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Wondering about AquaCoat grain filler

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Forum topic by ric53 posted 04-07-2018 01:10 PM 915 views 0 times favorited 3 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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ric53

194 posts in 1942 days


04-07-2018 01:10 PM

Morning All. I have just completed a desk for a customer that wanted stained Red Oak. The top has yet to be stained but will be stained with a darker stain close to an A&C color. I will need to fill the grain on the top but am unsure weather Aqua Coat will work over an oil stain since it is water based. Also can I use a thinned down poly as a sanding sealer before I apply it? I normally don’t stain my stuff and am afraid of screwing up the stain using a product that I have never used before. Thanks you in advance for your imput.

-- Ric, Mazomanie


3 replies so far

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Rich

4579 posts in 1012 days


#1 posted 04-07-2018 09:40 PM

Obviously you need to cut some sample boards and prepare them just as the table top has been. Same grit, etc. Anything you want to try, do it on them, not your table top.

Aqua Coat definitely requires some sanding to flatten it. You can squeegee it down pretty smooth when you apply it, but it still will require sanding. Also, you won’t likely get a perfect fill on the first application. I’ve found at least 2 and sometime 3 or 4 are required to get a piano finish with no grain showing. Doing that much filling and sanding is going to be a challenge to keep your stain from getting damaged.

Starting off with a couple of coats of whatever topcoat you plan to use before applying the Aqua Coat would help some and give you a barrier to protect the stain.

An option to consider is an oil based filler that you can color to match your stain. Something like Famowood can be tinted with the same stain you’re using. Apply it before you stain so you can sand it smooth, then stain. See how it looks on one of your test boards. You will probably have to try some different recipes to get the look you want.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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ric53

194 posts in 1942 days


#2 posted 04-08-2018 01:59 PM

Thanks Rich. I’ve got plenty of scrap pieces that I have preped for just that purpose. The Oak is rift sawn and when it is sanded to 220 grit it is almost flat. Like everything else the first time is a little stressful.

-- Ric, Mazomanie

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Rich

4579 posts in 1012 days


#3 posted 04-08-2018 02:25 PM

I always hate writing that about test pieces. It sounds condescending, but I’m amazed at how often people post here about projects they’ve screwed up with a bad finish, so I figure it’s worth tossing out there.

I don’t have any experience with rift sawn red oak, but probably applying enough layers of top coat will give you a smooth finish, assuming you’re using a finish that builds. I’ve done that with African mahogany, which is really porous, and it came out glass smooth.

I’m sure you’ll make it look great.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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