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Lumber prices skyrocketing up

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Forum topic by eflanders posted 03-28-2018 01:18 PM 1361 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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eflanders

326 posts in 2270 days


03-28-2018 01:18 PM

Topic tags/keywords: prices lumber cost availability oak cedar cherry maple pine walnut ash

Warning this is a rant…
Please tell me that this is just a local issues but all rough lumber prices around here are going through the roof. I have always tried to buy rough sawn timber to save costs and there are plenty of folks in my neck of the woods with sawmills. So getting lumber has not been much of an issues unless for some reason the cutters were unable to harvest a certain species. That was the case for what most folks here call white cedar. The past 3 winters they had a tough time cutting cedar but this winter they could and there was plenty of it available. But the price has gone up 3 times the price accordingly! I can buy oak for the same price or even lower than cedar now! Are you folks seeing similar issues?


19 replies so far

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d38

126 posts in 682 days


#1 posted 03-28-2018 02:55 PM

I had 545 BF of S3S quarter sawn red oak delivered yesterday. Total with tax, $20 for delivery, it equaled $6/BF. Last fall when I talked to the same company, I was told $5.50 (before tax and delivery). So it went up a bit, but not a huge amount.
Triple the price is hard to swallow.

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avsmusic1

442 posts in 1104 days


#2 posted 03-28-2018 03:26 PM

Ive seen what I suspect most everyone is seeing- crazy spikes for walnut and for anything live edge. The live edge is the irritating one for me as it’s effectively less work for the mill but, supply and demand being what if is, I have come to terms with it.

I will say that the delta between retail lumber shops and the local tree guy w/ a mill seems to be closing though. A few yrs ago the local guy was probably 25% of the retail- now it’s more like 60-75% on anything worth buying

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AlaskaGuy

5316 posts in 2728 days


#3 posted 03-28-2018 05:02 PM

What isn’t going up?

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

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splintergroup

2728 posts in 1642 days


#4 posted 03-28-2018 05:05 PM

Locally oak has gone up a bit, walnut has soared, alder has soared, cherry has slightly fallen, maple has gone up a tad, and poplar has remained steady.

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BHZ

22 posts in 1398 days


#5 posted 03-28-2018 05:09 PM

Salesman at the local hardwood place said that the Chinese are buying up all the Walnut they can get.

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1452 posts in 1643 days


#6 posted 03-28-2018 05:16 PM



Ive seen what I suspect most everyone is seeing- crazy spikes for walnut and for anything live edge. The live edge is the irritating one for me as it’s effectively less work for the mill but, supply and demand being what if is, I have come to terms with it.

I will say that the delta between retail lumber shops and the local tree guy w/ a mill seems to be closing though. A few yrs ago the local guy was probably 25% of the retail- now it’s more like 60-75% on anything worth buying

- avsmusic1

Even though you may think that live edge should be cheaper, it actually makes for more overhead costs.
Normally, you make a few cuts and you have a square cant and then cut the boards. Cutting live edge means cutting through the bark each and every time and that causes excessive blade wear. The blade has to cut through embedded sand and other trash that has built up in the bark over the life of the tree. If I had the choice, i would cut boards but cutting live edge, which I actually do enjoy using for project can have me changing a blade after a single log sometimes.

While, that won’t triple the price, it doesn’t make it any cheaper to cut.

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MrRon

5571 posts in 3663 days


#7 posted 03-28-2018 05:16 PM

I think it’s just a question of supply and demand. When there is a demand, prices go up; a surplus drives down the price. Tariffs imposed on China may also drive up prices of domestic goods. Another factor I see is that when the public sees an increase in their paycheck due to lowered taxes, providers of goods and services raise their prices to capture this increase in consumer spending.

View gargey's profile

gargey

1013 posts in 1195 days


#8 posted 03-28-2018 05:23 PM

Has anyone started any walnut plantations yet?

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

2271 posts in 3058 days


#9 posted 03-28-2018 06:00 PM

The other thing with live edge is, at least with cherry, higher losses during drying. The sap wood shrinks more than the heart wood and causes thin boards to cup and thick boards to split. I believe the yield is reduced by cutting and drying live edge.

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Ocelot

2271 posts in 3058 days


#10 posted 03-28-2018 06:04 PM

The trouble with farming timber is patience. If you have to commit the land for, say 80 years, and you are in your 40’s, then your great-grandchild can sell the timber if nobody in the next 80 years has an impulse to sell the land to pay for a surgery, or buy a BMW or a big boat or a bigger house..


Has anyone started any walnut plantations yet?

