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For wood working purposes what is an acceptable error for blade vertical alignment for a table saw?

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Forum topic by MiniMe posted 04-05-2018 02:52 PM 4952 views 0 times favorited 29 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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MiniMe

19 posts in 474 days


04-05-2018 02:52 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question tablesaw

Here are the tools that I am using to align my blade to the miter slots:
1) Neoteck DTI Digtial Dial NTK012 indicates 0.01mm/0.0005”
2) Neoteck Digital Level NTK034 Box (Resolution: ±0.01 Degrees at 0-1 and 89-90 Degrees; ±0.05 Degrees at the Rest Accuracy: ±0.1 Degrees at 0-1 and 89-90 Degrees; ±0.02 Degrees at the Rest)
3) Digital angle finder https://www.generaltools.com/5-in-digital-angle-finder Accuracy: ±0.3° Resolution: 0.1°
When I test #2 against the 90 degrees of a carpenter square is dead on !
The digital level is not that stable and I am thinking about returning it

My question is: what is an acceptable deviation from 90 for a table saw like Rigid TS3650? (blade raised at 3” above the table level and it should be as square as possible to the table top)

I guess it will depend on the task so here are my near future plans:
-picture frames
-kitchen island frames
-shelves
-bathroom vanities

At full height I get a 44.8 for 45 degrees and 89.6 at 90 degrees with tool #3
The above mean that I can’t push the blade any more toward any of the extreme angles

Tablesaw is Ridgid TS3650


29 replies so far

View Steve's profile

Steve

1360 posts in 1005 days


#1 posted 04-05-2018 03:14 PM

I wouldn’t accept any deviation from 45 or 90. You should be able to adjust the stops to get your dead on

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

19 posts in 474 days


#2 posted 04-05-2018 03:18 PM


I wouldn t accept any deviation from 45 or 90. You should be able to adjust the stops to get your dead on

- Steve


Hi Steve
Thank for the reply
Sorry for the beginner like question but what do you call stops in this context?

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4070 days


#3 posted 04-05-2018 03:19 PM

Digital tools are great but we’ve been setting
up table saws without them for a long time.

Your 90 degree setting on the blade just needs
to be close enough that your cuts come out
as 90 degrees when you measure them by
eye with a square. There’s going to be deviations
in flatness of both the table saw top and the
material you run across it. These deviations
generally don’t produce enough error to
cause problems.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4579 posts in 1012 days


#4 posted 04-05-2018 03:31 PM

What Loren said. Additionally, you can compensate for any error by alternating the boards so that if for instance, your blade is really at 90.1º, you’ll get one angle at 90.1º and the other at 89.9º and when you join them you have a perfect 180º.

Regarding miters, you’re better off building a sled with fences at 90º to one another. Again, they don’t have to be precisely 45º to the blade, just 90º to one another, and by cutting one piece on one side and the other on the other side, they will join up square.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View CRAIGCLICK's profile

CRAIGCLICK

117 posts in 496 days


#5 posted 04-05-2018 03:32 PM

I wouldn t accept any deviation from 45 or 90. You should be able to adjust the stops to get your dead on

- Steve

Hi Steve
Thank for the reply
Sorry for the beginner like question but what do you call stops in this context?

- MiniMe

“Stops” are mechanism which limit the blade movement so that when you tilt the blade, it stops at exactly 45 and 90 degrees.

On your particular saw, they are the two screws on either side of the insert in the top of the table. The directions for adjustment are on page 25 and 26 of the user manual.

If you don’t have the manual, you can download a free copy here: http://powertool.manualsonline.com/manuals/mfg/ridgid/ts3650_ts2400ls.html?p=1

I recommend reading the entire thing.

For setting blade square to the table I use a digital gauge to start, and then I check it with a precise t-square before making a few cuts on a scrap piece of wood and checking for square. I do this almost every time I start using the saw. Time (in my case) is cheaper than lumber.

