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Effect of Pressure Treated Lumber on Blades

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Forum topic by CRAIGCLICK posted 04-05-2018 09:54 PM 788 views 0 times favorited 10 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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CRAIGCLICK

117 posts in 579 days


04-05-2018 09:54 PM

I am embarking on a shelving project and will require use of a dado blade on PT lumber.

I am a newbie when it comes to working with treated lumber (and to woodworking in general) and I am very afraid of messing up my expensive dado blade. Am I OK using for that purpose, or should I figure out another way?

Thank you in advance for your help with what’s probably a dumb question.

-- Somewhere between raising hell and amazing grace.


10 replies so far

View Bill White's profile

Bill White

5227 posts in 4466 days


#1 posted 04-05-2018 10:09 PM

Wash ‘em good and lube after ya use them.
I use Simple Green.

-- [email protected]

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gargey

1013 posts in 1281 days


#2 posted 04-05-2018 10:09 PM

Dunno about blunting but remember its toxic. Don’t breathe the dust.

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Klondikecraftsman

52 posts in 558 days


#3 posted 04-05-2018 10:52 PM

It will be no different than untreated lumber. Wear minimum N95 dust mask, no facial hair. You will need to treat the wood in the dado or it will void the treatment warranty and will rot.

-- It is a sin to covet your neighbor’s wife, but his woodpile is fair game.

View John Smith's profile (online now)

John Smith

2012 posts in 668 days


#4 posted 04-05-2018 11:14 PM

outdoor shelving project with P/T lumber?? sketches would help with accurate feedback.

I have made hundreds and hundreds of cuts on 4×4 and 6×6” P/T posts
with my 12” Dewalt miter saw and never washed it after use.
some posts were wet and soggy fresh from the plant and some bone dry.
I noticed no difference in blade wear or pitch build up between P/T wood, hard pine or oak
and miscellaneous aluminum extrusions using stacked dado blades.
when I worked for Lockheed-Martin, I cut hundreds of 7/8” dado cuts on P/T posts
for skids where the 3/4” steel bandings go.

as far as the blade condition goes, if it makes you feel better, wash it and oil it after use.
+2 on the respiratory precautions and safety glasses.

dispose of the P/T sawdust in the regular trash – not in the wood or yard waste recycle bins.

.

-- I am a painter. That's what I do. I paint things --

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CRAIGCLICK

117 posts in 579 days


#5 posted 04-06-2018 03:26 PM

Thank you for your replies.

In retrospect, I think PT would be overkill in my application. I am going to build shelving for my garage and was planning on using PT 4×4 (or sistered 2×4) as vertical supports from floor to ceiling. I was considering PT because the wood would come into direct contact with my garage floor, but my garage is dry and reasonably bug-free.

I don’t have any drawings because I’m just shaking the idea out in my brain right now, but the plan is to use the 4×4 on the front and rear of the shelving and dado three sides for notched plywood to fit into. That way I have continuous shelves for 22 feet of wall space. Not sure if I’m explaining it clearly or not.

-- Somewhere between raising hell and amazing grace.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1356 posts in 2458 days


#6 posted 04-06-2018 04:21 PM

You can get metal or plastic anchors for the posts that will keep them from sitting on the concrete. The anchors can be attached to the floor to keep the posts in position.

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theart

130 posts in 1060 days


#7 posted 04-06-2018 04:37 PM


I don t have any drawings because I m just shaking the idea out in my brain right now, but the plan is to use the 4×4 on the front and rear of the shelving and dado three sides for notched plywood to fit into. That way I have continuous shelves for 22 feet of wall space. Not sure if I m explaining it clearly or not.

I’m guessing that you want to notch the shelves so that they fit flush to the wall in the back? Unless you’re going to break that up into a bunch of really short spans (<18>) plywood shelves are going to sag badly. I would frame the bottoms of the shelves with vertical 2×4. The 2×4s sit tightly in the dados, then the plywood sits on top with notches to get around the posts.

And PT is definitely overkill. You cold use some specialized standoffs or just some landscape pavers to keep the wood off of the ground.

View CRAIGCLICK's profile

CRAIGCLICK

117 posts in 579 days


#8 posted 04-06-2018 04:57 PM


I don t have any drawings because I m just shaking the idea out in my brain right now, but the plan is to use the 4×4 on the front and rear of the shelving and dado three sides for notched plywood to fit into. That way I have continuous shelves for 22 feet of wall space. Not sure if I m explaining it clearly or not.

I m guessing that you want to notch the shelves so that they fit flush to the wall in the back? Unless you re going to break that up into a bunch of really short spans () plywood shelves are going to sag badly. I would frame the bottoms of the shelves with vertical 2×4. The 2×4s sit tightly in the dados, then the plywood sits on top with notches to get around the posts.

And PT is definitely overkill. You cold use some specialized standoffs or just some landscape pavers to keep the wood off of the ground.

- theart

That makes sense. I didn’t really consider sag, so I was just going to use the plywood. And yes, I was wanting to notch the shelves so that they fit against the wall.

The 2×4 will also give me something to anchor against the wall.

-- Somewhere between raising hell and amazing grace.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2201 posts in 3948 days


#9 posted 04-06-2018 05:04 PM

There are a couple of ways to deal with the possible moisture problem coming from the cement floor. Easiest is to put a piece of asphalt roofing material under the posts. Next is a metal plate or there are metal post supports that are constructed with about a 1/2” air space built in which is even better.

-- Les B, Oregon

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ChefHDAN

1457 posts in 3355 days


#10 posted 04-06-2018 07:57 PM

FWIW, and depending on what sort of weight you’re planning to store on the shelves, you’ll lose alot of storage space to the dimensions of the lumber building with 4×4 & 2×4. There are lot of variables not knowing your design, but I bought a house where the previous owner used 4×4 & 2×4 to shelve the garage, and I replaced it using ripped 2×4 s and had a great deal more usable shelf space. For a couple of the lower shelves that were going to get heavier loads I added a piece of angle iron on the front ledge for rigidity. Just my 2 pennies but you’d be surprised how strong the ripped 2×4s are.

-- I've decided 1 mistake is really 2 opportunities to learn.. learn how to fix it... and learn how to not repeat it

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