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Odd little hand plane

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Forum topic by jtrz posted 04-26-2018 05:45 AM 827 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jtrz

166 posts in 1594 days


04-26-2018 05:45 AM

I randomly found this plane and even though I was pretty sure it wasn’t going to be anything special I bought it anyways. It needed (still needs) a ton of work to get it working reasonably well so I can try out different restoration techniques without fear of ruining something. I also end up learning something new about these things with each restoration. This is essentially a No. 4 smoother.

You can see the flimsy lateral adjuster and the sharp edges of the tote.

I was a bit surprised to find that the depth adjuster as well as the knob and tote screws are brass.

This thing was really nasty. Covered in rust with a protective layer of grime.

I started cleaning it up and found that the sole was close to flat and aside from the lateral adjuster everything seemed to be pretty solid.

The way the frog mounts onto the bed is different than what I am familiar with and I am pretty sure that the depth adjuster screw is not supposed to stay attached to the knob. If any one has any tips on getting that out I am open to suggestions. I’ve had this thing sitting sitting in WD-40 for a while and it still won’t come off.

The iron unfortunately is in pretty bad shape and doesn’t feel very strong. The rust on the backside is serious. The iron is so thin if I am ever able to remove the rust, there won’t be much of the blade left.

But the iron did have something to offer and that is the trademark.

You probably can’t read it from the photo but I am pretty sure it says “Keystone MFG CO” and underneath that is “Louisville”. I’m born, raised, and located in Louisville so that kind of makes sense, the Belknap Tool Company was from here. It’s the Keystone part that is so odd because they were out of Buffalo and I can’t find any mention that they made planes.

If anyone has any idea how Keystone got to Louisville or has any idea who probably manufactured the plane let me know.

It’s these little historical mysteries that pop up after you clean up an old tool a little that I love. Heck, that’s probably why I bought the plane in the first place.

-- Jeff | Louisville, Ky


6 replies so far

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1243 posts in 2415 days


#1 posted 04-26-2018 12:51 PM

Soak that blade in evaporust and then sharpen with the ruler trick. I bet it will be usable.

Nice find.

Brian

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

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JayT

6226 posts in 2631 days


#2 posted 04-26-2018 01:01 PM

If the iron is original, then it looks to me like a sourced plane, where a hardware distributor went to a manufacturer to have tools made with their logo. Pretty common practice. In this case, it looks like a Stanley Defiance line.

There’s probably a better way, but what I’ve done on frozen depth knobs is to soak and use heat to break up the corrosion and then wrap some thin leather around the frog end of the post and grab it with vise-grips while working to unscrew the knob. That generally keeps the threads from getting too damaged. In a couple cases, I had to clean up the threads with a thread repair file afterwords.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

View Don W's profile

Don W

19251 posts in 2988 days


#3 posted 04-29-2018 11:14 AM

You’ve actually found something somewhat special. That’s a corrugated Defiance. Probably the only collectable Defiance. Not extremely value but worth about triple of a regular defiance.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View jtrz's profile

jtrz

166 posts in 1594 days


#4 posted 04-30-2018 10:06 PM

Thanks for the id help, guys.


If the iron is original, then it looks to me like a sourced plane, where a hardware distributor went to a manufacturer to have tools made with their logo. Pretty common practice. In this case, it looks like a Stanley Defiance line.

There s probably a better way, but what I ve done on frozen depth knobs is to soak and use heat to break up the corrosion and then wrap some thin leather around the frog end of the post and grab it with vise-grips while working to unscrew the knob. That generally keeps the threads from getting too damaged. In a couple cases, I had to clean up the threads with a thread repair file afterwords.

- JayT


I figured it was a sourced plane what I can’t figure out is why it says Louisville. From what I’ve read Keystone was a tool manufacturer out of Buffalo, which makes sense that they might get stanley to make them some planes, and I can’t find any sort of connection between them and Louisville. Just one of those weird little historical mysteries.

And when you say you soak the depth knob what are you soaking it in?


You ve actually found something somewhat special. That s a corrugated Defiance. Probably the only collectable Defiance. Not extremely value but worth about triple of a regular defiance.

- Don W


Don, I was looking through your post on the Defiance line and it is closest to the #1204C (right length and width) but the lateral adjuster is the later thin flimsy version and the lever cap is a bit different. I guess, Stanley would just through together whatever was lying around sometimes.

Aside from the flimsy lateral, everything else feels pretty solid and the sole isn’t too bad and should flatten pretty quick. The Japanning is flaking pretty bad so I’ll probably repaint the bed if I think I can actually turn it into a decent user plane.

We will see what happens.
Thanks guys

-- Jeff | Louisville, Ky

View bandit571's profile

bandit571

23190 posts in 3104 days


#5 posted 04-30-2018 10:35 PM

Lateral is called The Whaletail. About 1962 or so, Stanley started to crimp the tail shut. Not all the way, they left a little space between the two sides.

When you re-install the bolt for the depth adjuster wheel..add a spot of Locktite to the threads. This will keep the bolt from coming back out.

-- A Planer? I'M the planer, this is what I use

View JayT's profile

JayT

6226 posts in 2631 days


#6 posted 05-01-2018 01:07 AM


And when you say you soak the depth knob what are you soaking it in?

I’ve done a couple ways. One is to use penetrating oil over and over, hitting it every day for a week or so. I’ve also just dropped it in some Evaporust and let it soak for a week or more. Anything that penetrates the rust to start to free it up.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

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