flood of that magnitude.

- johnstoneb


Great point here. Also, those calculations were made years or even decades ago, before scientists fully understood the ongoing (and accelerating) pace of climate change. For example, there are lots of places who have had three or more “100 year floods” in just the past decade.

View BobinSachse's profile

BobinSachse

45 posts in 1869 days


#13 posted 04-30-2018 03:39 PM



Figure out the space you need for a shop. For the storage, and cartruck/tractor parking figure what you need there. At 25×30 you are pushing the envelope for big in either area.

No car or Tractor parking inside the shop. I have other areas for those.

You don t want to build a wood floor just inside the overhead door or you will crush it with the lighter floor you are thinking of. The floor will be appropriately sloped at the garage door.
For the car park you want it on cement/concrete. If you don t plan to park anything inside you still need storage for wood, and non woodworking tools, and work space. All of that can go on the concrete.

Why is this? Nothing I have is as heavy as my tools.

On the woodworking make it all the way to the back, that way if needed you can section off the shop, and heat or cool it as you wish. For the woodenfloor you have been given the blueprint. Laser level to find dead flat, and shim wood to the point. I think you need to go 2×6, 8, or something more than 2×4. This would be a good place for a hand held planer to quickly plane down the joists. Then floor it with a good T&G 3/4” flooring, and never need to look back. That will wear, and support heavier tools plus your back will thank you every day you are out there.

My thought are in line with this for the most part. I had not considered T&G flooring though….

Can t afford to do it right, work on the concrete until you save up to do it correctly.

- therealSteveN


-- Bob Y.

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BobinSachse

45 posts in 1869 days


#14 posted 04-30-2018 03:42 PM



@ OP

what s the back story on this building: how did the floor end up so torqued?

- fuigb

The last guy didn’t know what he was doing…. On this and many other parts of the property. I have spent a fair amount of $$ to make things right….

-- Bob Y.

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BobinSachse

45 posts in 1869 days


#15 posted 04-30-2018 03:48 PM



Are you sure you want to risk a lot of expensive equipment in a 100 year flood plain? It s possible you could get two 100 year floods back to back next year. I agree that redoing the floor and subgrade is the proper way. But, rather than spending your money on that, I would spend the money on getting it to higher ground or getting it up on piers. Sometimes it doesn t take much to get it up to a 500 year flood level.

- bilyo


Actually, my shop is on some of the highest ground on my property. I do not agree with the classification on my property. Even in the last 30 years, it has not flooded enough to get that high. My property used to be part of a much larger parcel that is mostly much lower than my 1 acre that has my house, shop, carport, etc. Short of moving my family completely, I must work with what I have.

-- Bob Y.

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