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Forum topic by Hornnumb2 posted 03-24-2018 04:49 PM 1508 views 0 times favorited 19 replies Add to Favorites Watch
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Hornnumb2

38 posts in 1222 days


03-24-2018 04:49 PM

Any advice on using contact cement with formica. I have done it several times but always doubt myself of how long to what. Help me out. Thanks Michael


19 replies so far

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LesB

2093 posts in 3837 days


#1 posted 03-24-2018 05:02 PM

Contact cement works fine and is probably the standard for laminating formica to the substrate. Follow the instructions on the container but for the most part you coat both sides and wait until it is “dry” to the touch before bringing them together. The time to dry varies with the ambient temperature and thickness of the application. I prefer to use the spray can type unless covering a large area then use a roller for a uniform application.

-- Les B, Oregon

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Hornnumb2

38 posts in 1222 days


#2 posted 03-24-2018 05:13 PM

Thats basically what I do but I am always afraid that I will wait to long, its usually still a little tacky. I guess I should wait longer…

View John Smith's profile

John Smith

1834 posts in 556 days


#3 posted 03-24-2018 07:06 PM

when it does not stick to the back of your knuckles.
you can always practice with scraps until you figure out what works for you in your area.
like Les said: temperature, humidity and thickness is a major factor in determining correct “dryness”.
what may take 30 minutes to tack up in Florida may take an hour in Oregon.

.

-- Failure is proof that you at least tried ~ now, go do it again, and again, until you get it right --

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Craftsman on the lake

2975 posts in 3831 days


#4 posted 03-24-2018 07:24 PM

Coat both surfaces and wait till dry. Coat them again and wait till dry… or at least tacky but not lifting on your finger. You can use a hair dryer to assist if you want. At that point, when the two surfaces come in contact with each other it’s a done deal, so make sure things are lined up. You won’t be separating them to do that. Usually you put narrow slats spaced a foot apart then remove them and let the formica contact the wood. It will always hold, and it will not come apart. The glue will not stick to the wood slats so don’t worry about not being able to remove them.

The two coats are very important. One won’t do the job.
Don’t worry if the glue isn’t wet or sticky at all. It’s meant to work best after it’s dry.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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Richard

11274 posts in 3426 days


#5 posted 03-24-2018 09:43 PM


Coat both surfaces and wait till dry. Coat them again and wait till dry… or at least tacky but not lifting on your finger. You can use a hair dryer to assist if you want. At that point, when the two surfaces come in contact with each other it s a done deal, so make sure things are lined up. You won t be separating them to do that. Usually you put narrow slats spaced a foot apart then remove them and let the formica contact the wood. It will always hold, and it will not come apart. The glue will not stick to the wood slats so don t worry about not being able to remove them.

The two coats are very important. One won t do the job.
Don t worry if the glue isn t wet or sticky at all. It s meant to work best after it s dry.

- Craftsman on the lake

That’s it, on the button! Thank You Mr. Craftsman!

-- Richard (Ontario, CANADA)

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000

2859 posts in 1293 days


#6 posted 03-24-2018 11:04 PM

Depends on the brand you are using.
Normally it will say how long of open time you have. The “open time” is how long you can wait before you have to recoat it.

I spray my contact cement and have done so for many years. I spray each side one time and it’s good. Only time I spray two coats are on edges of particle board or mdf and really porous woods that soak it in.
Really depends on how heavy you apply each coat.
If you put the contact cement on too heavy it could leave lumpy surface, especially on gloss laminates
(even though laminate is thick.)

Brand may make a difference, and the amount of coverage you put on will make a difference.
Here is some info for the typical solvent based, Weldwood Contact Cement, you get from the big box stores.

https://www.homedepot.com/catalog/pdfImages/12/12e6f4e2-c6c3-4bbe-9367-bd642b8192ab.pdf

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Craftsman on the lake

2975 posts in 3831 days


#7 posted 03-24-2018 11:59 PM

My experience is only with the quart cans you brush on. Direction later down the page of the post above do say this.

“Recoat any dull spots after first coat is dry. Two coats may be required on rough or porous surfaces.”

I have found, that if you want something to stay on. Especially a formica countertop, the two coats insure a never ending bond. When I’ve used one coat I might have separating areas. I’ve been burned by that experience more than once.
But, do spread it good.

-- The smell of wood, coffee in the cup, the wife let's me do my thing, the lake is peaceful.

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000

2859 posts in 1293 days


#8 posted 03-25-2018 12:10 AM

Yes Craftsman, that why I said,

“I spray two coats are on edges of particle board or mdf and really porous woods that soak it in. “

I don’t ever put on 2 coats though, unless it needs it.
Also the thicker you put it on, more of a glue line will show. Some colors not as bad as others.

Whatever works for you is best, I know what works for me.

Speaking of…..
Just installed these in an office this morning.

View pontic's profile

pontic

693 posts in 1002 days


#9 posted 03-25-2018 12:32 AM

I thin mine with Xylene It goes on smoother and less lumpy.

-- Illigitimii non carburundum sum

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woodbutcherbynight

5966 posts in 2802 days


#10 posted 03-25-2018 02:02 AM



Yes Craftsman, that why I said,

“I spray two coats are on edges of particle board or mdf and really porous woods that soak it in. “

I don t ever put on 2 coats though, unless it needs it.
Also the thicker you put it on, more of a glue line will show. Some colors not as bad as others.

Whatever works for you is best, I know what works for me.

Speaking of…..
Just installed these in an office this morning.

- jbay

Nice work! What do you use to spray the glue it with?

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

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000

2859 posts in 1293 days


#11 posted 03-25-2018 03:07 AM


Nice work! What do you use to spray the glue it with?

- woodbutcherbynight

Thanks,
I spray out of a 2 1/2 gallon pressure pot.

View Tony_S's profile

Tony_S

970 posts in 3476 days


#12 posted 03-25-2018 12:37 PM



I spray out of a 2 1/2 gallon pressure pot.
- jbay

J
Have you ever tried the pressurized canister style contacts?
I switched over to them about 8 years ago and never looked back. It’s expensive in comparison to most non pressurized contacts but worth it. Big labor savings for us in house, and even better yet, it’s pretty much eliminated the ‘stupid’ factor. Service calls for veneer problems dropped to near zero.
We go through quite a bit so I usually buy it in 180lb tanks, but it comes in 38’s and aerosol cans as well. The propane style tanks are all exchangeable when they’re empty.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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000

2859 posts in 1293 days


#13 posted 03-25-2018 01:32 PM

I’ve looked into it a while back.
The old pressure pot works so well for me I never gave it a try.

I know some other guys that use them, they seem to like them. Maybe I will take another look into them.

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Tony_S

970 posts in 3476 days


#14 posted 03-25-2018 01:46 PM



The old pressure pot works so well for me I never gave it a try.
- jbay

Then again….might be a solution looking for a problem.

-- It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it. Aristotle

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000

2859 posts in 1293 days


#15 posted 03-25-2018 01:56 PM

Everything has a learning curve.
It’s like making the switch to water based finishes.
I’ve looked into it, just can’t make the change.

Hard to teach this old dog new tricks. lol

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