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Salt???

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Forum topic by jerkylips posted 03-27-2018 09:03 PM 799 views 0 times favorited 17 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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jerkylips

495 posts in 2991 days


03-27-2018 09:03 PM

I was watching a youtube video this morning about an easy way to align boards for a glue up. In the process of explaining his method, this guy casually said, “and a lot of people will sprinkle salt on the wet glue, to hold the wood in place”.

Huh? Anyone ever hear of this? I hadn’t.

His explanation was that the salt acts as an abrasive, but as the boards are clamped it ends up getting pushed into the fibers of the wood and/or dissolves in the glue. It seems to me that anything you “sprinkle on” your glue up will only weaken the glue joint. BUT, I’ve been known to be wrong before.. Once, I think – probably back in ‘76.


17 replies so far

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jerkylips

495 posts in 2991 days


#1 posted 03-27-2018 09:04 PM

Thought it might make sense to go back & find the vid, so here it is -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il5vFKGv3Uc&t=21s

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LucasWoods

448 posts in 1754 days


#2 posted 03-27-2018 09:16 PM

I have heard someone say this before. Never have done it or tested this theory.

-- Colorado Springs, CO - USAF

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Ripper70

1291 posts in 1329 days


#3 posted 03-27-2018 09:18 PM



BUT, I ve been known to be wrong before.. Once, I think – probably back in 76.

- jerkylips

Wrong. It was ‘75.

I’ve seen this salt method used but never tried it. Supposed to prevent the slipping of the boards during glue ups. If used sparingly, it’s not supposed to affect the bond but I find that if I have a plan for the glue up, and do a dry run to make sure I know what needs to be done in advance, I can skip the salt trick.

-- "You know, I'm such a great driver, it's incomprehensible that they took my license away." --Vince Ricardo

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WyattCo

93 posts in 525 days


#4 posted 03-27-2018 09:38 PM

I’ve tried it numerous times. The salt does NOT readily dissolve in the glue. If I were glueing up soft wood like pine, it did great because the granuals compressed into the wood when clamping. It created “teeth” to prevent slipping. Any hardwoods I tried, the glue up didn’t slip but I could pop apart the work with my hands after full cure. The granuals still remained (most of them) and created nothing but problems.

I’ve tried the “salt trick” with TB Original, TBII, TBIII, and Gorilla wood glue. Nothing dissolves the salt.

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splintergroup

2730 posts in 1643 days


#5 posted 03-27-2018 09:39 PM

I use it from time to time, it does keep the parts from slipping around while clamping. It doesn’t take much.

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MKH

53 posts in 547 days


#6 posted 03-27-2018 09:59 PM

Well, we use biscuits for alignment so I supposed using salt and other food makes some sense.

-- Marshall --------------------------- In with 10. Out with 10.

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Loren

10477 posts in 4068 days


#7 posted 03-27-2018 10:24 PM



I ve tried it numerous times. The salt does NOT readily dissolve in the glue. If I were glueing up soft wood like pine, it did great because the granuals compressed into the wood when clamping. It created “teeth” to prevent slipping. Any hardwoods I tried, the glue up didn t slip but I could pop apart the work with my hands after full cure. The granuals still remained (most of them) and created nothing but problems.

I ve tried the “salt trick” with TB Original, TBII, TBIII, and Gorilla wood glue. Nothing dissolves the salt.

- Fthis

Good to know. I haven’t tried it yet either. I have
a Plano press now that makes flat glue-ups. I’ve
used wire nails with the heads clipped off before
and that works to prevent slippage as the clamps
are tightened. It’s more hassle than salt but if what
you say of hardwoods is true it may be the superior
approach compared to salt.

I had assumed the salt crystals would dissolve in
the PVA glue like salt does in water but now I see
how that could be a flawed assumption.

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Kazooman

1326 posts in 2373 days


#8 posted 03-27-2018 10:56 PM



Well, we use biscuits for alignment so I supposed using salt and other food makes some sense.

- MKH

Absolutely! I have been using butter on my sliding dovetails for ages. Works like a charm.

On the other hand, milk paint has been around for ages and it still has its place.

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Woodknack

12844 posts in 2801 days


#9 posted 03-27-2018 11:53 PM



It seems to me that anything you “sprinkle on” your glue up will only weaken the glue joint.
- jerkylips

Why do you think so? I’ve never done it and have no opinion, but I have considered trying it.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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JayT

6226 posts in 2632 days


#10 posted 03-28-2018 01:14 AM

I’ve used salt a few times on glue-ups and it worked fine. Never had any issue with a “weaker” joint. The glue joint is still stronger than the wood.

-- https://www.jtplaneworks.com - In theory, there is no difference between theory and practice. In practice, there is.

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AxkMan

65 posts in 547 days


#11 posted 03-28-2018 01:29 AM

I heard more commonly that you should clean the area before applying glue. Most tell you that it creates a weak bond. That’s a good one if it works.

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MrRon

5572 posts in 3664 days


#12 posted 03-28-2018 05:42 PM

I wonder if sand might be better than salt. Sodium and chlorine might interact

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fivecodys

1437 posts in 2057 days


#13 posted 03-28-2018 05:46 PM

Nick Ferry over on you tube just did a quick video about this subject and an alternative way to keep boards better aligned. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Il5vFKGv3Uc

I though it was interesting.

Chem

-- When you leave your shop for the night, make sure you can always count to 10.

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Ocelot

2273 posts in 3059 days


#14 posted 03-28-2018 05:48 PM

Reminds me that back in the day, my Dad took a borrowed pickup truck to collect a 200lb block of ice. He told the ice man that he was concerned that it might slide around in the bed. The man took a shovel of gravel (from a pile right by for that purpose), threw it in the truck and set the ice on it. It didn’t move. Dad didn’t like it. He would have had a fit if somebody had done that to his truck.

Yeah, I could see that a little salt in the joint could help – but then again, I’d rather not do it.

-Paul

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Woodknack

12844 posts in 2801 days


#15 posted 03-28-2018 06:11 PM

I try to do glue ups with the lumber oversize so if it slips a little no matter.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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