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Friends tragedy has me wanting a guard & riving knife/splitter for a PM66

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Forum topic by Winny94 posted 03-25-2018 10:14 PM 5626 views 1 time favorited 47 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Winny94

20 posts in 861 days


03-25-2018 10:14 PM

An old friend of mine just lost his dad to a woodworking accident. The family is obviously devastated, so I dont’t know the details, but from what we have pieced together, it may have been a kickback caused contact w/ the table saw.

It has caused me to reevaluate running an unguarded tablesaw going forward. From what i’ve gathered, there are no riving knife options for a PM66, but the Shark Guard is a pretty good option even though it is a splitter – is this going to be my best option?


47 replies so far

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eflanders

326 posts in 2270 days


#1 posted 03-25-2018 10:18 PM

Get a Shark guard. I put one on myself a month ago, safe , easy and effective!

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MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#2 posted 03-25-2018 10:22 PM

A riving knife is just a splitter by a different name. They both perform the same function. The PM66 shipped with a guard and splitter, and there are several aftermarket ones you can buy, or you can make your own.

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Tony_S

976 posts in 3502 days


#3 posted 03-25-2018 11:13 PM



An old friend of mine just lost his dad to a woodworking accident. The family is obviously devastated, so I dont t know the details, but from what we have pieced together, it may have been a kickback caused contact w/ the table saw.
- Winny94

I’ve seen my share of nasty table saw accidents….broken ribs, ruptured testicle, nasty hand/blade contact accidents. But I’ve never even heard of someone dying from a kick back.
I’ve got one old bugger in the shop who I’ve prayed to the woodworking gods for….he’s got a metal heart valve and takes massive amounts of blood thinners…a simple scratch can bleed for days. If he ever had an ‘incident’ like a kick back to the chest, or blade contact, it could be pretty ugly.
Thankfully he’s retiring in a month.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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Winny94

20 posts in 861 days


#4 posted 03-25-2018 11:16 PM


An old friend of mine just lost his dad to a woodworking accident. The family is obviously devastated, so I dont t know the details, but from what we have pieced together, it may have been a kickback caused contact w/ the table saw.
- Winny94

I ve seen my share of nasty table saw accidents….broken ribs, ruptured testicle, nasty hand/blade contact accidents. But I ve never even heard of someone dying from a kick back.
I ve got one old bugger in the shop who I ve prayed to the woodworking gods for….he s got a metal heart valve and takes massive amounts of blood thinners…a simple scratch can bleed for days. If he ever had an incident like a kick back to the chest, or blade contact, it could be pretty ugly.
Thankfully he s retiring in a month.

- Tony_S


Without getting into gory details, somehow a major artery came in contact with a blade – we’re thinking it could’ve been a kickback causing a knockout/dazed then into the saw.

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Tony_S

976 posts in 3502 days


#5 posted 03-25-2018 11:25 PM

Damn….If that’s what happened…..that would have been ugly.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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Winny94

20 posts in 861 days


#6 posted 03-25-2018 11:28 PM



Damn….If that s what happened…..that would have been ugly.

- Tony_S


Yea, and his wife who is one of the sweetest people youll meet, found him. He was a professional cabinet maker for 30+ years, so it had to be something freaky to get him in that position.

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toolie

2158 posts in 3048 days


#7 posted 03-26-2018 12:04 AM


Damn….If that s what happened…..that would have been ugly.

- Tony_S

Yea, and his wife who is one of the sweetest people youll meet, found him. He was a professional cabinet maker for 30+ years, so it had to be something freaky to get him in that position.

- Winny94

Absolutely tragic. It’s got me rethinking how i interact with dimensional material.

-- there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

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LesB

2126 posts in 3863 days


#8 posted 03-26-2018 12:34 AM

My neighbor died after a kick back accident. He developed septicemia and even after two visits to the hospital it took him. He had worked in construction and was an electrical inspector when he retired so he knew the hazards.

-- Les B, Oregon

View Charlie H.'s profile

Charlie H.

377 posts in 1070 days


#9 posted 03-26-2018 01:46 AM

That’s a tragic accident.
Condolences to all family and friends.

-- Regards, Charlie in Rowlett, TX --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

View Alex Lane's profile

Alex Lane

549 posts in 4310 days


#10 posted 03-26-2018 02:11 AM

Wow it’s hard to imagine the utter horror of an accident like this. This makes me want to give a high priority to adding a splitter and guard to my old 8” craftsman saw with 3hp motor. Could a power feeder contribute to prevention of kickback? Or maybe it can help keep the operator from being so close to the line of fire? It obviously can’t be practical in all table saw operations but maybe its worth the investment if it can offer another layer of protection. So sorry for the tragedy.

-- Lane Custom Guitars and Basses

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

432 posts in 846 days


#11 posted 03-26-2018 02:23 AM

So sorry to hear this. Condolences to your friend and his family.

I’ve been mulling over a Shark Guard for a long time. They are high quality and well worth it. Get one.

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MrRon

5571 posts in 3663 days


#12 posted 03-26-2018 04:32 PM

Everything in life can have a potentially tragic outcome; whether it be driving your car, being in the wrong place at the wrong time, hunting or doing woodworking. Accidents are something we don’t plan for, or anticipate, but they will happen regardless of all our precautions. Rushing out to buy the latest safety device is akin to woodworking phobia. We should be placing our focus on how we deal personally with our safety rather than depending on “devices” to keep us safe. That is my personal opinion and I have been working wood for the past 70 years and still at it. To me, being “afraid or fearful” of guns, for example is unfounded. Those who are afraid of their power saw probably shouldn’t have one. The same with a gun or high powered car. What they say about being “not for the timid” surely applies to woodworking, at least where power tools are concerned. I do not believe anything can be made that is 100% safe. Sooner or later, it will rise up and bite you in the (you know where). Sorry for the rant, but I need to vent from time to time.

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MrUnix

7405 posts in 2618 days


#13 posted 03-26-2018 04:37 PM

To me, being “afraid or fearful” of guns, for example is unfounded. Those who are afraid of their power saw probably shouldn t have one. The same with a gun or high powered car. What they say about being “not for the timid” surely applies to woodworking, at least where power tools are concerned.
- MrRon

On the other hand, being complacent is just as bad…

On the back of my motorcycle helmet, I have a sticker that says “Know Fear” :)

Cheers,
Brad

-- Brad in FL - In Dog I trust... everything else is questionable

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Winny94

20 posts in 861 days


#14 posted 03-26-2018 05:19 PM



Everything in life can have a potentially tragic outcome; whether it be driving your car, being in the wrong place at the wrong time, hunting or doing woodworking. Accidents are something we don t plan for, or anticipate, but they will happen regardless of all our precautions. Rushing out to buy the latest safety device is akin to woodworking phobia. We should be placing our focus on how we deal personally with our safety rather than depending on “devices” to keep us safe. That is my personal opinion and I have been working wood for the past 70 years and still at it. To me, being “afraid or fearful” of guns, for example is unfounded. Those who are afraid of their power saw probably shouldn t have one. The same with a gun or high powered car. What they say about being “not for the timid” surely applies to woodworking, at least where power tools are concerned. I do not believe anything can be made that is 100% safe. Sooner or later, it will rise up and bite you in the (you know where). Sorry for the rant, but I need to vent from time to time.

- MrRon


No one said anything about fear – just taking precautions. Why not stack the deck in your favor

View jamsomito's profile

jamsomito

432 posts in 846 days


#15 posted 03-26-2018 05:27 PM


No one said anything about fear – just taking precautions. Why not stack the deck in your favor

- Winny94

This is my mentality.

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