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Need to fix a color after Poly :(

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Forum topic by Kitui4u posted 03-28-2018 02:54 PM 784 views 0 times favorited 15 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Kitui4u

3 posts in 480 days


03-28-2018 02:54 PM

Topic tags/keywords: question color correction dye

Hello, I made drawers (right) with BB ply and a cabinet with Birch ply (left). They are knew walls cabs to be precise. I followed the same process to white wash and the GF sanding sealer and 3 coats of GF HP Water based Poly Flat. However the Birch Ply looks very pink (left) compared to the BB drawers (right) and I want to correct the color. I bought Trans green die to correct but I have no idea what to do, ratio, etc. Could somebody please help me? Btw, the holes are aligned, not sure why they look like that in the picture.

-- Kitui4u


15 replies so far

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therealSteveN

3103 posts in 994 days


#1 posted 03-30-2018 06:36 PM

Ouch….... Both seem like Birch, but way different branches of that tree, the “birch” ply is likely an oriental tree of some sort, called Birch. Baltic Birch is a pretty specific tree found in a pretty specific area. I would imagine some colorant differences in absorption, and you are seeing how that affects the outcome.

This product is the only one I have ever seen that the top line of info for it says to help color match on a poly sealed project. That said I have never used it, so I’m not certain I have high hopes beyond remaking the fronts, or trying a harsh stripper and a do-over attempt.

Jeesh, not to beat a dead tree, but always test a finish on some scrap, in your case 2 pieces of scrap. I hate these kind of posts, it’s not like everyine hasn’t been there at some point. Learning from mistakes is painful.

Best of Luck.

-- Think safe, be safe

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therealSteveN

3103 posts in 994 days


#2 posted 03-30-2018 06:41 PM

Ohh forgot to post the information for using that poly shades stuff

Just what I know, of you are doing something like changing, darkening a color sometimes if you don’t get hung up on one of the two choices, but instead can live with what both can make, you will end with a more satisfying ending. IOW something of a color change for both.

Ohhh, and now is an excellent time to practice on some scrap of BOTH woods. Start by getting the scrap to where the finished pieces are, go forward from that point to see how to best make a save, or as we loosely call that a “design change”

I’ll have to read along. Years doing this, and I sometimes find myself learning new info.

-- Think safe, be safe

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therealSteveN

3103 posts in 994 days


#3 posted 03-30-2018 06:47 PM

Ya know, the more I look at the pics. I’d just remake the doors with BB ply. In the end a lot less fooling around, and it will likely offer the best possible color match, not to mention grain matching.

Or the real deal cure for a bad finish. PAINT!!!!

-- Think safe, be safe

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Kitui4u

3 posts in 480 days


#4 posted 03-30-2018 07:35 PM

Yes, I will eventually paint them the color of something else in the room. They are inset with Euro Hinges that I drill and assembly to the frame on a table. The opening is 50×40”...so a lot of work top rebuild them. They would also be too heavy in BB. Somebody in another forum told me to buy the dye and mix it with the original paint mix but he did not give me enough details to really do the recipe. :) thanks anyway

-- Kitui4u

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ArtMann

1398 posts in 1236 days


#5 posted 03-31-2018 02:42 PM

Baltic Birch plywood is imported from Eastern European (Baltic) countries such as Russia. Birch plywood from home centers is made from American Birch trees. The two species are not closely related. I recommend a dark stain or paint that obscures this difference.

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Kitui4u

3 posts in 480 days


#6 posted 05-11-2018 07:47 PM

My wood is not purchased from home center. The main drawer build was done with Baltic B. The doors you see was Baltic Plywoid. I went to the wood shop with a sample but the light was very deceiving. I will color the doors to match the pillows at some point. Thanks

-- Kitui4u

View Sark's profile

Sark

136 posts in 781 days


#7 posted 05-13-2018 03:23 PM

There is no way you are going to get the pink doors look like the white drawer fronts without rebuilding. But if that is not an option you can probably get both to match reasonably well if you pick a dark stain color. And if much darker is not an option, well then you are out of luck.

If you want the Baltic birch to go pinker, then you can probably get a pretty close match using TransTint dyes.

