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Forum topic by Charles55 posted 03-29-2018 05:01 PM 1115 views 0 times favorited 11 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Charles55

5 posts in 481 days


03-29-2018 05:01 PM

Topic tags/keywords: table saw blade wobble

Hey, I recently bought a ridgid table saw from Home Depot and got a 60 tooth diablo blade for it as well. When I turn on the saw the blade seems to wobble for about a second before it straightens out. My cuts are fine. The saw is still under the 90 day warranty so should I return it for another or is it something I shouldn’t worry about?
Thanks


11 replies so far

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5576 posts in 3666 days


#1 posted 03-29-2018 05:11 PM

That “wobble” is probably an optical illusion. I notice the same thing on my saw blades, but they cut as they should. I wouldn’t worry about it.

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11638 posts in 3851 days


#2 posted 03-29-2018 05:40 PM

Typical of lesser quality blades like the red ones.
I wouldn’t be to concerned if it eventually cuts true. The test is to make a cut part way through a board and compare the width of the kerf to the blades advertised kerf width or, mike a couple teeth.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View mel52's profile (online now)

mel52

868 posts in 687 days


#3 posted 03-29-2018 06:07 PM

I am with MrRon on the optical Illusion. After reading this while in my shop, I decided to check my different blades as I have never paid that much attention at the start-up. One really cheap blade, one so called, 80 dollar lesser quality blade, which is as good as most, and a high quality 165 dollar one. They all had this weird look to them at start-up which is a trick to the eye ( possible optical illusion ), they all cut well and the kerf measured the same as the blade. All of these blades were the thin kerf. Just my opinion.

-- MEL, Kansas

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

5457 posts in 2774 days


#4 posted 03-29-2018 06:35 PM

My cuts are fine.

That is all you need to worry about, it is working as designed.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View Charles55's profile

Charles55

5 posts in 481 days


#5 posted 03-29-2018 08:17 PM

Thanks for the input guys. I checked the blade with a combination square in the miter slot which revealed there was a slight bit of wobble; the ruler would bearly scrape one side and clear the other while turning the blade. I also checked the kerf vs the advertised kerf with a micrometer and it was slightly larger as well. I can be a perfectionist and maybe need to spend a little more money for the precision I’m looking for.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

3053 posts in 2448 days


#6 posted 03-29-2018 10:13 PM

I’m embarrassed to say I used to have a Craftsman job site saw that showed a lot of wobble on start up. When the blade got up to speed, the wobble was no longer visible.

As soon as the wood contacted the blade, causing the blade to slow down, the wobble came back. Made rough, inaccurate cuts. Need I say the saw was a piece of crap? I also hated the whine of the universal motor, bad bearings, and noisy gears.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View CaptainKlutz's profile

CaptainKlutz

1509 posts in 1917 days


#7 posted 03-29-2018 11:51 PM

Hmm…
Could be blade at start up, sounds normal;
but did you check saw without blade?
Take blade off saw, run it without blade and watch the arbor.
Does the arbor move excessively?
With saw unplugged, do you feel any movement in arbor?
Does the arbor flange have any run out?
FWIW –
When a belt driven saw starts, the motor exerts massive amount of force into system. It takes a few seconds to reach equilibrium, and things shake a little. Even a large heavy cabinet saw has some additional vibration and shaking of pulleys during start up. The pulley movement projects into the arbor and over time contributes to bearing wear. If something is bent, or blade has excess wobble due out of round condition, this wears bearings faster.
That is why arbor bearings need to be checked and serviced occasionally.

If your arbor bearings have ANY play, they should be replaced. (<$30 and bearing puller)
If you find excessive run out on arbor flange, this needs to be addressed as well. (flat stone)
How to do both of these are posted elsewhere in forums.

Best Luck.

-- I'm an engineer not a woodworker, but I can randomly find useful tools and furniture inside a pile of lumber!

View Gene Howe's profile

Gene Howe

11638 posts in 3851 days


#8 posted 03-31-2018 12:45 PM



Thanks for the input guys. I checked the blade with a combination square in the miter slot which revealed there was a slight bit of wobble; the ruler would bearly scrape one side and clear the other while turning the blade. I also checked the kerf vs the advertised kerf with a micrometer and it was slightly larger as well. I can be a perfectionist and maybe need to spend a little more money for the precision I m looking for.

- Charles55


As suggested, you might check the arbor run out first. Then look for better blades. I’ve found TENRYU to offer the best performance and length of service. They are a bit more expensive than the Diablo but, you get what you pay for. In woodworking, as in the rest of life, There ain’t no such thing as a free lunch.

-- Gene 'The true soldier fights not because he hates what is in front of him, but because he loves what is behind him.' G. K. Chesterton

View MrRon's profile

MrRon

5576 posts in 3666 days


#9 posted 04-01-2018 03:21 PM



Hmm…
Could be blade at start up, sounds normal;
but did you check saw without blade?
Take blade off saw, run it without blade and watch the arbor.
Does the arbor move excessively?
With saw unplugged, do you feel any movement in arbor?
Does the arbor flange have any run out?
FWIW –
When a belt driven saw starts, the motor exerts massive amount of force into system. It takes a few seconds to reach equilibrium, and things shake a little. Even a large heavy cabinet saw has some additional vibration and shaking of pulleys during start up. The pulley movement projects into the arbor and over time contributes to bearing wear. If something is bent, or blade has excess wobble due out of round condition, this wears bearings faster.
That is why arbor bearings need to be checked and serviced occasionally.

If your arbor bearings have ANY play, they should be replaced. (<$30 and bearing puller)
If you find excessive run out on arbor flange, this needs to be addressed as well. (flat stone)
How to do both of these are posted elsewhere in forums.

Best Luck.

- CaptainKlutz


A good reason to make sure the belt (s) are tensioned correctly. Uneven belt tension can cause uneven arbor running. This is the reason for matched sets of belts for 3 belt machines. The newer single belt machines should prove to be smoother running.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4070 days


#10 posted 04-01-2018 07:44 PM

You can face grind the arbor flange under power
using a stone. Mathias Wandel made a video about
doing it.

Blade stabilizers can help too. If your saw plate
is out of flat services like Forrest can flatten
and tension it properly. Sometimes you may get
lucky and find a cheap blade that turned real
flat just by luck. A LJ said he got great results
from a Harbor Freight blade but I’d guess he
just lucked out and got a good one. If you can
look at them in a store they can be checked with
a straight edge.

View Jimintomahawak's profile

Jimintomahawak

73 posts in 898 days


#11 posted 04-02-2018 12:47 AM

http://lumberjocks.com/topics/215602
This is what I did

-- Laziness drives creative thinking...

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