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Jointer knive setup and results

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Forum topic by scribble posted 04-13-2018 03:31 AM 778 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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scribble

204 posts in 2594 days


04-13-2018 03:31 AM

Topic tags/keywords: jig question jointer milling joining

I decided it was time to change/sharpen the blades on my Ridgid 6” jointer. I realized I didn’t have the tools to sharpen my original blades so in the interim i installed a new set of blades. I setup the blades using a magnetic jig I built with 3 magnets and some cabinet grade ply(fine woodworking video). I set all 3 blades using this jig and run a test piece of Pine through since I was still working some pine for a project. The jointer seemed to almost bit into the wood, it wanted to jump all around on the table and made some not normal sounds when cutting as well as sounding and looking like it was tearing out the wood instead of scooping/shaving it. I also noted that I was getting snipe on the end of the board which I don’t recall seeing before when using my jointer.
Im guessing either my setup is not correct or possibly the bevel of the new knifes are different from my originals.

I appreciate anyone who can help shed some light on this matter.

Thank you

Chris.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”


15 replies so far

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TheFridge

10858 posts in 1879 days


#1 posted 04-13-2018 04:23 AM

Sounds like your outfeed is too low.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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Rich

4491 posts in 983 days


#2 posted 04-13-2018 04:25 AM

Besides the magnetic setting jig, I like to use the Oneway Multi-Gauge to check my setting.

The knives should be flush with the out feed of the jointer, so using the Oneway you can check that it’s truly zero. The reason I like dial gauges is that, with a flat foot, you can rotate the head through its arc to get a reading and not have to worry about top dead center.

It’s also useful when you want to set the depth of cut. Put the body of the gauge on the in feed side and the foot on the out feet and you’ll see how deep of a cut you’re going to make.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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Aj2

2280 posts in 2191 days


#3 posted 04-13-2018 05:19 AM

I agree with the guys about outfeed too low. And double check knifes with a second method the stick drag won’t cost you anything. Keep at it till they all measure the same

-- Aj

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Lazyman

3429 posts in 1781 days


#4 posted 04-13-2018 12:22 PM

I’ll ask the “duh”’ question just in case…You didn’t put them in backwards did you? The bevel should be towards the board, not away. I think if you had that reversed you would get that sort of bouncing effect.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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scribble

204 posts in 2594 days


#5 posted 04-13-2018 12:39 PM

I did verify the blades were installed correctly. It sounds like my blades are set too high causing my outfeed table to appear lower that it should. In my jointer there are screws underneath the set the hieght of the blades. When using the magnetic version should I even bother with the screws once I have the blades locked down. I am wondering if when I set the blades and then moved the height screws to be snug I may have over tightened and moved the blades up.

I am going to try and get back to my shop this weekend but main job and on call tow duty might keep me away too much.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

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scribble

204 posts in 2594 days


#6 posted 04-13-2018 12:54 PM

DOUBLE POST

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

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Lazyman

3429 posts in 1781 days


#7 posted 04-13-2018 01:18 PM

Another thing to note is that you need to make sure that you have the cutter head positioned so that the knives are at exactly their highest point as you set them using a magnetic jig. I usually scribe a line on the fence to help position the knife and you may have to find a way to hold the cutter head in place so it doesn’t move from the highpoint while setting the knives. Overtightening the set screws can definitely cause them to move out of alignment.

A way to check the height relative to the outfeed is to lay a steel ruler on the edge on the outfeed so that it hangs over the cutter head. As you rotate the cutter head by hand, the ruler should just barely move as the blade grazes it.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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SweetTea

430 posts in 1053 days


#8 posted 04-13-2018 01:22 PM

You won’t know for sure without a dial indicator with a magnetic base. You can get the dial indicator for less than $20 and the magnetic base for $12 at Harbor Freight, with a coupon you might be looking at $20 total. I would never attempt to set my jointer knives without one. Look up the long 30+ minute video on YouTube from Fine Woodworking or whoever. and then watch some other jointer knife setting videos from the wood whisperer or who ever. One is like 35-40 minutes and the second one is long too.,

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scribble

204 posts in 2594 days


#9 posted 04-13-2018 02:57 PM

I think my biggest mistake was not marking TDC before taking my knifes out. I am going to try and find TDC with one and then try and reset the all at outfeed table hight at the point of TDC.