I ran a cabinet shop for 10 years and we did all our own finishing. My experience putting a green toner coat over another coat to take our some of the red was not that successful, though I have done it many times, usually out of desperation. You can easily end up with some hideous look and wished you had bit the bullet earlier. It works if the colors are close in color, but in this case they are not that close.

The wavy mostly horizontal grain on the doors doesn’t look quite right either. Normally we expect grain on doors to be vertical and horizontal on the drawer fronts. Just another reason to consider redoing.

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Rich

4565 posts in 1010 days


#8 posted 05-13-2018 04:43 PM

Like Sark said, green isn’t going to help the situation. If you blend green dye into one that’s too red for your liking, it will mute the red towards brown, but if you apply green dye to a surface, you still have green since there’s nothing for it to blend with.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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000

2859 posts in 1319 days


#9 posted 05-13-2018 05:22 PM

No mention of bleech?
That would bring them closer, don’t know if it would lighten it enough to match though.

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Rich

4565 posts in 1010 days


#10 posted 05-13-2018 05:32 PM


No mention of bleech?
That would bring them closer, don t know if it would lighten it enough to match though.

- jbay

That’s a good idea. Definitely worth a try. Sand first of course to get down to the bare wood. I like to use the pouches of chlorine powder for swimming pools because you can mix it at a really high concentration and get better results than a bottle of Clorox (and I always have a box of pouches out by the pool).

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

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000

2859 posts in 1319 days


#11 posted 05-13-2018 05:43 PM


No mention of bleech?
That would bring them closer, don t know if it would lighten it enough to match though.

- jbay

That s a good idea. Definitely worth a try. Sand first of course to get down to the bare wood. I like to use the pouches of chlorine powder for swimming pools because you can mix it at a really high concentration and get better results than a bottle of Clorox (and I always have a box of pouches out by the pool).

- Rich

Ahh,
I originally read this a while back, should have re-read. didn’t realize finish had been applied.

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Rich

4565 posts in 1010 days


#12 posted 05-13-2018 05:57 PM


Ahh,
I originally read this a while back, should have re-read. didn t realize finish had been applied.

- jbay

I still think your bleach idea is a good one. Seems like the best chance to get similar color on both to work from.

-- Knowledge is not skill. Knowledge plus ten thousand times is skill. -- Shinichi Suzuki

View Sark's profile

Sark

136 posts in 781 days


#13 posted 05-13-2018 08:12 PM

Since finish already was applied, bleaching is out of the question, unless you totally strip the existing finish. Since the plywood veneer is quite thin, sanding the finish off is nearly impossible without going into the veneer. So have to use some stripper. Then get perfectly clean so absolutely no residue is left behind, and then sand with fine grit (400) sandpaper. Then bleach. And bleaching has its own challenges (I’ve ruined a few pieces with bleach). Then finish. And…

It would be a lot easier to replace the wood.

View DS's profile

DS

3197 posts in 2841 days


#14 posted 05-14-2018 03:19 PM

Just FYI for the next project. White Birch will match BB better. What you have on the left is Red Birch.
My local Hardwood vendor carries all three species. Red, White and Baltic Birch.

Worst case, you can remake the two door panels in Baltic or White Birch rather than risk an “iffy” fix in the finish.

-- "Hard work is not defined by the difficulty of the task as much as a person's desire to perform it.", DS251

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the_other_ken

38 posts in 3396 days


#15 posted 05-14-2018 04:05 PM

What you are talking about is called “toning”. You need to have the capability to spray your finish, you can’t really do it with a brush or wipe on finish. It is also quite a talent to get the toning on the wood evenly. I’m still working on that.

I would take a piece of the birch and put the original finish on it. Then take about 8 ounces of the finish, add one drop of the green dye into it and mix it up good. Some find it easier to add the dye to a little water first, then mix that into the finish. Close down the sprayer to it sprays a very fine coat and go lightly over the finish. Ideally this should be so light that you don’t really see any change. Do about 3-4 light “dustings” of the toner until the pink is muted. Then put one more coat of the original untoned finish on.

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