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How Durable are Crafts Paints (acrylic)?

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Forum topic by bilyo posted 04-26-2018 05:01 PM 1410 views 0 times favorited 7 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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bilyo

780 posts in 1555 days


04-26-2018 05:01 PM

I am re-assembling a old (late 30’s to early 40’s) child’s chair where all the joints failed. The old paint is not in good condition, but it is colorful with some nice stenciling. So, I thought I would just try to preserve the original paint after it is all put back together. However, I am worried that there might be lead in the paint. I’m reading that home lead testing kits are not very reliable and it is not worth spending big bucks for lab testing. So, I’m considering repainting and copying the original colors and stencils.

This is a small chair, so I don’t need lots of paint; particularly for the stencils. I’m wondering how appropriate the use of acrylic craft paint would be for this use. I would probably thin it and spray apply. I have several colors on hand, but have never used it on furniture. Would it need to be clear coated?

Oops! My intent was to put this in the Finishing forum. Moderator. Please move if needed.


7 replies so far

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hairy

2887 posts in 3985 days


#1 posted 04-26-2018 05:39 PM

I’m not sure if this applies, but that won’t stop me.

I always clear coat when I paint with acrylics. I don’t spray paint. I always use rattle cans of lacquer or poly.

Mohawk Dead Flat Lacquer is almost invisible. For gloss I usually use poly.

https://www.amazon.com/Mohawk-Pre-Catalyzed-Clear-Lacquer-Dead/dp/B00IO38GYW

I get this for $8 locally.

-- My reality check bounced...

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bilyo

780 posts in 1555 days


#2 posted 04-26-2018 06:13 PM

Just to be clear (no pun), are you talking about the acrylics in the little bottles at the craft store?
Are you clear coating because the acrylics are not durable without it or for some other reason?

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MrUnix

7448 posts in 2651 days


#3 posted 04-26-2018 06:51 PM

I’ve never used it for furniture, but use it for wooden toys and it is pretty durable. And the only time I clear coat is when I want a gloss finish. YMMV.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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LesB

2152 posts in 3896 days


#4 posted 04-26-2018 07:14 PM

I think the “craft store” paint would do the job of touching up where needed.
Then I agree about the potential for lead in the old paint so it would be a good idea to apply a top coat of poly or lacquer. A spray can would be the easiest.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Rich

4696 posts in 1042 days


#5 posted 04-26-2018 07:16 PM

You have to be careful using solvent based topcoats over paint. It can cause blistering. I agree that top coating is a good idea for appearance and durability, but I’d recommend General Finishes High Performance water based coating.

It will seal off any lead as well as fresh paint, so unless you want to repaint, you shouldn’t have to.

-- My grandfather always said that when one door closes, another one opens. He was a wonderful man, but a lousy cabinet maker

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bilyo

780 posts in 1555 days


#6 posted 04-26-2018 09:31 PM

My first thought was to put a clear coat over the existing paint to encapsulate and preserve it. However, when dealing with children who might chew on it or if it gets banged around with use and the paint flakes off, would that pose a risk? Not being able to answer that question lead me to think about stripping and repainting.

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Rich

4696 posts in 1042 days


#7 posted 04-26-2018 10:55 PM


My first thought was to put a clear coat over the existing paint to encapsulate and preserve it. However, when dealing with children who might chew on it or if it gets banged around with use and the paint flakes off, would that pose a risk? Not being able to answer that question lead me to think about stripping and repainting.

- bilyo

Got it. I wondered about chewing but since you were considering painting over it I thought maybe you had dismissed that possibility. I agree chewing would be a problem regardless of what you put over it.

I have no idea how durable specific paints are. I’m sure it varies from one to another. I do still think that the GF HP topcoat would add durability to whatever you choose.

-- My grandfather always said that when one door closes, another one opens. He was a wonderful man, but a lousy cabinet maker

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