- gargey


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gargey

1013 posts in 1195 days


#11 posted 03-28-2018 07:34 PM

You’ve never heard of MiracleGro I guess.

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avsmusic1

442 posts in 1104 days


#12 posted 03-28-2018 07:54 PM


Ive seen what I suspect most everyone is seeing- crazy spikes for walnut and for anything live edge. The live edge is the irritating one for me as it’s effectively less work for the mill but, supply and demand being what if is, I have come to terms with it.

I will say that the delta between retail lumber shops and the local tree guy w/ a mill seems to be closing though. A few yrs ago the local guy was probably 25% of the retail- now it’s more like 60-75% on anything worth buying

- avsmusic1

Even though you may think that live edge should be cheaper, it actually makes for more overhead costs.
Normally, you make a few cuts and you have a square cant and then cut the boards. Cutting live edge means cutting through the bark each and every time and that causes excessive blade wear. The blade has to cut through embedded sand and other trash that has built up in the bark over the life of the tree. If I had the choice, i would cut boards but cutting live edge, which I actually do enjoy using for project can have me changing a blade after a single log sometimes.

While, that won t triple the price, it doesn t make it any cheaper to cut.

- AZWoody


This is an interesting point I hadn’t considered – blade longevity. So it’s easier/faster to cut but not necessarily cheaper on the whole. Thanks

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UncleBuck

251 posts in 500 days


#13 posted 03-28-2018 08:30 PM

in my case i get the logs and unless requested just slab the log and kiln dry, i try to mill it over sized in case of twists, still new at the kiln thing but i have not been able to sell anything if i cut 4/4 they want 8/4 and so on. i have regular walnut live edge slabs with no figure on Facebook for 6.00 bf higher for figured that in Iowa. maybe im to high. some of the slabs on ebay are crazy high.

-- Terry Uncle Buck Carvins "woodworking minus patience equals firewood "

View AZWoody's profile

AZWoody

1452 posts in 1643 days


#14 posted 03-28-2018 08:48 PM


Ive seen what I suspect most everyone is seeing- crazy spikes for walnut and for anything live edge. The live edge is the irritating one for me as it’s effectively less work for the mill but, supply and demand being what if is, I have come to terms with it.

I will say that the delta between retail lumber shops and the local tree guy w/ a mill seems to be closing though. A few yrs ago the local guy was probably 25% of the retail- now it’s more like 60-75% on anything worth buying

- avsmusic1

Even though you may think that live edge should be cheaper, it actually makes for more overhead costs.
Normally, you make a few cuts and you have a square cant and then cut the boards. Cutting live edge means cutting through the bark each and every time and that causes excessive blade wear. The blade has to cut through embedded sand and other trash that has built up in the bark over the life of the tree. If I had the choice, i would cut boards but cutting live edge, which I actually do enjoy using for project can have me changing a blade after a single log sometimes.

While, that won t triple the price, it doesn t make it any cheaper to cut.

- AZWoody

This is an interesting point I hadn t considered – blade longevity. So it s easier/faster to cut but not necessarily cheaper on the whole. Thanks

- avsmusic1

No problem.

After cutting some wood this morning I also came up with a few other things….Beetles and other bugs that live in the bark and sapwood. Those dang things can cause a lot of problems in air dried slabs. Holes and other stuff. Plus, as was said a few posts above, there is so much more loss from warped wood because you cut the boards, pith and all. There really is a lot of waste. Some woods are better than others but my lumber stacks are topped with large 275 gallon totes filled with water and 30 gallon barrels to try to keep the boards from warping and it still doesn’t work sometimes. It’s very frustrating.

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Sleepinginatree

13 posts in 911 days


#15 posted 03-28-2018 09:31 PM

I just sold 12 slabs kiln dried and most of them S2S at a woodworking type show the short 4’ ones went for 75$ and the longer 8’ ones went for 175-200$ mostly walnut one 8’ cherry.They were no less then 2’’ thick and most were 2.5’’ thick and the shorter walnut were all crotches !! All the longer ones were no less then 20’’ across and the short ones were wide 36 inches plus

We are located in Maryland !!

Curly Maple 7$ Bdft kiln dried S3S
I have red oak 3.50 $ BDFT kiln dried S3S
Qsawn sycamore 5.50$ Bdft kiln Dried S3S
Qsawn White Oak 6.50 Bdft Kiln Dried
White Oak 5.0$ Bdft Kiln Dried
Walnut on stickers ready in 2 months 7.0 $ BDFT can be S3S
Cherry is tough right now ! I have maybe 75-100 bdft Kiln dried 6$ Bdft- More coming

showing 1 through 15 of 19 replies

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