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planing endgrain cutting board glue ups

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Forum topic by toolie posted 03-31-2018 01:16 PM 2526 views 0 times favorited 25 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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toolie

2155 posts in 2988 days


03-31-2018 01:16 PM

Whats the effect on planer blades when planing endgrain cutting boards when there is glue squeeze out? I’ve been using my drum sander with 80 grit paper and i’m looking for possible alternatives to process cutting board projects faster and better.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.


25 replies so far

View WyattCo's profile

WyattCo

93 posts in 464 days


#1 posted 03-31-2018 01:32 PM

The glue won’t harm the blades. When planing end grain, take very light cuts.

View Rich's profile

Rich

4399 posts in 949 days


#2 posted 03-31-2018 02:06 PM

I doubt if the previous poster has even tried it. I haven’t, never will, and here’s why:

https://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/articles/end-grain-through-the-planer/

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

2637 posts in 1582 days


#3 posted 03-31-2018 02:10 PM

I use 36 grit paper in my sander for those initial passes. It doesn’t clog as easily and really speeds up the initial flattening.

Typically I’ll use a handheld belt sander (60 grit) to knock down the squeeze out so it will sit level on the DS. Dried glue can be quite damaging to steel planer blades.

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1796 posts in 523 days


#4 posted 03-31-2018 02:11 PM

the common paint scraper does a great job of removing excess dried glue
prior to using any motorized finishing machine on it.

Rich – I have never even entertained the thought of running anything with endgrain
through a planer. I have never seen or heard of a project exploding in the planer.
when a person understands the structural issues of endgrain and cutting tools,
it is common sense not do it. sure, people “probably” do it all the time and get away with it.
then – there are others that suffer serious consequences with a damaged project and/or bodily harm.
great reference to the Wood Whisperer ! (this goes hand-in-hand with the riving knife/splitter issues).

.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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Andre

2572 posts in 2166 days


#5 posted 03-31-2018 02:33 PM

I use an old scrapper or a old Stanley 9 1/2 with a PMV-11 iron to knock off excess glue and only hand plane! Have run some end grain over the jointer but would never consider going through the planner!

-- Lifting one end of the plank.

View WyattCo's profile

WyattCo

93 posts in 464 days


#6 posted 03-31-2018 03:42 PM



I doubt if the previous poster has even tried it. I haven t, never will, and here s why:

- Rich

I’m curious as to how you’ve come to this conclusion.

The very first endgrain cutting board I ever made, I ran through the planer. I didn’t know any better and this was about 15 years ago. Due to tear out issues, I posted on a discussion board I was on asking for advice on minimizing the tear out. Some of the members started warning me about running endgrain cutting boards through a planer. Some said they did it regularly but took very minute passes. Despite the warnings, I’ve always done it but I do understand the dangers. I just follow extended safety rules. I’m on my second set of planer blades in 6 years.

View sras's profile

sras

5061 posts in 3489 days


#7 posted 03-31-2018 04:03 PM

I have also used a planer to level end grain boards, but I have transitioned to using a router sled and thickness sander. While the planer worked, I feel better using the setup I have now. For me, “light passes” with the planer means .002” at a time.

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1796 posts in 523 days


#8 posted 03-31-2018 04:05 PM

fthis – like I stated: people “probably” do it all the time and get away with it.
then – there are others that suffer serious consequences with a damaged project and/or bodily harm.

so far – you are one of the fortunate ones that have been lucky….. hope your luck holds out.
just because you do it – does not make it any safer for others to try it.
IMHO, to give potentially dangerous information and guidance is just being totally irresponsible.
I am with Rich: Never tried it – Never will.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

View Rich's profile

Rich

4399 posts in 949 days


#9 posted 03-31-2018 04:09 PM


fthis – like I stated: people “probably” do it all the time and get away with it.
then – there are others that suffer serious consequences with a damaged project and/or bodily harm.

- John Smith

There are people in the world who have never lost a round of Russian roulette too. All it takes is one.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View LesB's profile

LesB

2075 posts in 3803 days


#10 posted 03-31-2018 04:35 PM

I have to agree with John Smith on the potential for problems. I have never tried it. I use a belt sander with 60 grit then a drum sander starting with 80 grit to get the end grain flattened out. Finishing with an orbital hand sander.

That said it makes me wonder if the newer spiral cutter heads with multiple carbide inserts would work. Theoretically at any one point in time it is only making about a 1/2” cut. I have a 15” Powermatic with the continuous spiral blade which also is not taking a full width cut at any one instant and is in a slicing action which should be similar…..but I’m still not willing to risk damaging a set of $90 blades to try it on end grain cutting.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Woodmaster1's profile

Woodmaster1

1167 posts in 2947 days


#11 posted 03-31-2018 04:41 PM

Planing end grain usually ends in disaster. I use a drum sander with 80grit. I have access to one at my woodworking club as well as my own.

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

3468 posts in 2217 days


#12 posted 03-31-2018 07:54 PM

I’ve done a couple hundred end grain cutting boards through the planer never had a issue. But I always glue two boards to the sides and one on the back long grain ways. To stop the end grain from wanting to crack out not to mention that you can make the the long grain pieces taller and longer then cutting board to cut out snipe and for flattening the board. I hate sanding and rarely sand anything I prefer to hand plane finish.

View Kelly's profile

Kelly

2280 posts in 3304 days


#13 posted 03-31-2018 08:28 PM

A couple thoughts come to mind:

1) Go to the casino, the pay back on your gamble will be less threatening to you and your equipment; and,

2) If you have to work that hard to avoid a problem or disaster, why do it?

View toolie's profile

toolie

2155 posts in 2988 days


#14 posted 03-31-2018 08:49 PM

That’s a curious blend of opinions. I also thought it would not be a terribly good idea, except that the guy at MTMwood does it all the time. And he does nothing BUT end grain cutting boards.

https://"mtmwood.com/en/mtmwood.php

I like the idea of using a belt sander to knock down the really egregious squeeze out. i think ill give that a try with the next board and stick with the drum sander.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

View diverlloyd's profile

diverlloyd

3468 posts in 2217 days


#15 posted 03-31-2018 09:27 PM



A couple thoughts come to mind:

1) Go to the casino, the pay back on your gamble will be less threatening to you and your equipment; and,

2) If you have to work that hard to avoid a problem or disaster, why do it?

- Kelly


1) I worked at a casino and it’s actually really sad to see what it does to people. How much they lose because of being addicted to gambling. Family,friends,money,houses, cars and their mental and physical health. As for the machinery I haven’t had to change blades or anything on either of my planers due to putting end grain through them.

2) I don’t understand how it’s so much more work. You are already cutting pieces to height and doing a glue up so a extra 5 minutes max. How long does it take to sand by hand or level one with a router sled twenty to thirty minutes or more. Not including the time to set up the router and get the board in place. Saving a minimum of 20 minutes per board per side over just a hundred boards has saved me 66 2/3 hours making each board that much more profitable in the long run. About $3332 for 100 boards at charging $50 per man hour and not including being able to use that time to make more products and or boards to donate to charity( all of mine go to charity or as gifts minus about 20) and offset your taxes.

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