-- Somewhere between raising hell and amazing grace.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5457 posts in 2773 days


#6 posted 04-05-2018 03:44 PM

99.6 at 90 degrees with tool #3

That’s way too far off, 9.6° , needs to be a lot closer to 90°.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View WyattCo's profile

WyattCo

93 posts in 526 days


#7 posted 04-05-2018 03:56 PM

You need a Wixey my friend.

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

19 posts in 474 days


#8 posted 04-05-2018 04:03 PM


99.6 at 90 degrees with tool #3

That s way too far off, 9.6° , needs to a lot closer to 90°.

- bondogaposis


that was a typo it is 89.6

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

19 posts in 474 days


#9 posted 04-05-2018 04:06 PM


I wouldn t accept any deviation from 45 or 90. You should be able to adjust the stops to get your dead on

- Steve

Hi Steve
Thank for the reply
Sorry for the beginner like question but what do you call stops in this context?

- MiniMe

“Stops” are mechanism which limit the blade movement so that when you tilt the blade, it stops at exactly 45 and 90 degrees.

On your particular saw, they are the two screws on either side of the insert in the top of the table. The directions for adjustment are on page 25 and 26 of the user manual.

If you don t have the manual, you can download a free copy here: http://powertool.manualsonline.com/manuals/mfg/ridgid/ts3650_ts2400ls.html?p=1

I recommend reading the entire thing.

For setting blade square to the table I use a digital gauge to start, and then I check it with a precise t-square before making a few cuts on a scrap piece of wood and checking for square. I do this almost every time I start using the saw. Time (in my case) is cheaper than lumber.

- CRAIGCLICK

well thanks a lot for that link , I downloaded a manual which I believed to be complete…guess what there are many things that are missing from my version of the manual. What you linked above is more detailed and complete

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

278 posts in 953 days


#10 posted 04-05-2018 04:07 PM

Check out some machinists blocks for setup. Even cheaper ones are going to be more accurate than is needed for woodworking tools. You can pickup a set from amazon for about $30 that has a 45/90 and a 30/60/90.

View CRAIGCLICK's profile

CRAIGCLICK

117 posts in 496 days


#11 posted 04-05-2018 04:26 PM

Happy to help! Now go make some sawdust!

-- Somewhere between raising hell and amazing grace.

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12845 posts in 2802 days


#12 posted 04-05-2018 04:37 PM

If it looks 90d as checked with a known true square, you should be good. I use a Wixey now because it’s so fast at setting any angle.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View MiniMe's profile

MiniMe

19 posts in 474 days


#13 posted 04-05-2018 04:56 PM


If it looks 90d as checked with a known true square, you should be good. I use a Wixey now because it s so fast at setting any angle.

- Woodknack


not sure what 90d means ..degrees?
I bought that crap above described .. Neoteck Digital Level NTK034 Box
...you set it up to zero in reference to the table saw..you move it 2-3 mm in any direction ..the display shows you have an angle anywhere between0.08 and 0.16… I am returning it today

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12845 posts in 2802 days


#14 posted 04-05-2018 05:16 PM


If it looks 90d as checked with a known true square, you should be good. I use a Wixey now because it s so fast at setting any angle.

- Woodknack

not sure what 90d means ..degrees?
I bought that crap above described .. Neoteck Digital Level NTK034 Box
...you set it up to zero in reference to the table saw..you move it 2-3 mm in any direction ..the display shows you have an angle anywhere between0.08 and 0.16… I am returning it today

- MiniMe

90d = ninety degrees
I thought it would be obvious from context, my bad.

I don’t know anything about Neotek.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View 01ntrain's profile

01ntrain

259 posts in 1493 days


#15 posted 04-05-2018 05:20 PM

That tool is an acceptable device if you’re a trim carpenter, but it’s pretty flimsy and unstable to be used as a setup tool for machines. Either follow Loren’s advice with the square, or get a Wixey. Me, I use the tried and true method of using a square and call it a day.

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