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Maple finish options?

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Forum topic by jaidee posted 04-01-2018 05:51 PM 695 views 0 times favorited 13 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jaidee

51 posts in 3199 days


04-01-2018 05:51 PM

I have made an edge grain vanity top for bathroom from soft maple. Am testing different mixes of stain but not happy even with stain control pre coat. Now trying mixes with Danish Oil and Tung Oil. Would like to end with several coats of WaterLox Satin clear. Can anyone explain the difference between tung oil and Danish Oil other than color? Is one over the other redundant? Will also rub out final coat with some kind of wax I imagine. Thoughts are greatly appreciated.

-- I used to be all thumbs......'til I got a tablesaw!


13 replies so far

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BalsaWood

154 posts in 1578 days


#1 posted 04-01-2018 06:09 PM

Danish oil can be composed of quite a few different things. It can be an oil varnish mix or purely polymerized linseed oil (such as Tried and True)- pretty much depends on the brand. Tung oil can also be confusing. You might see 100% tung oil or something like else like a mix of tung oil and mineral spirits such as Formbys. 100% tung oil takes a long time to dry and only provides minimal protection against water. If it is for the bathroom, varnish, poly, or some pre-catalyzed lacquer would be better.

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Loren

10477 posts in 4068 days


#2 posted 04-01-2018 06:36 PM

Danish oil is a general term used for products
which mimic the appearance of oil finishes
used on mid-century furniture. The only one
I’ve used is Watco, which is a sort of a wiping
varnish with stain added. You flood the surface,
wait for it to tack up and then rub off the excess
quickly. It builds very thin, hardly perceivable.
I think the “natural” color of Watco natural comes
from linseed oil and perhaps the amber color of other
resins in there that speed the curing.

I’ve also used the approach discussed here

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jaidee

51 posts in 3199 days


#3 posted 04-02-2018 02:58 PM

Thank you for the info, and the Fine Woodworking forum was helpful also. While I agree that a poly/film finish is the most water resistant I am concerned about it not flexing enough for wood movement over longer time. Any kind of refinishing would be difficult as the sinks are vessels on top of the wood rather than undermount. Refreshing a couple coats of Waterlox periodically seems much easier to me. I plan on several coats of Waterlox sealer and a few coats of Waterlox Satin to finish (and yes all 6 sides of the top will get equal treatment). Where I have been having real difficulty is in getting the color she wants without blotching. After a lot of experimenting (Watco Danish Oil did not make the final cut) I think I have found the color by mixing 1 part Minwax Red Mahogany stain with 3 parts Minwax Golden Pecan stain. It has the red tones she wants to get away from the “oak” look that has been there the last 20 years but the Pecan adds warmth and some copper/gold tones.

One last question…..I am trying both Stain Control and Boiled Linseed Oil as first coat on Soft Maple sanded to 220 grit. Does the BLO essentially do the same as Stain Control? I like the way BLO brings out the grain. If not, could I put Stain Control over the BLO or would that create other issues? Thanks again for your thoughts and guidance.

-- I used to be all thumbs......'til I got a tablesaw!

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OSU55

2359 posts in 2409 days


#4 posted 04-02-2018 04:47 PM

Here is some info that will help you with blotch control. Any of the oil based finishes can be colored with dye, I use WD Lockwood oil based, naptha to dissolve the powder. I would use a hi grade marine varnish for a bathroom vanity thats going to have standing water left on it.

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jaidee

51 posts in 3199 days


#5 posted 04-04-2018 02:14 PM

Well I went with the Stain Control and a mix of Red Mahogany/Golden Pecan stain. I didn’t get good enough coverage with the Stain Control on part of the top as the stain took darker there. But I was able to blend it some to make the differences more subtle I guess. Put first coat of WaterLox Sealer on yesterday and it is starting to look like my test blocks. That’s encouraging, as it looked pretty horrific after I put the stain on! But I trusted my test and went forward. I’ll try to post a pic when it’s done.

-- I used to be all thumbs......'til I got a tablesaw!

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OSU55

2359 posts in 2409 days


#6 posted 04-04-2018 07:49 PM

What “Stain Control” product did you use and what application process did you follow?