-- If you can't read it Scribble wrote it!! “Experience is merely the name men gave to their mistakes.”

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John_

202 posts in 2099 days


#10 posted 04-13-2018 03:51 PM

There is a pretty easy way to find the highest point of your knives using a wooden stick. (You basically find how far the stick moves and then find the middle point)

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hairy

2851 posts in 3926 days


#11 posted 04-13-2018 05:43 PM

When I bought my jointer, I also bought a jig to set the knives. Jointer pal, or something like that. Last year I changed the knives and quickly discovered a hatred for setting jointer knives.

After a few attempts following the directions, Einstein’s definition of insanity came to mind, so I tried something different.

I set the new knives all the way down into the cutter head slot, holding them down with a block of wood, and tightening the screws. You may have to rig up something to prevent the cutter head from moving.

Then I leveled the knives to the infeed and outfeed tables. You want the knives at the highest point.

After that, I ran a board through and adjusted for snipe. Snipe at the back, raise the outfeed. Snipe at the front, raise the infeed. I hope I remembered that right. I got CRS.

My thinking is that with magnets or dial indicator, you are trying to establish a common height to 3 knives, somewhere between minimum and maximum travel. And you also have side to side adjustment to consider. Even on a cheapo jointer, the knife slots in the cutter head will be machined pretty accurately. Placing them at the lowest point that they can travel is all the way down. This way all the knives are set to same height, the only thing left is table adjustment.

I’ve never seen or heard of this anywhere. I’m sure somebody’s going to say it’s time for my medicine, but it worked for me.

-- My reality check bounced...

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TheFridge

10858 posts in 1879 days


#12 posted 04-13-2018 06:34 PM


Last year I changed the knives and quickly discovered a hatred for setting jointer knives.

- hairy

My first didn’t have jack screws or springs and the second only has springs. The biggest reason I bit the bullet and went shelix.

If you used a new set vs a set that was already sharpened and didn’t change jack screw height then there is your height problem.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

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SweetTea

430 posts in 1053 days


#13 posted 04-13-2018 10:56 PM



When I bought my jointer, I also bought a jig to set the knives. Jointer pal, or something like that. Last year I changed the knives and quickly discovered a hatred for setting jointer knives.

After a few attempts following the directions, Einstein s definition of insanity came to mind, so I tried something different.

I set the new knives all the way down into the cutter head slot, holding them down with a block of wood, and tightening the screws. You may have to rig up something to prevent the cutter head from moving.

Then I leveled the knives to the infeed and outfeed tables. You want the knives at the highest point.

After that, I ran a board through and adjusted for snipe. Snipe at the back, raise the outfeed. Snipe at the front, raise the infeed. I hope I remembered that right. I got CRS.

My thinking is that with magnets or dial indicator, you are trying to establish a common height to 3 knives, somewhere between minimum and maximum travel. And you also have side to side adjustment to consider. Even on a cheapo jointer, the knife slots in the cutter head will be machined pretty accurately. Placing them at the lowest point that they can travel is all the way down. This way all the knives are set to same height, the only thing left is table adjustment.

I ve never seen or heard of this anywhere. I m sure somebody s going to say it s time for my medicine, but it worked for me.

- hairy

This is a great idea. Wish that I would have thought of it. Why not just set your jointer knives all the way down in the cutterhead, that way you know they are all straight and no need to worry about if you got the correct side to side settings, then adjust your outfeed table to the appropriate height?

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Aj2

2280 posts in 2191 days


#14 posted 04-14-2018 12:57 AM

No no the knife should be set out of the head to make up the cutting circle that was designed. If it’s too far out your will not get the most out of the hook angle of your head.
Here is a photo that best represents a very common set up. Also make sure your using the correct thickness knife that will change the projection.
To set knifes I would like to suggest a dial indicater and a round mushroom tip. And get a decent indicator those cheap one are too twitchy.

-- Aj

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davezedlee

31 posts in 1218 days


#15 posted 04-14-2018 03:16 PM

you can also set them by sound

same concept as John H posted, except TDC will just slightly brush your straightedge if its level, but won’t if its too low… the skill part is in being able to advance the knife height in minimal increments without shifting once you start to tighten down, and getting each side of each knife to produce the “same” scraping sound next to each set screw

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