LumberJocks

Drying "cookies"

  • Advertise with us

« back to Woodworking Skill Share forum

Forum topic by futbalfantic posted 03-28-2018 09:45 PM 895 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
View futbalfantic's profile

futbalfantic

3 posts in 480 days


03-28-2018 09:45 PM

I am fairly new to woodworking and even then its not a full time hobby nor does it even come close to counting as ‘fine wood working.’ I have been tasked to make center pieces for tables at a wedding. The center pieces are to be cut out of a log at ~1.5in thick and are going to be 10-14in round with the bark left intact.

So to the dilemma: This needs to be done in 6 weeks. I plan on cutting the trees this weekend but need to dry them to stain and finish them. I plan to build a dehumidified kiln to speed this process up.

Is this feasible? What do I need to do to make this successful?

I know this subject has been covered time and time again but I found nothing covering this topic nor do I know even how to begin searching for it.

TIA
Futbal


15 replies so far

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4068 days


#1 posted 03-28-2018 09:54 PM

ugh.

Are you set up to cut these on a band saw?

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2273 posts in 3059 days


#2 posted 03-28-2018 10:01 PM

The cookies will always crack.

-Paul

View futbalfantic's profile

futbalfantic

3 posts in 480 days


#3 posted 03-28-2018 10:10 PM

I am not sure if I explained what I’m planning/wanting to do but if you look down on a stump, that is what I want, with a thickness of 1.5in or so. No sure where a band saw comes in with this? :confused:

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 4068 days


#4 posted 03-28-2018 10:17 PM

Go out and have a crack at cutting a few
with a chain saw.

I’m pessimistic because I’ve had chain saws
turn in the kerf when crosscutting logs,
but give it a try and if you get the results
you want with the cuts, then figure out how
to dry them.

Cutting them by hand would be more controllable
but take all day. The bars and teeth on chain
saws tend to wear unevenly so the saw is
inclined to twist. It doesn’t matter in bucking
firewood but for making finish cuts it can
be a problem.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2273 posts in 3059 days


#5 posted 03-28-2018 10:53 PM

... more on cracking.

To explain… Wook generally shrinks more in the tangential direction than the radial direction.

For Black Walnut, for example, the Wood Database says the Radial shrink is 5.5% and tangential shrink is 7.8%, so T/R ratio is 1.4.

So, as the wood dries, something happens.

Let’s assume the radius of the green log is 4 inches. The circumference will be 4 x pi inches (12.566 inches).

After drying, the radius will be reduced by 5.5% and the circumference would be reduced by 7.8% .. but it can’t be, so something has to give. The radius of the dried disk would be 3.78 inches, which for a full circle would give a 3.78 x pi circumference – that is 11.875”, but he wood will shrink tangentially, by 7.8% so 4x(1-0.078)xpi = 11.58 inches, so a pie-shaped gap of 11.875 – 11.58” = 0.288 inches would open. Roughly about a 1/4” gap at the rim.

If that’s ok with you, then go for it!

There may be some woods where the T/R ratio is closer to 1.0 and for sure there are some where it is much higher than 1.4, so the size of the gap will depend on that number, which you can check on wood-database.com

This is the list of woods with T/R ratio between 1.0 and 1.1.

-Paul

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2321 posts in 2219 days


#6 posted 03-28-2018 11:51 PM

I also think it’s a doomed project. Not only will it crack like Paul calculated, it will warp badly like a potato chip.
I could do the math to show I’m right but you probably wouldn’t understand it very complicated.:)

-- Aj

View LesB's profile

LesB

2129 posts in 3864 days


#7 posted 03-29-2018 12:59 AM

Possible ways to deal with this. First I would cut the rounds thicker than the 1.5” you want for the end product. Maybe about 4”, and recut them after they are dry.
At 10 to 14” they will fit in a microwave oven and you can try drying them that way using a brown paper bag method. I won’t go into the whole procedure here but there is info on the internet about microwave drying (mostly for wood turners). The process works on the order of a steam kiln. I do agree with the others that you will have some cracking and warping problems no matter how you do it.

-- Les B, Oregon

View futbalfantic's profile

futbalfantic

3 posts in 480 days


#8 posted 03-29-2018 03:32 AM

Apparently this is a highly popular thing. People out there are letting them dry for just a few days then shellac-ing them with other drilling out the center and filling it with wood filler.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2273 posts in 3059 days


#9 posted 03-29-2018 04:45 PM



... [...] Wook generally shrinks [...]

err… I meant “Wood”.

-Paul

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2273 posts in 3059 days


#10 posted 03-29-2018 04:47 PM

Yeah, I was thinking if it is only a centerpiece for one dinner, you could cut them the day before and keep them soaking in water until deployed on the table. It won’t matter if they crack later.

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

495 posts in 2991 days


#11 posted 03-29-2018 06:47 PM



I am not sure if I explained what I m planning/wanting to do but if you look down on a stump, that is what I want, with a thickness of 1.5in or so. No sure where a band saw comes in with this? :confused:

- futbalfantic


How are you planning to cut them? Band saw would be the most logical tool for the job.

View Notbrick's profile

Notbrick

42 posts in 530 days


#12 posted 03-29-2018 07:26 PM

Honestly, let them crack. Everyone is going ‘rustic’ these days. Adds character to a centerpiece.

Ask to see what other decorations are going to be placed. It could all work out.

View LesB's profile

LesB

2129 posts in 3864 days


#13 posted 03-30-2018 04:57 PM

Another solution came to me, sort of in the middle of the night thing. You could treat the slices with PEG, polyethylene glycol. That would stabilize the wood and should keep the bark on. Here is one source with some info on how to use it.
http://www.rockler.com/polyethylene-glycol-peg-green-wood-stabilizer

-- Les B, Oregon

View Aj2's profile

Aj2

2321 posts in 2219 days


#14 posted 03-30-2018 07:17 PM

Cutting rounds on a bandsaw comes with HIGH RISK SO BECAREFUL.The blade will pull the roundness forward very quickly and with a lot of force. The blade will be trashed if this happens.
It can be done safely with a good fixture.

-- Aj

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2273 posts in 3059 days


#15 posted 04-02-2018 07:56 PM

^+1

You need to nail, clamp or screw a flat board onto the log in such a way as to prevent the log from rolling into the blade. I can’t explain quickly. I’ve never done it. There is a LJ who hurt himself badly trying to slice a log on a bandsaw.


Cutting rounds on a bandsaw comes with HIGH RISK SO BECAREFUL.The blade will pull the roundness forward very quickly and with a lot of force. The blade will be trashed if this happens.
It can be done safely with a good fixture.

- Aj2


Have your say...

You must be signed in to reply.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com