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jaidee

51 posts in 3199 days


#7 posted 04-04-2018 09:19 PM

Only product I could find locally was “Minwax Pre-Stain Wood Conditioner”. Instructions said apply liberally and allow to soak in…. apply stain within 2 hours. On my test pieces if I waited more than an hour it actually prevented any stain penetration at all, 30-45 minutes seemed to be the sweet spot. I waited a little over 30 minutes. What I did not do was check to see if there was uneven absorption in spots prior to applying stain. There were a couple pieces that, in hindsight, probably could have used a second coat after 10-15 minutes. I was able to work the stain a bit to make the transitions more gradual/subtle and after 2 coats of WaterLox it is actually looking pretty good.

For future reference, is there a stain control product that is better than others? I would like to get some to keep on hand. Also, I may order some wood dyes and try them in lieu of stain to see if I prefer the results. Any suggestions on which dyes I should consider?

Thanks again for your thoughts.

jd

-- I used to be all thumbs......'til I got a tablesaw!

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OSU55

2359 posts in 2409 days


#8 posted 04-05-2018 12:14 PM

See post 4 above. The link explains blotch control. MW has 2 versions ob and wb, sounds like you used the ob, which is like using ms, pretty useless. I prefer dyes, both ob – wd lockwood, and wb – transtint. Very easy to mix your own colors abd do layered coloring.

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jaidee

51 posts in 3199 days


#9 posted 04-05-2018 07:05 PM

Thank you…..already plotting next project!

-- I used to be all thumbs......'til I got a tablesaw!

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jaidee

51 posts in 3199 days


#10 posted 04-18-2018 02:51 PM

Okay…..new challenge. 5 coats Waterlox sealer, 2 coats Waterlox satin. At least 24 hours or more between coats. Sanded 320 after 3rd coat, 5th coat and between satin coats. Let dry 48 hours. 0000 steel wool with clear paste wax, but didn’t buff out evenly. wiped down with soft cloth dampened with mineral spirits to strip the wax down. let dry overnight. steel wool again with paste wax. buffed out better but not “clean”. left overnight, tried again to buff out the dull spots (where I assumed there was excess wax) but no joy. Another coat of wax with steel wool, but still won’t buff out cleanly, there are dull spots and streaks that are easily visible in reflected light.

While the Satin finish was nice it didn’t have the luster I was looking for that you get with wax finish. But I’m not getting it with the wax either. I’m frustrated with the time and energy I’ve got into this and am about ready to strip it down with spirits and settle for the Waterlox finish, or wet sand with mineral oil at 1000-1500 grit and see where that gets me. Afraid to do much more as I want to have at least 4 coats worth to keep seal (bathroom vanity top) and would have to sand down to ensure all wax gone before any more coats of Waterlox (final option?).

Any helpful thoughts or suggestions would be greatly appreciated…...going to take a few days off to do some skiing before tackling next step.

jd

-- I used to be all thumbs......'til I got a tablesaw!

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OSU55

2359 posts in 2409 days


#11 posted 04-18-2018 03:41 PM

Need to let the finish cure, not just dry, at least a week longer is better. Wet sanding is the way to get an even sheen, I like lamp oil, mineral oil is too hi viscosity. Use some sort of flexible sanding block, start at 1000, where to stop in hi grits up to you, depends on what gloss you want. I finish with the white scotchbrite stuff with a rotary polisher. For hi gloss I use auto finishing polishes, Macguairs.

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jaidee

51 posts in 3199 days


#12 posted 04-18-2018 08:48 PM

Okay, so first order is to strip off the paste wax. Wiping it down with mineral spirits should do the trick, assuming I haven’t worked the wax into the finish by not letting it fully cure. Or should I be taking it down with 220 and building up a couple more coats of Waterlox, letting it cure a full week?

-- I used to be all thumbs......'til I got a tablesaw!

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OSU55

2359 posts in 2409 days


#13 posted 04-18-2018 09:19 PM

MS should strip the wax. The wet sanding will get it as well. You wont be removing much film thickness, you probably have enough build.

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