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Hanging Dust Collection Piping on a Drywall Ceiling?

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Forum topic by jimintx posted 04-01-2018 05:02 PM 1589 views 0 times favorited 16 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jimintx

916 posts in 1978 days


04-01-2018 05:02 PM

Topic tags/keywords: piping ceiling dust collection system suspension

I am nearing the install of some hard plastic piping for dust collection. To make it work well I will have some runs along the ceiling, as many folks already have.

I would like to learn how some of you have chosen to hang such piping on a drywall ceiling, and how well you like it after a while. Comments and photos appreciated.

I know about metal strapping with the series of holes. I know you can just wrap wire around the pipe and around a hook type device. There isn’t any breakthrough anticipated here, nor I do I have any real intent to foster a discussion of what size and type of piping to employ. I am focused on learning some ideas about how to best attach and suspend piping that runs across a ceiling. By “best”, I have in mind ease of the install and subsequent durability.

Many thanks for your inputs!

-- Jim, Houston, TX


16 replies so far

View eflanders's profile

eflanders

326 posts in 2244 days


#1 posted 04-01-2018 05:09 PM

U straps to support the pipe made of pvc and self tapping drywall anchors. The pvc pipe does not weigh much and these anchors are: strong enough, easy to install and inexpensive.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1834 posts in 556 days


#2 posted 04-01-2018 09:10 PM

you are not anchoring to bare drywall – you are anchoring to the rafters that should be every 16-24”.
so 2 inch screws and straps every 4 feet will work just fine (with your choice of strapping).
4” sewer drain PVC pipe is very light weight and will work quite well.
clear sections every few feet would help with visual inspections should you have any flow issues.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View Redoak49's profile

Redoak49

4000 posts in 2382 days


#3 posted 04-01-2018 09:17 PM

This is what I made and used. I heavy duty zip tie secures the pipe to the mount. The mounts were fastened to the ceiling joists with long deck screws.

View HTown's profile

HTown

114 posts in 1580 days


#4 posted 04-01-2018 10:36 PM

I used 2×2’s that I attached to the ceiling and walls. They are screewed to studs/rafters where possible and drywall elsewhere. I pre-drilled them to 1/2” to accept large zip ties that hold the 6” dwvr pipe. If I were to do it again, I would do the same. Let me know if you need more pics.

Good luck.

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

916 posts in 1978 days


#5 posted 04-02-2018 12:26 AM

These are all valuable ideas for me to work with, and I appreciate it a lot.

Using zip ties is a connection method that i had not even thought about. The use of wooden “tracks” to follow the path of the pipe, as suggested by hTown would work for me. The problem for me with just attaching to the ceiling joists is that they aren’t really in all the right places.

I have limited pathway options due to existing light fixture placements, and a some of other ceiling mounted items that would be a bit of a pain to move. I had not given wall anchors too much thought because i was not sure if there would be adequate support. Maybe I can do that in a couple of places, as part of the overall scheme.

Redoak, the brackets you made are so nice, and the underlying concept is really smart. I don’t currently have fixtures in my place that look that good.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View English's profile

English

671 posts in 1871 days


#6 posted 04-02-2018 12:53 AM

I used cradles like these, with 2” screws into the rafters and HVAC grade Plastic ties.
You can get these at the following link.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CTUZA3G/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

-- John, Suffolk Virgina

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

1385 posts in 1210 days


#7 posted 04-02-2018 02:41 AM

Do you really mean rafters or do you mean ceiling joists?

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5548 posts in 2887 days


#8 posted 04-02-2018 10:40 AM


I used 2×2 s that I attached to the ceiling and walls. They are screewed to studs/rafters where possible and drywall elsewhere. I pre-drilled them to 1/2” to accept large zip ties that hold the 6” dwvr pipe. If I were to do it again, I would do the same. Let me know if you need more pics.

Good luck.

