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Forum topic by M2D2 posted 04-13-2018 01:16 PM 677 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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M2D2

26 posts in 475 days


04-13-2018 01:16 PM

Topic tags/keywords: drawer slide wood edge direct attach

Hey Folks,

I want to ask a question. I’m using solid maple (i believe specifically spelted – hardwood). What I wanted to know was, normally when you screw into wood, you want to screw into a side with grain on it, instead of the butt ends as its more structurally sound. Question is, What if you need to screw into the ends to suspend it. SO … take a piece of wood, lay it flat, so height 2”, depth is 10” and length is 60”. Now screw into the 2” portion on the ends, will you get enough bite into the wood that it won’t work itself loose over time? Should a plate be added to increase weight tolerance? Were not talking a large amount of weight maybe 50lbs, and its for attach drawer slides directly to the edge of the wood. Can I screw the the slide directly to the wood edge without complications?

Thanks for info.


10 replies so far

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1880 posts in 582 days


#1 posted 04-13-2018 01:20 PM

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 1195 days


#2 posted 04-13-2018 01:25 PM

Depends

View DanK's profile

DanK

26 posts in 3087 days


#3 posted 04-13-2018 01:33 PM

Endgrain doesn’t hold screws that well. One possible solution is to cross drill and install a dowel with the proper grain orientation to give the screw something solid to thread into.
Matthias Wandel used that technique to build a bed from construction lumber.
http://woodgears.ca/bed_frame/build.html

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

3543 posts in 1807 days


#4 posted 04-13-2018 01:41 PM

The biggest problem with screwing into end grain is that the screws can be easily pulled straight out. You would definitely not want to count on something holding if suspended from above (end grain pointed down). It will probably be okay with the end grain pointed sideways and the weight going down, especially if there is support on both sides of the board but it would definitely be better if you could attach the slides to side grain. If there is no support or you just want to be sure it never fails, one thing that would work is to cut a groove in the end grain and glue in a strip of wood to fill the groove that will give you some side grain to to drive the screw into. With a 2” wide board you could easily cut a 3/4” groove and put a 3/4 strip in there.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

432 posts in 845 days


#5 posted 04-13-2018 01:44 PM

I like that dowel idea. But if it’s for something quick and dirty there’s no reason this won’t work- especially in dense maple. Just change the joinery slightly and it’ll hold a ton. The screws are taking the weight in the first sketch, but they’re just holding the board in place in the second and all the weight is transferred from board to board.

If it’s in the middle of a piece like a shelf half way up the side, make a dado. Nice and sturdy then.

View Tony1212's profile

Tony1212

321 posts in 2154 days


#6 posted 04-13-2018 02:34 PM

Not sure what your application is, but in similar instances I will use a corner cleat. Use a square piece, say 3/4” by 3/4” by however long you need, and glue and screw (or nail) it so the long grain touches each board you’re trying to join.

For instance, in jamsoito’s picture above, there would be a square piece of wood (the cleat) in the inside corners where the two pieces meet. In those pictures, you’d be looking at the cleat’s end grain. Then you attach both pieces to the cleat rather than each other.

It’s pretty much SOP for shelving in many bookcases and small closets.

-- Tony, SW Chicago Suburbs

View Rich's profile

Rich

4564 posts in 1009 days


#7 posted 04-13-2018 03:18 PM

Is it just going to hang stationary? You’re probably OK with long screws, maybe 2 inches or more. Also, pre-drill and fill the hole with some good glue, like E6000.

If you want to get fancy, Nathan’s wooden strip would do the trick, however I’d go deeper than 3/4”.

Note that this is purely speculation and you will want to test it before you hang it.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View M2D2's profile

M2D2

26 posts in 475 days


#8 posted 04-14-2018 01:36 PM

Hey All, I may have solved it, but like your feedback on the idea.
My intentions are to use this drawer slide ( http://www.leevalley.com/en/hardware/Page.aspx?p=52492&cat=3,43597,43601 )

Here’s a sketch, although it might be a touch confusing the the slab is 60”L x 12”W x 2” thick (rough → +/- 2.25-2.5” thick sanded 2.0 → 2.25” thick)

https://www.flickr.com/photos/[email protected]/shares/1a6tA8

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M2D2

26 posts in 475 days


#9 posted 04-14-2018 03:02 PM

Hey Fellas,

This maybe a stupid question, but how far in from the edges of a table can i put the legs underneath? I mean, if I have 72” length and 28 inches wide, can I go 4 – 6 inches from the edges (on the 72” length), and 2” in from the 28 inch wide? Given the top is a 2” thick solid slab, I’m thinking its ok?

Opinions?

View Rich's profile

Rich

4564 posts in 1009 days


#10 posted 04-14-2018 03:10 PM


Hey Fellas,

This maybe a stupid question, but how far in from the edges of a table can i put the legs underneath? I mean, if I have 72” length and 28 inches wide, can I go 4 – 6 inches from the edges (on the 72” length), and 2” in from the 28 inch wide? Given the top is a 2” thick solid slab, I m thinking its ok?

- M2D2

Yes.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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