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Issues with paint bleed

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Forum topic by jonlan posted 04-13-2018 01:24 PM 410 views 0 times favorited 6 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jonlan

61 posts in 1310 days


04-13-2018 01:24 PM

Hi All – I recently bought a CNC machine and have been enjoying putzing around with it. I recently had the idea to make a small game board so I was trying to do some cutouts, paint over, and then plane down to only have paint in the cutouts. However – Im running into this issue with paint bleed. See the pictures below. One of them was done on Maple and the other Oak. I know Oak is very open grained, but in both of these cases, after cutting the board, I applied a heavy coat of spray poly and let it dry 24 hours. My thought there was that it would seal the board and prevent the paint from bleeding where I didnt want it to. Doesnt seem to be working. I also included a pic of the poly and paint Im using. My only thought is that maybe these two coatings are interacting with each other. Not sure. In both cases I’ve taken off quite a bit of material and I still see the paint bleed.

Any ideas?




6 replies so far

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MrsN

987 posts in 3948 days


#1 posted 04-13-2018 03:34 PM

I have found that when using the fast dry poly, several thin coats are necessary. Fast dry poly is just regular poly with extra mineral spirits to thin it out.

When I have done this process, I have used a paint that I brush on. so while I am not “in the lines” the entire surface isn’t painted.

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John Smith

1889 posts in 585 days


#2 posted 04-13-2018 03:57 PM

another process that prevents paint bleed into wood grain is to
get the fastet drying paint you can find. usually, it is the cheap 99 cent brand
at wal-mart. the faster it dries, the less time it has to seep into the wood fibers.
quick light coats then sand off with belt sander. you must engrave a bit deeper
than normal to compensate for the material being removed. (Flat Black is the fasted drying).
that is how the flea market sign makers do it and it works.

try it on some some scrap wood . . . . YMMV.

Note: if the clear finish coat is not compatible with the black paint,
and it melts the black, it WILL bleed into the wood.

.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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jonlan

61 posts in 1310 days


#3 posted 04-13-2018 04:33 PM

Thanks for the pointers. I can try that. How do I tell if the paint is incompatible with the sealer? I suspect thats the issue. Maybe I need to try other sealers?

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John Smith

1889 posts in 585 days


#4 posted 04-13-2018 05:32 PM

I have learned 95% of what I know from trial and error.
what may work for one – may not work as well with another.
practice – test – and test some more.
eventually, you will find a product and technique that works best for you.
just try to remember that the longer a product stays wet, the deeper it goes into the wood.

try painting the engravings first on bare wood with flat black spray paint with VERY light coats.
sand off excess after paint is dry.
apply several VERY light coats of spray poly onto your project.

I have found that a belt sander with 60 grit will quickly remove the top layer of wood
and the excess paint – then finish up with the finish sander of your choice.
then – you can spray very light coats of poly over the entire panel. practice ~ practice ~ practice ~ practice.

[to avoid clogging your sandpapers with paint – don’t sand thick, wet paint].
a card or cabinet scraper will also remove a lot of excess paint fairly quickly.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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bonesbr549

1583 posts in 3490 days


#5 posted 04-13-2018 06:30 PM

how about covering with shellac, and then covering the surface with gator tape overlapping 50%.

Cut your pocket toolpath, and then paint and remove tape. Just a thought.

-- Sooner or later Liberals run out of other people's money.

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John Smith

1889 posts in 585 days


#6 posted 04-13-2018 07:41 PM

router bits and gator tape do not play well together.

but – along that line of thought, signmakers often use a vinyl product or even sticky-back
shelf paper for the same results. (with the exception of shellac ~ we don’t use it).

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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