- HTown

Almost exactly the same thing I did, I had planned on replacing the duct hangers (really big zip ties) with large hose clamps for added strength, but they are so stout there was no need. The blocks (mine had a 3/4” piece of pine under the 2×4 section) move the pipe off the ceiling slightly to allow a little room for sealing the joints…which is a headache if the pipe is right against the rock.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Bumpy's profile

Bumpy

40 posts in 875 days


#9 posted 04-02-2018 11:01 AM

I found that using a 1” wide wire staple into a stud or joist works great. I drive them in leaving enough room to feed a 18 inch zip tie through.
Works great, I have 2 35 ft runs and drops installed this way.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1834 posts in 556 days


#10 posted 04-02-2018 12:40 PM

wow Fred – that looks awesome !!

Rafter vs Joist ~ is another term often misused.
from google:
A ceiling joist is simply a horizontal framing member that runs between walls or rafters to support a ceiling.
A rafter tie is a horizontal framing member that runs between rafters to resist the outward thrust of the rafters.
A single framing member can, however, function as both a rafter tie and a ceiling joist.

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View jimintx's profile

jimintx

916 posts in 1978 days


#11 posted 04-02-2018 01:29 PM

Fred, that is a great looking system, and portrays the type of thing I want to install. Mine will have only a few branches so will be less complex. I do like your design idea of adding the 3/4” spacers to gain some room to work around the pipe joints.

ALSO, Fred: I interpret your post to be saying that you did some joint sealing after your pipe system was all assembled and suspended. I’d sure like to also learn what method of sealing the joints you used?

English, thank you for showing those hanger clips in post #6. I did not know those were a thing, but now i can see some good uses for them not only to hang a plastic pipe run, but also for attaching or hanging a few other things. I plan to order a package of sure.

.

-- Jim, Houston, TX

View Blindhog's profile

Blindhog

122 posts in 1442 days


#12 posted 04-02-2018 02:41 PM

Jim,
I’ve had my system in place for a little over three years with no problems. Simply used poplar cutoffs from 2” faceframe and screwed directly into the joists with some overrun to provide additional attachments for future use. I’ve hung some pneumatic piping along side as shown.

Regrading sealing the piping, I did not seal the piping as there is no need. If you fully seat the piping into the fittings, you will get a leak-proof seal. Note I used the SDR 35 drain pipe as it is thinner walled and lighter; still plenty strong. I’ve got a 5hp ClearVue system and it works great. This allows future modifications using existing fittings should the need arise. You can easily verify by smoke testing.

Good luck with your install,
Hog

-- Don't let perfection get in the way of plenty good enough

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5548 posts in 2887 days


#13 posted 04-02-2018 04:02 PM

I completely disagree with Hog on no need to seal the system. The current system I have is a CV with the 16” impeller, and I could actually see the motor amps drop after I sealed the joints (to 8.3 amps from 8.6 amps, with all the gates closed. Now it’s true that there may be a little more footage (and joints) than some systems, but sealing is just running a bead of silicone around the joint, doesn’t take long or cost much, and doesn’t make future changes significantly more difficult. This is my third shop with much of the same piping, and I have that result (need to seal the joints) in all three. To check for leaks I used to use a cigar, and while that works it does smell up the place. A little easier is a down feather from a duck or goose. Hold it near the joint or whatever you’re checking and the feather will tell you if it’s sucking air. My piping is a mix of 2729 from the previous system, and I needed to add some more straight in my current shop…I could only find the SR35.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

View Blindhog's profile

Blindhog

122 posts in 1442 days


#14 posted 04-02-2018 04:30 PM

Fred,
Thanks for your insight. I base my comments on my experience and system performance. I’ve had great results not sealing but YMMV.
Please proceed as you deem appropriate.

-- Don't let perfection get in the way of plenty good enough

View Fred Hargis's profile

Fred Hargis

5548 posts in 2887 days


#15 posted 04-02-2018 04:49 PM

I understand, different opinions is what this forum is all about. I should have mentioned that most folks agree with you on not sealing…it’s just not been my experience.

-- Our village hasn't lost it's idiot, he was elected to congress.

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