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Forum topic by FreddieMac posted 04-05-2018 01:28 PM 757 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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FreddieMac

147 posts in 768 days


04-05-2018 01:28 PM

I have purchased the DELTA 13-Amp 10-in Carbide-Tipped Table Saw from Lowes last year and I really love how this saw operates. This is the first table saw I have ever had to do wood working. I really like the saw except for the lack of a feature. No way to attach a feather board to the rip fence.

This is the type of fence. I am looking for ideas on how to attach a rail or something to the rip fence that will allow both sides to be untouched. I do not know how I ever did so much woodwork without a table saw. Any suggestions would be appreciated.


17 replies so far

View GR8HUNTER's profile

GR8HUNTER

6223 posts in 1132 days


#1 posted 04-05-2018 01:32 PM

i very simply built a box that fits over top of whole fence this is used for my sacrificial fence also plus its very easy to build one …if you need me to i can take a picture of it and post…... HOPE THIS HELPS :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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dday

172 posts in 1849 days


#2 posted 04-05-2018 01:39 PM

I don’t think you mean to attach a feather board to the fence..
however, to attach other items—a tenoning jig, etc
you build a box as stated, out of stable plywood that is shaped like a U and fits snuggly a square over the fence ,
then you can attach your accessories to it.
I have several jigs that do this, two of the most used is a sacrificial fence for my dado stack and a tall fence ( 8in) to help with cutting tall/long items

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FreddieMac

147 posts in 768 days


#3 posted 04-05-2018 01:51 PM

I use feather boards on my router’s fence to keep the piece from rising when it encounters the bit. I am sure I can just clamp a feather board to the rip fence of the table saw for the same reason. But, I was hoping for a different solution, I really do not like using so many clamps because they tend to get in the way.

Is the box just a friction fit in the U of the t-square?

I am learning this table saw, most of my projects in the past were designed around the fact that I did not have a table saw. Now that I have one, I am trying to find the best ways to use it. I find I use it more and more and almost cannot believe I was doing woodwork in the past without one.

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GR8HUNTER

6223 posts in 1132 days


#4 posted 04-05-2018 02:05 PM

yes mine is friction fit and i used 1 inch plywood so i can still use my ruler worked out very nicely :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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FreddieMac

147 posts in 768 days


#5 posted 04-05-2018 02:23 PM

That is good to know, I was worried a friction fit would not hold, I will try that

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GR8HUNTER

6223 posts in 1132 days


#6 posted 04-05-2018 02:31 PM

well you have to control that i think i built mine with sheet of paper for spacing been so long i cant remember to good :<))

-- Tony---- Reinholds,Pa.------ REMEMBER TO ALWAYS HAVE FUN

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WhyMe

1160 posts in 1981 days


#7 posted 04-05-2018 02:44 PM

I made a box out of MDF that stays on my fence. There is a center ‘L’ shaped bolt on each end that holds the box on tight to the fence and then there are two adjustment screws on each end to help adjust the box so the side to the table is 90 deg along the whole length.


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FreddieMac

147 posts in 768 days


#8 posted 04-05-2018 04:02 PM

How do you handle the offset for your ruler, just add the width of the board?

View WhyMe's profile

WhyMe

1160 posts in 1981 days


#9 posted 04-05-2018 04:17 PM

I don’t use the built-in ruler for precise cutting. But when making cuts that are close enough for rough work, I have to add .75”.

View nkdenton's profile

nkdenton

5 posts in 891 days


#10 posted 04-08-2018 03:13 PM

I sometimes experience a slight rise of a very long workpiece when ripping, e.g. Ripping an 8 ft 2×6 but it’s never caused a problem and I’m usually able to counter it by adjusting the way I hold and feed the piece. I’ve never considered using a feather board because most pieces that tend to ride up are large and probably wouldn’t respond very well to one, anyway. IMHO, smaller workpieces like trim pieces, plywood, etc are better held flat by a good push block. Just this guy’s opinion. I have seen some interesting homemade push blocks that are built up with runners that allow it straddle the blade and hold the piece flat on both sides of the blade. That seems to be a better method for a table saw application where the workpiece riding up is a concern.

-- What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly. - Thomas Paine

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2829 days


#11 posted 04-08-2018 03:26 PM

Take a look at this parts diagram for the T2. Looks like the fence is attached with a runner and two bolts. Depending on how creative and adventurous you wanted to be you could take it apart and manufacture your own panel with the feature you want made into it.

https://www.ereplacementparts.com/delta-36t30-type-fence-parts-c-3275_13780_13891.html

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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Woodknack

12843 posts in 2800 days


#12 posted 04-08-2018 04:46 PM

Can’t you drill and tap the top of the fence? Then you can fabricate and attach whatever you want.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View Sawdust4Blood's profile

Sawdust4Blood

408 posts in 3442 days


#13 posted 04-08-2018 05:46 PM

Since you’re new to the table saw, I’m curious why you feel that you need a feather board on the fence to hold the work piece down. You mentioned that you use one on your router table and that’s perfectly reasonable to maintain a consistent profile; however, I’m curious as to what problem you think it solves on the table saw. If you’re worried about climb on a non-through cut such as a dado, I think that push blocks might be a better solution than a feather board. On a through cut, climbing shouldn’t be an issue and the anti-kickback pawls on the splitter that came with your saw and a good push handle (such as the ones shown here http://lumberjocks.com/projects/19698) should be more than sufficient to keep the work piece down.

The thing that I would be worried about feather boards on the fence is that I don’t see what problem it would be solving but I can see where it might get in the way and temp you to move your hand closer to blade.

-- Greg, Severn MD

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FreddieMac

147 posts in 768 days


#14 posted 04-08-2018 07:52 PM

Based on all the advice, here is what I came up with. I can flip it left or right and have put my feather board on it. I used a friction fit, and some shop scraps to put it together.

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runswithscissors

3052 posts in 2445 days


#15 posted 04-09-2018 12:09 AM

I disagree that blade climbing on a through cut isn’t a problem. And it’s maybe worse on relatively short and narrow pieces because your hands have to be closer to the blade. Once you’re well into the cut, the problem mostly goes away. That’s why a lot of us use a push shoe rather than a push stick. The examples in Sawdustforblood’s post are push shoes. The heel of the shoe does the pushing, while the sole (or toe) does the holding down. Also, many of us don’t use the saw’s splitter with pawls, for various reasons. And of course the pawls aren’t going to be effective until the wood is past the blade.

The Gripper is simply a gussied up push shoe. I don’t have one, but a lot of people like them.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

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